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Developing a Part 46 Training Plan

Developing a Part 46 Training Plan

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Developing a Part 46 Training Plan

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  1. Developing a Part 46 Training Plan

  2. Welcome Feb. 20-24, 2006 “Focus on Safety Week” for Metal and Nonmetal Mines Nationwide

  3. Session Agenda • I. Welcome and Introductory Remarks • Part 46 Regulatory Review • Writing a Training Plan • Training Resources • Session Wrap-up

  4. Regulatory Overview

  5. Under Part 46 Who Has to be Trained? Miners and other personsat: • Shell dredging • Sand • Gravel • Surface Stone • Surface Clay • Colloidal phosphate AND • Surface Limestone mines

  6. Who is Considered a “Miner”? • Any person, including any operator or supervisor, who works at a mine and who is engaged in mining operations; • Includes independent contractors and employees of independent contractors who are engaged in mining operations; AND • Any construction worker who is exposed to hazards of mining operations.

  7. What is the Minimum Information Required for a Training Plan? • Name of production operator or independent contractor, mine name(s), MSHA mine ID number(s) or independent contractor number(s). • Name and position of person designated who is responsible for health & safety training.

  8. What is the Minimum Information Required for a Training Plan? 3. General description of teaching methods, course materials, subject areas and approximate time for each subject area. • List of persons and/or organizations who will provide training and subject area each is competent to instruct. • Evaluation procedures used to determine effectiveness of training.

  9. Who Can Conduct Training? • Competent Person – means a person designated by the production-operator or independent contractor who has the ability, training, knowledge or experience to provide training to miners in his or her area of expertise. Must be able to effectively communicate the training subject to miners and to evaluate whether the training given to miners is effective.

  10. Who Can Conduct Training? • You may conduct your training • State or federal agencies • Associations of production-operators or independent contractors • Miners’ representatives • Consultants • Manufacturers’ representatives • Private associations • Educational institutions

  11. How Should the Training Be Conducted? • Classroom instruction • Instruction at the mine • Interactive computer-based instruction • Alternative training technologies • Any combination of training methods

  12. What are the Categories of Training Required by the Standard? • New miner training • Newly hired experienced miner training • New task training • Annual refresher training • Site specific hazard awareness training • Contractor training

  13. New Miner Training • New Miner – person who is beginning employment as a miner with a production-operator or independent contractor and who is not an experienced miner. • No less than 24 hours of training is required for new miners.

  14. New Miner Training: Before Beginning Work at the Mine (No Less Than 4 Hours) • Introduction to work environment; • Recognition and avoidance of electrical and other hazards; • Review of the emergency medical, escape and emergency evacuation plans, firewarning and firefighting; • Health & safety aspects of assigned tasks; • Statutory rights of miners; • Authority and responsibility of supervisors and miners’ representatives • Introduction to rules and procedures of reporting hazards

  15. New Miner Training: No Later Than 60 Calendar Days After Beginning Work at Mine • Instruction in use, care and maintenance of self-rescue and respiratory devices (if in use) • Review of first aid methods

  16. New Miner Training: No Later Than 90 Calendar Days After Beginning Work at Mine • Provide with balance, if any, of the 24 hours of training on any other subjects that promote health & safety for miners.

  17. Newly Hired Experienced Miner Training • Experienced Miner – person employed as a miner on or after October 2, 2000 who has completed 24 hours of new miner training under Sect. 46.5 of this part or under Sect. 48.25 of this title and who has at least 12 cumulative months of surface mining or equivalent experience.

  18. Newly Hired Experienced Miner: Before Beginning Work at the Mine • Introduction to work environment; • Recognition and avoidance of electrical and other hazards; • Review of the emergency medical, escape and emergency evacuation plans, firewarning and firefighting; • Health & safety aspects of assigned tasks; • Statutory rights of miners; • Authority and responsibility of supervisors and miners’ representatives • Introduction to rules and procedures of reporting hazards

  19. Newly Hired Experienced Miner: No Later Than 60 Calendar Days After Beginning Work at Mine • Instruction in use, care and maintenance of self-rescue and respiratory devices (if in use)

  20. New Task Training • To be provided to any miner who is reassigned to a new task in which he/she has no previous work experience • Train in the health & safety aspects and safe work procedures specific to that new task • Provide before the miner performs the new task

  21. Annual Refresher Training • No less than 8 hours • No later than 12 months after the miner begins work at the mine

  22. Annual Refresher Training • Changes at the mine that could adversely affect miners’ health or safety; • Other relevant health and safety topics.

  23. Applicable health and safety requirements Hazard Communication Transportation controls and communication systems Escape and emergency evacuation plans Firewarning and firefighting Use of hand-tools and welding equipment Material handling Ground conditions and control Traffic patterns and control Working in areas of highwalls Water hazards Prevention of accidents Explosives Respirators Working around moving objects (machine guarding) Fall prevention and protection Other Relevant Topics

  24. Other Relevant Topics: Equipment -Specific Training • Haulage and service trucks • Front-end loaders and tractors • Conveyor systems • Cranes • Crushers • Excavators • Dredges • Maintenance and repair

  25. Site-Specific Hazard Awareness Training (SSHAT) • Must be provided before any person specified is exposed to mine hazards • SSHAT is information or instructions on the hazards a person could be exposed to while at the mine and emergency procedures. • Not required for any person who is accompanied at all times by an experienced miner familiar with the hazards.

