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  1. Today we will: • Address your questions about the grading contract; • Discuss the readings for today and come up with a definition of plagiarism; • Look at the best strategies for avoiding plagiarism; • Look at MLA formatting. Reminders: • Put your feeder 1.1 and grading contract slips on my desk, please. (Like, now.) • We’ll meet at the Undergrad Library, room 205, at 9am on Friday!

  2. Is this plagiarism? • In your group: discuss whether this is a case of plagiarism (make a pro/con list) and come to a consensus. • Post your group’s response to our website (Post Your Work  Week 3  Plagiarism Discussion) and get ready to report your result to the class!

  3. Plagiarism… … is the “deliberate or reckless representation of another’s words, thoughts, or ideas as one’s own without attribution in connection with submission of academic work, whether graded or otherwise.” (Student Manual) “This also includes the deliberate falsification, fabrication, or misrepresentation of data, other information, or citations.”

  4. Consequences • Someone who is found guilty of plagiarism • Gets an F for the course; • Gets expelled for a semester; • Gets an entry on the transcript for ten years.

  5. Documenting Sources • MLA = Modern Language Association • All these rules are in your handbook, How to Write Anything. USE IT! • 5 Ways not to Cheat: • Quotations • Quotations of quotations • Paraphrases • Summaries • Common knowledge

  6. 1. Quotation A quotation preserves the original author’s words exactly. It must be: • Signaled by a phrase: according to…, John Smith argues that…, he further mentions/states/suggests/… • Cited correctly. • Punctuated correctly. • Provide the full name of an author when you mention her/him for the first time; subsequently, only use the person’s last name (not his/her first name!) • Don’t allow a quotation stand alone in a text!

  7. 1. Quotation Cont’d Example: I was underwhelmed with Lady Gaga’s performance at the VMAs because, as Jon Caramanica from the New York Times puts it, Gaga spent too much time “spewing an aimless monologue while smoking a cigarette and cursing like a fourth grader”(par. 11). When you don’t mention the author’s name before the quotation, it goes into the bracket: I was underwhelmed with Lady Gaga’s performance at the VMAs because Gaga spent too much time “spewing an aimless monologue while smoking a cigarette and cursing like a fourth grader” (Caramanica par. 11). Block quote: Caramanicaalso disparagingly discusses Beyoncé’s performance at the VMAs when he says that it was a nice gesture that Beyoncé performed at this show, but really she was there to make an announcement: she is pregnant, which she gave away during the preshow, when she clutched her belly for photographers. (par. 10)

  8. 1. Quotation Cont’d Addition or any Change: Jan Harold Brunvand, in an essay on urban legends, states: "some individuals [who retell urban legends] make a point of learning every rumor or tale" (78). Omission: In an essay on urban legends, Jan Harold Brunvand notes that "some individuals make a point of learning every recent rumor or tale . . . and in a short time a lively exchange of details occurs" (78).

  9. 2. Quotation of a Quotation • Use this technique when you borrow a direct quotation that was already cited in your source material. • Signal both the author of the article/book and the speaker of the quotation! Example: Caramanica then mentions that Britney Spears declined Lady Gaga’s offer of a kiss because “‘I’ve done that already,’ referring to her 2003 VMA tangle with Madonna and Christina Aguilera”(par. 8).

  10. 3. Paraphrase • Paraphrasesexpress an author’s original ideas in different words and in a different order. • All paraphrases must be cited. • Signal if you want to call attention to the original author. Original by Caramanica “This was maybe the most bleeped award show in history, and certainly among the lewdest.” Paraphrase This year’s VMAs contained many censored moments because performers used foul language like seldom before (Caramanica par.2).

  11. 4. Summary Concisely conveys the main idea of a longer passage from an original source. Must be cited and, if necessary, signaled. Quotation: According to the Instrument of Student Governance, UNC’s Honor Court defines plagiarism as the “deliberate or reckless representation of another’s words, thoughts, or ideas as one’s own without attribution in connection with submission of academic work, whether graded or otherwise” (II.B.1.). Summary: TheInstrument of Student Governance discourages any behavior that disrespects other people, including misrepresenting others’ work as your own (II).

  12. 5. Common Knowledge Information that is widely known can be considered common knowledge: • If you find the same information in multiple sources, it may be common knowledge; • If your audience can be said to assume the information, it is common knowledge. • If the information would be found in a basic Encyclopedia entry, it is probably common knowledge. • If several sources offer different answers to the same question, however, it is very likely that no answer can be considered common knowledge.

  13. Works Cited Page • Your paper is incomplete unless it has both in-text citations and bibliographic citations. • All entries in the Works Cited page must correspond to the works cited in the main text. • Always start a new page for the Works Cited page.

  14. MLA Finetuning Exercise Mack, Kristin. "The Effects of Early Parental Death on Sibling Relationships in Later Life." Omega: Journal of Death and Dying Vol. 49.3 (2004): 131-148. Web. 14 Jan. 2011 <http://search.proquest.com/docview/57201307?accountid=14244>. Fowkes, Katherine A. The Fantasy Film. Chichester, U.K. ;: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. Print. McKenzie, Susan. "Queering gender: anima/animus and the paradigm of emergence." Journal of Analytical Psychology 51.3 (2006): 401-421. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 19 Jan. 2011. Walton, Theresa A, Helstein, Michelle T. Triumph of Backlash: Wrestling Community and the "Problem" of TitleIX. Sociology of Sport Journal; Sep2008, Vol. 25 Issue 3, p369-386, 18p. Academic Search Premier. January 20, 2011.

  15. Homework for Friday • Complete library's research tutorial. Don't forget to put in your first and last name so I can see that you passed the quiz at the end! • Optional, yet highly recommended: read Chapters 35, 36, 38, and 39 (pages 400-411, 415-423) in How to Write Anything to prepare for our class activities.