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Open Hearing

Open Hearing

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Open Hearing

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  1. Open Hearing Dover Warrant Committee Monday, March 18, 2013

  2. Open Hearing • Warrant Committee Meeting to present the Fiscal Year 2014’s (FY14’s) Warrant Articles, Budget requests and preliminary Budget. • Starting in the summer of 2012 and continuing through last week, the Warrant Committee met with Town departments and the educational entities as Town revenue expectations and expenditure budgets were developed.

  3. Open Hearing • The objective was to arrive at the FY14 preliminary budget, which we will present to you tonight. The annual Blue Book containing the recommended budget will be prepared and delivered in April a few weeks prior to Town Meeting on Monday, May 6. • Again, this year we have continued towards improving the budgeting process and communication among the entities.

  4. Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting • This year we have 24 Articles • 13 Articles are, basically, “housekeeping” with 3 of those of routine and, largely, without financial implication and • 10 Articles are financial, but largely routinein nature • 8 Articles are special (non-recurring): 3 of which are, largely, non-financial and the remaining 5 have financial implications. • 1 Article has been withdrawn as of the time of this meeting.

  5. Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting • Articles this year are brought forward by the following sponsors: • Selectmen (11) • Assessors (1) • Planning Board (1) • Regional School Committee (4) • Warrant Committee (4) • Town Clerk (1) • Citizens Petition (1) • Council on Aging (1, withdrawn)

  6. Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting • The primary financial Articles • Article 4 • Amount to raise and appropriate for salaries and expenditures by departments, officers, boards, and committees of the Town as listed in the Blue Book • The bulk of the Town’s Operating Budget • Article 5 • Amount to raise for various capital purposes listed in the Warrant and the Blue Book

  7. Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting • The financial Articles (contd.) • Special Articles (generally, non-recurring) • Dover-Sherborn Regional School Committee • Middle School Air Conditioning • Article 13 - Borrowing Authorization • Article 14– Payment by Free Cash • Authorization for Funding Various Future Capital Items • Article 15 – Through Free Cash • Article 16 – Either through Free cash or borrowing (at the discretion of the voters of Dover, independent of how Sherborn funds it) • Selectmen • Article 17 – Rail Trail feasibility study

  8. Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting • The Other Special Articles (3) • Special Articles (generally, non-recurring) • Planning Board • Article 11 - Associate Member • Citizens’ Petition • Article 12 – Town vote for Projects on town property • Selectmen • Article 18 – Medical marijuana treatment centers

  9. Overview of Dover TownOperating BudgetFiscal Year 2014 (Preliminary, as of March 18, 2013)

  10. FY2014 Budget Components Total $33.4 M

  11. Revenue Sources and Expenditures

  12. FY2014 Article 4Spending by Category “Debt” includes Dover’s share of the Regional Schools’ debt Total $31.8 M (+3.5%)

  13. FY2012-2014 Article 4 FY13 3.0% FY14 +1.7% FY13 +1.3% FY14 +8.9% FY13 +6.7% FY14 +1.9% FY13 +5.6% FY14 -0.3% FY13 -1.8% FY14 -2.2% FY13 +6.2% FY14 +5.3% FY13 +6.8% FY14 +1.5% FY13 8.6% FY14 +4.8% FY13 +4.6% FY14 +3.7%

  14. Summary of Spending by Category

  15. FY2014 Estimated Revenue Total $33.4 M (+1.0%)

  16. FY2012-2014 Revenue FY13: +3.9% FY14: +3.8% FY13: -6.5% FY14: -2.8% FY13: +6.1% FY14: -8.7% FY13: +2.1% FY14: -25.6% FY13: -0.9% FY14: -0.7% FY13: flat FY14: flat

  17. Budget Gap

  18. Budget Gapas a Percentage of Expenses

  19. Open Hearing • Thank you

  20. Dover Public School FY14 Operating Budget Presentation March 18, 2013

  21. Dover Public SchoolFY14 Budget OverviewWhere does the money go? • FY Operating Budget $9,102,492

  22. Dover Public SchoolFY14 Operating Budget

  23. Dover Public SchoolFY14 Budget DriversRegular Education Increase of 2.58% $143,489 (increase 2% excluding World Language of $30,000) Estimated enrollment is 487 with 27 sections. (7% estimated decline in enrollment) • Teachers are in third year of contract with no COLA for teachers on the matrix and 1.25% COLA for those at the top. Support Staff budgeted for 2%. Salary increase of $185,000 • Reductions in staff of .4 FTE – PE (.3) and Art(.1). Reductions were made to reflect enrollment and workload. Salary decrease of $30,000 • Other reductions were made in supplies, regular ED transportation and miscellaneous items. Supply, transportation and other decrease of $35,000

