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Devil physics The baddest class on campus IB Physics

Devil physics The baddest class on campus IB Physics

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Devil physics The baddest class on campus IB Physics

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  1. Devil physicsThe baddest class on campusIB Physics

  2. Tsokos Lesson 7-2The Greenhouse effect and global warming

  3. IB Assessment Statements Topic 8.5. Greenhouse Effect Solar Radiation 8.5.1. Calculate the intensity of the Sun’s radiation incident on a planet. 8.5.2. Define albedo. 8.5.3. State factors that determine a planet’s albedo.

  4. IB Assessment Statements Topic 8.5. Greenhouse Effect The Greenhouse Effect 8.5.4. Describe the greenhouse effect. 8.5.5. Identify the main greenhouse gases and their sources. 8.5.6. Explain the molecular mechanisms by which greenhouse gases absorb infrared radiation. 8.5.7. Analyze absorption graphs to compare the relative effects of different greenhouse gases.

  5. IB Assessment Statements Topic 8.5. Greenhouse Effect The Greenhouse Effect 8.5.8. Outline the nature of black-body radiation. 8.5.9. Draw and annotate a graph of the emission spectra of black bodies at different temperatures. 8.5.10. State the Stefan-Boltzmann law and apply it to compare emission rates from different surfaces.

  6. IB Assessment Statements Topic 8.5. Greenhouse Effect The Greenhouse Effect 8.5.11. Apply the concept of emissivity to compare the emission rates from the different surfaces. 8.5.12. Define surface heat capacity Cs. 8.5.13. Solve problems on the greenhouse effect and the heating of planets using a simple energy balance climate model.

  7. IB Assessment Statements Topic 8.6. Global Warming 8.6.1. Describe some possible models of global warming. 8.6.2. State what is meant by the enhanced greenhouse effect. 8.6.3. Identify the increased combustion of fossil fuels as the likely major cause of the enhanced greenhouse effect. 8.6.4. Describe the evidence that links global warming to increased levels of greenhouse gases.

  8. IB Assessment Statements Topic 8.6. Global Warming 8.6.5. Outline some of the mechanisms that may increase the rate of global warming. 8.6.6. Define coefficient of volume expansion. 8.6.7. State that one possible effect of the enhanced greenhouse effect is a rise in mean sea-level. 8.6.8. Outline possible reasons for a predicted rise in mean sea-level.

  9. IB Assessment Statements Topic 8.6. Global Warming 8.6.9. Indentify climate change as an outcome of the enhanced greenhouse effect. 8.6.10. Solve problems related to the enhanced greenhouse effect. 8.6.11. Identify some possible solutions to reduce the enhanced greenhouse effect. 8.6.12. Discuss international efforts to reduce the enhanced greenhouse effect.

  10. Objectives • Understand and apply the black-body radiation law • Understand the meaning of the terms emissivity and albedo • Work with a simple energy balance equation • Understand the meaning of the term greenhouse effect and distinguish this effect from the enhanced greenhouse effect

  11. Objectives • Name the main greenhouse gases and their natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks • Understand the molecular mechanism for infrared radiation absorption • State the evidence linking global warming to the increased concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere • Understand the definition of surface heat capacity and apply it in simple situations

  12. Objectives • Discuss the expected trends on climate caused by changes in various factors and appreciate that these are interrelated • State possible solutions to the enhanced greenhouse effect and international efforts to counter global warming

  13. Introductory Video

  14. Reading Activity Questions?

  15. Black Body Law • All bodies that are kept at some absolute (Kelvin) temperature radiate energy in the form of electromagnetic waves • The power radiated by a body is governed by the Stefan-Boltzmann Law

  16. Stefan-Boltzmann Law • The amount of energy per second (power) radiated by a body depends on its surface area A, absolute (Kelvin) temperature T, and the properties of the surface (emissivity, e) • This is the Stefan-Boltzmann Law • σ is the Stefan-Boltzmann constant

  17. Emissivity • Dimensionless number from 0 to 1 that states a surface’s ability to radiate energy • For a theoretical perfect emitter, a black body, e = 1 • Dark and dull surfaces will have a higher emissivity • Light and shiny surfaces will have a lower emissivity

  18. Net Power • A body that radiates power will also absorb power with the same emissivity values • Net power is the difference between the two • At equilibrium, Pnet = 0 and the body loses as much energy as it gains, the temperature remains constant and equal to its surroundings

  19. Net Power • At equilibrium, Pnet = 0 and the earth as a system maintains constant temperature • If the power absorbed is greater than the power radiated, the earth system increases in temperature

  20. Emitted Radiation Wavelength • Black-body radiation is emitted over an infinite range of wavelengths, BUT • Most is emitted at a specific wavelength depending on the body’s temperature • Higher temperature, lower wavelength

  21. Emitted Radiation Wavelength • Most of the energy emitted is an infrared wavelength • That is why we associate emitted radiation with heat

