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Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) PowerPoint Presentation
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Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA)

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA)

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Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA)

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Presentation Transcript

  1. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA)

  2. The organization has adopted a policy of zero tolerance for employees who knowingly/willingly violate confidentiality/security of Protected Health Information. Any staff member who knowingly/willingly breaches confidentiality/security of Protected Health Information will result in termination.

  3. Health Information Portability and Accountability Act Privacy -anything written or verbally spoken -conscious effort by healthcare workers to keep patient information secret -includes physical condition, emotional status, financial information, and etc. -P.H.I. should not be discussed in public places -breaches of confidentiality should be reported to someone who can actively advocate for the patient -P.H.I. is to be given out on a need to know basis only -protecting PHI is everyone’s responsibility -we must have a written or verbal consent to release PHI, except in emergencies

  4. Health Information Portability and Accountability Act • Security • -any PHI that is on a computer system • preventing computer viruses or malicious software by using caution when opening email attachments and using caution when downloading from the internet • -Phishing- deceptive e-mail directing you to an official looking, but phony website • -Physical security- as it relates to HIPAA, is securing of physical devices and media from loss or theft

  5. Health Information Portability and Accountability Act Security -keeping passwords confidential -changing passwords on a regular basis decreases the risk of a password being compromised. -when creating a password try not to use people, places, and sports teams -use upper and lower case letters -report any suspicious activity related to PHI immediately

  6. PATIENT RIGHTS • The right to receive a Notice of the Privacy Practices • The right to obtain access, inspect and copy their PHI • The right to an accounting of the disclosures of their PHI • The right to receive confidential communications • The right to request an amendment to their PHI

  7. PATIENT RIGHTS • The patient has a right to request a restriction of their PHI • The patient has a right to receive an accounting of disclosures outside of treatment, payment or operations. • The patient has a right to file a complaint to our organization or to the Secretary of Health and Human Services about the organization’s privacy practices and/or suspected violations.

  8. Question: Can we share our user names and passwords with anyone (including co-workers, Students, and etc.)?

  9. Answer: No, Never!!!!! You are responsible for your userid and password!

  10. Question: Can you put someone on a prayer list at church when they are a patient in this facility?

  11. Answer: If you have learned the information from work – no. You can always have unspoken prayer requests.

  12. Question: If I have a patient in one area (ex. Home Health or an out patient) and they are admitted to the hospital, can I look at the acute records? 

  13. Answer: You should only be accessing the record if you have a need to know in order to provide continued service for the patient. Need to know would include a referral in the hospital to continue care or referral for follow up care. If it is for any other reason, it would be considered a HIPAA violation.

  14. Question: If I have seen a patient during an earlier hospital stay, can I look at old chart information?

  15. Answer: Yes, if you receive a referral or need information for the treatment plan.

  16. Question: When talking to a referring facility – what initial information are you allowed to give?

  17. Answer: You are allowed to give as much information as needed. This falls under continuity of care.

  18. Question: Is it a HIPAA violation to access portions of the chart that I do not need?

  19. Answer: Yes

  20. Question: If your immediate family member is in the hospital, can you look at their records?

  21. Answer: No – you must follow hospital policy for obtaining records.

  22. Question: Is it a HIPAA violation to look at your own test results? Must you sign a release of information form first and go through the health information department?

  23. Answer: You must follow the hospital policy on obtaining records, which requires that you sign a release of information and Health Information will copy your records for you.

  24. Question: Am I allowed to discuss Patient information in a public area?

  25. Answer: You need to be aware of your surroundings and be discrete.

  26. Question: Can you go in and see who is in the hospital without looking at information?

  27. Answer: No, this would be considered a HIPAA violation.

  28. The organization has adopted a policy of zero tolerance for employees who knowingly/willingly violate confidentiality/security of Protected Health Information. Any staff member who knowingly/willingly breaches confidentiality/security of Protected Health Information will result in termination.

  29. Questions Who can I contact about HIPAA? Debbie Martin, Director of Health InformationHIPAAPrivacy Officer Maleigha Amyx, Director of Information Services HIPAA Security Officer