  24. Dover Public SchoolFY14 Budget DriversSpecial Education In District- increase of 12.84% $114,600 Estimated # of Students on Individual Education Plans (IEP): 75 (FY13 actual is 71) • Majority attributable to 3 additional SPED aides Salary increase of $68,000 • Contractual services increased due to current IEP cohort Salary increase of $22,000 • Return of a teacher on leave and contract increases Salary increase of $24,000

  25. Dover Public SchoolFY14 Budget DriversSpecial Education Out of District (OOD) – increase of 25.64% $488,949 Estimating 29 OOD placements (Students 3-22 years of age) (FY13 was budgeted for 24, actual is 26) • 5 new OOD placements Tuition increase of $310,000 • Cases moving from day programs to residential Tuition increase of $100,000 • Current Tuition increases of 3% Tuition increase of $50,000 • Transportation costs resulting from 3% increases and new placements Transportation increase of $25,000

  26. Dover Public SchoolFY14 Operating BudgetNew Initiative – World Language • Dover and Sherborn are proposing to add a Foreign Language in Elementary School (FLES) Spanish program • Implementation will include one grade per year, beginning in K. Full implementation (K-5) will be completed in FY19. • Program costs are being shared with Sherborn • Total costs for Dover at full implementation is estimated to be $135,000 ($275 per student based on current enrollment) • Total costs for FY14 is $30,000 • Complete presentation is available on the DS District website

  27. Dover Public School • Questions • Thank you for your continued support for educating our children

  28. DOVER/SHERBORN REGIONAL SCHOOLS FY14 BUDGET Projected Revenues Assessments

  29. Budget Detail Enrollments

  30. Debt Borrowing Items Favorables Challenges

  31. Capital Request: AC for the Middle School • 15-20% of school year >78o in many classrooms • 80o-85o (orange) is common in warm months • Example: one week in June 2010 • Full data at doversherborn.org • Severity and duration unanticipated during planning • Poor working and learning conditions • Contract negotiation issue • No other options (fans, etc) solve the problem • $853,000 capital expense (5 year bonded); approx $10K operating

  32. “Recreational Path Feasibility Study”Presented by Dover Rail Trail Committee

  33. Context Opportunity to Convert the 3.7-Mile Unused Rail Corridor in Dover to a Recreational Path • Working Assumptions: • Appropriate for walking, running, casual bike riding, and skiing • Not paved • Preserve Town’s rural character • Local control • Limited cost to the Town Dover Rail Trail Committee Working on a Feasibility Study to Understand Pros/Cons of the Path • Ad-hoc committee formed in 2011 • At May 2012 Town Meeting, voters approved up to $5,000 for miscellaneous expenses related to the Feasibility Study

  34. Feasibility Study – Key Questions • Is it feasible for Dover to convert the unused rail corridor into a Recreational Path? • Includes financial, environmental, legal, public safety, citizen interest, and community / abutter impact • If yes, then what are the Committee’s recommendations for the range of elements involved in creating the Path? • Considers what would be an appropriate Recreational Path for Dover and how it would be constructed, managed, and maintained 1 2 With the help of interested Dover citizens, the Committee identified over 80 items for review and study

  35. Status Update Rail Trail Committee Activities Status as of March 2013 • Regular meetings with public attendance • Community engagement (web page, email list, abutter mailings, open meetings) • Engagement of Town officials (ConCom, Public Safety, etc.) • Research of other town activities and best practices • Knowledge sharing with Needham and Medfield on similar issues • Draft Feasibility Study, with some remaining questions and issues to explore

  36. Draft Feasibility Study Contents • Recommendations for Town Consideration • Guiding Principles • Surface • Uses • Rules • Construction • Rail Trestle Bridge • Infrastructure • Partnership with “Friends” Group • Governance • Maintenance • Parking • Public Safety • Awareness • Needham and Medfield Coordination • Community Impact • Benefits to Town and Projected Usage • Public Safety • Community and Abutters’ Input • Environmental Impact • Financial and Legal Implications • Projected Costs • Projected Sources of Funding • Legal and Insurance Considerations

  37. Warrant Article Request The Committee Has Identified Five Key Items That Require Additional Research and Professional Expertise 1 Right-of-Way Review • Warrant Article request to fund sufficient due diligence on key items, i.e., hiring external professional expertise • If approved, the Committee will work toward completion of the Feasibility Study in time for the May 2014 Town Meeting, as appropriate 2 MBTA Lease Terms 3 Engineering Analysis 4 Construction Contracting 5 Environmental Review

  38. Who is SPAN-DS? • The Substance Prevention & Awareness Network • in Dover-Sherborn • www.span-ds.org • Since 2002 • Presently includes: Faculty and Administration from both DSMS & DSHS, Superintendent’s office, parents, local law enforcement, clergy, health and business professionals. • Parent Representatives from both towns grades 6 – 12 (approx. 1,200 students)