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Lecture Reconsidered: Teaching with Students

Lecture Reconsidered: Teaching with Students

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Lecture Reconsidered: Teaching with Students

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  1. Lecture Reconsidered: Teaching with Students Carl S. Moore, Assistant Director Carl.moore@temple.edu Teaching and Learning Center Temple University

  2. Workshop Outline Wood, D., Bruner, J. S., & Ross, G. (1976). The Role of Tutoring in Problem Solving*. Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, 17(2), 89-100. RESEARCH ON LECTURE LITERATURE ON STUDENT LEARNING CONNECTING THE DOTS USING STUDENTS TO REACH THE LEARNING GOAL BEST PRACTICES LECTURE RECONSIDERED THINK TANK CLOSING

  3. WORKSHOP GOALS LEAVING THIS WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS SHOULD: • Reconceptualize the way lecture is viewed as a teaching method • Identify strategies and tools that can be used to engage students

  4. Lecture Reconsidered

  5. Lecture Reconsidered (Freire, 1998)

  6. What is a lecture? • Bligh (2000)’s meta-analysis of attention span in lectures indicates: • 12minutes optimum time for focusing • No more than 20minutes of uninterrupted talk • Bligh (2000)’s meta-analysis of attention span in lectures indicates: • 12 minutes optimum time for focusing • No more than 20 minutes of uninterrupted talk

  7. Bligh (2000)’s meta-analysis of attention span in lectures indicates: • 12minutes optimum time for focusing • No more than 20minutes of uninterrupted talk (Hake, 1998)

  8. Engaging Students • What do you see? • How does this picture relate to engaging students?

  9. Best Practices Change every 15 -20 minutes Think-Pair-Share Have student present the lecture material Use of technology such as Poll Everywhere Connect Cards Group Notes (in class/wiki)

  10. Think Tank What are some strategies that you have used to engage students in your classroom? Small vs. Large?

  11. Check-In with Poll Everywhere What is one thing you will continue to do or will try as a result of attending this workshop?

  12. References • Bloom, B. S. (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives, handbook 1: Cognitive domain. New York: Longmans Green • Blumer, H. (1986). Symbolic interactionism: Perspective and method. University of California Press. • Freire, A. M. A., & Macedo, D. (1998). The Paulo Freire Reader. Cassell and Continuum, 370 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10017. • Gokhale, A. A. (1995). Collaborative learning enhances critical thinking. • Hake, R. R. (1998). Interactive-engagement versus traditional methods: A six-thousand-student survey of mechanics test data for introductory physics courses. American journal of Physics, 66, 64 • Watkins, C. J. C. H., & Dayan, P. (1992). Learning. Machine Learning, 8(3), 279-292.