  26. Who Must Receive SSHAT? • Office or staff personnel • Scientific workers • Delivery workers • Customers, including commercial over-the-road drivers • Construction workers • Maintenance or service workers • Vendors or visitors

  27. Independent Contractor Training • Production-operator has responsibility for providing SSHAT and information regarding the contractor’s responsibility to comply with MSHA training requirements: • New miner training • Newly hired experienced miner training • New task training • Annual refresher training

  28. Developing a Part 46 Training Plan

  29. 2005 Metal / Nonmetal Fatal Accident Review www.msha.gov/stats/review/2005/2005review.asp

  30. MNM Fatals

  31. MNM Fatalities by Commodity * Trona, Lime, Platinum, Pumice, Phosphate, Iron Ore, Sandstone, Potash, Copper

  32. MNM Fatalities by Classification

  33. MNM Fatalities by Mine Size

  34. MNM Fatalities by Age

  35. MNM Fatalities by Mining Experience

  36. MNM Fatalities by Activity

  37. MNM Fatalities by Occupation

  38. Root Causes Note: Fatalities may have several root causes.

  39. MNM Fatalities – 1995-2005

  40. Fatalgrams and Fatal Investigation ReportsMetal and Nonmetal Mines www.msha.gov/fatals/fab.htm

  41. METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY - - On January 27, 2006, a 60-year old heavy equipment operator with 10 years mining experience was fatally injured at a crushed stone operation. He was operating a dozer to prepare a bench for drilling. The dozer traveled over the edge of a 50-foot highwall and fell to the quarry floor, submerging the cab in several feet of mud and water.

  42. METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY - - On January 27, 2006, a 60-year old heavy equipment operator with 10 years mining experience was fatally injured at a crushed stone operation. He was operating a dozer to prepare a bench for drilling. The dozer traveled over the edge of a 50-foot highwall and fell to the quarry floor, submerging the cab in several feet of mud and water. Best Practices Stop, Look, Analyze, and Manage (SLAM) each task to identify all potential hazards before performing work. Maintain and wear seat belts when operating machinery. Always keep the blade between yourself and the edge of the highwall when operating a dozer on the highwall bench. Operate equipment so that control is maintained. Reduce the throttle position and know how to immediately stop the dozer when working near the edge of the highwall. Provide adequate illumination when work is performed during non-daylight hours.

  43. METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY - On January 6, 2006, a 39-year old mechanic with 12 years mining experience was fatally injured at a sand and gravel operation while working on a front-end loader. The front and rear sections of the loader had been separated at the articulation joint and each section was independently supported with jack stands. The victim was positioned between the left rear tire and frame to remove a hydraulic hose. The frame of the loader tipped forward on the tires and swiveled to the left on the rear axle oscillation trunnion, pinning him.

  44. METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY - On January 6, 2006, a 39-year old mechanic with 12 years mining experience was fatally injured at a sand and gravel operation while working on a front-end loader. The front and rear sections of the loader had been separated at the articulation joint and each section was independently supported with jack stands. The victim was positioned between the left rear tire and frame to remove a hydraulic hose. The frame of the loader tipped forward on the tires and swiveled to the left on the rear axle oscillation trunnion, pinning him. • Best Practices • Stop, Look, Analyze, and Manage (SLAM) each task to identify all potential hazards before performing maintenance work. Practice safe work habits during the entire task. • Consult and follow the manufacturer's recommended safe work procedures for the maintenance task. • Train miners in safe work procedures before beginning repairs. • Securely block equipment against all hazardous motion at all times while performing maintenance work. If the equipment being blocked has multiple degrees of movement of freedom, exercise extreme caution because some instability modes may not be obvious.

  45. METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY - On November 18, 2005, a 52-year old repairman with 33 years mining experience was fatally injured at a crushed stone operation. A rubber-tired boom truck was being used to lift a motor from its mounting base. The victim, who was attempting to pry the motor free, was struck by the motor when it unexpectedly swung against the crusher as it came free.

  46. METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY - On November 18, 2005, a 52-year old repairman with 33 years mining experience was fatally injured at a crushed stone operation. A rubber-tired boom truck was being used to lift a motor from its mounting base. The victim, who was attempting to pry the motor free, was struck by the motor when it unexpectedly swung against the crusher as it came free. Best Practices Stop, Look, Analyze, and Manage (SLAM) each task to identify all potential hazards. Practice safe work habits during the entire task. Disassemble all tensioned components to prevent a sudden release of energy before dismantling equipment. Position yourself only in areas where you will not be exposed to hazards resulting from a sudden release of energy. Train miners in safe work procedures and ensure they are familiar with manufacturer's recommendations before beginning

  47. METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY - On November 4, 2005, a 21-year old laborer with 5 weeks mining experience was fatally injured at a crushed stone operation. The victim was being task trained to operate a haul truck. While backing down a ramp, he lost control of the truck. The truck went through a berm, overturned, and fell to the bench below.

  48. METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY - On November 4, 2005, a 21-year old laborer with 5 weeks mining experience was fatally injured at a crushed stone operation. The victim was being task trained to operate a haul truck. While backing down a ramp, he lost control of the truck. The truck went through a berm, overturned, and fell to the bench below.                                                                             Best Practices Task train new miners in all phases of mobile equipment operation at locations designated for training only. Provide classroom training that includes a thorough review of the Operator's Manual before hands-on training of operating mobile equipment. Experienced miners providing task training must be knowledgeable of all safety requirements and proficient in the safe operation of mobile equipment. Conduct pre-operational checks to identify any defects that may affect the safe operation of mobile equipment before placing it into service.