  22. Wien’s Law • The relationship between the peak temperature and the peak wavelength (wavelength at which most of the energy is emitted) is given by

  23. Emitted Radiation vs Emissivity • Graph of Intensity versus wavelength for bodies with the same temperature, but different values of emissivity • Peak of the curve remains the same, but pitch of the curve increases with increased emissivity

  24. Solar Radiation • Sun is considered a perfect emitter, i.e. a black-body • Sun’s power output is 3.9 x 1026 W • The earth receives only a small fraction of this power equal to • Where a is the area used to collect the power and d is the earth-to-sun distance

  25. Intensity • Power of radiation received per unit area of the receiver

  26. Solar Constant • Substituting values into the intensity equation we get • Which is the solar constant, S • S ≈ 1400 Wm-2

  27. Solar Constant • If intensity is power per unit area, then power received is equal to intensity times the area of the receiver

  28. Albedo • Ratio of radiation power reflected to the power incident on a body • Light-colored, shiny objects have a high albedo, dark and dull objects have low albedo • The earth as a whole has an average albedo of 0.3

  29. Intermediate Summary • A portion of the Sun’s power reaches the earth • Part of that power is reflected, part is absorbed • When a body absorbs energy, the kinetic energy of its molecules increases and temperature increases • All bodies emit black body radiation which is proportional to temperature

  30. Radiation Reaching the Earth • The solar constant, S = 1400 W/m2, is the amount of solar power striking a given area of the atmosphere • At any given time, the area of the earth’s surface exposed to this radiation is equal to the area of a circle, πR2, using the radius of the earth

  31. Radiation Reaching the Earth • The total surface area of a sphere is 4πR2, so the ‘exposure’ area is only 1/4th the surface area of the earth • Therefore, the radiation received per square meter on the surface of the earth at any given time is,

  32. Radiation Reaching the Earth • Since 30% of this energy is reflected (albedo = 0.3, the actual radiation the Earth’s surface receives at any given moment is

  33. Energy Balance • The earth has a more or less constant average temperature and behaves like a black body • Therefore, the energy input to the earth must equal (balance) the energy radiated into space

  34. Energy Balance • Simplified Energy Diagram

  35. Energy Balance • Problems with the Simplified Energy Diagram • Not all of the earth’s radiated energy escapes the atmosphere • Some of the energy is absorbed by the atmosphere and re-radiated back toward the earth (this is the greenhouse effect)

  36. Energy Balance • Problems with the Simplified Energy Diagram • Model fails to consider other interactions with the atmosphere: • Latent heat flows • Thermal energy flows in oceans by currents • Thermal energy transfers (essentially conduction) between the surface and the atmosphere due to temperature differences

  37. Greenhouse Effect • Most of the solar radiation reaching earth is in the visible wavelength band • The atmosphere only reflects about 30% of this • The average temperature of the earth’s surface is 288K • Using Wien’s Law, the radiation emitted by the earth is in the infrared wavelength range

  38. Greenhouse Effect • Certain gases in the atmosphere (greenhouse gases) will allow the sun’s visible light to pass through, but will absorb the earth’s radiated infrared energy (emmision/absorption spectrum) • The energy is quickly re-radiated in all directions (as from a sphere) • Some of that energy is re-radiated back to the earth’s surface providing added warmth

  39. Greenhouse Effect • The Greenhouse Effect is a good thing • With the greenhouse effect the average temperature is 288 K / 15°C / 59°F • Without the greenhouse effect the average temperature is estimated to be 256 K / -17°C / 1°F • Primary greenhouse gases are water vapour, carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide

  40. Greenhouse Effect • Energy Diagram Including Greenhouse Effect

  41. Greenhouse Effect • Even this diagram doesn’t include: • Latent heat flows • Thermal energy flows in oceans by currents • Thermal energy transfers (essentially conduction) between the surface and the atmosphere due to temperature differences

  42. Greenhouse Effect • All-Encompassing Energy Diagram

  43. Greenhouse Effect • Table Format – Earth As A System

  44. Greenhouse Effect • Table Format – Balance for the Earth’s Surface

  45. Greenhouse Effect • Note the 111 units or 111% of radiation from the surface

  46. Greenhouse Effect • Previously, we said the intensity of the emitted radiation was 350 W/m2 which corresponded to a temperature of 256K • This chart indicates 111% of this value is actually emitted

  47. Greenhouse Effect • Actual emitted energy • This should correspond to an average surface temperature of 288K • Voila! Life is Good!

  48. Enhanced Greenhouse Effect • Unlike laundry detergent, enhanced is not necessarily better • Greenhouse gases keep the earth warm and toasty, but if we increase the amount of greenhouse gases, the place gets downright hot • More greenhouse gases means more energy radiated from the atmosphere back to the earth which means higher temperatures

  49. Enhanced Greenhouse Effect • Greenhouse gases have natural as well as anthropogenic (geek speak for man-made) sources

  50. Enhanced Greenhouse Effect