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Corrective Exercise

Corrective Exercise

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Corrective Exercise

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  1. Corrective Exercise Reed D. Phinisey B.S., C.S.C.S, NSCA-CPT, USAW Strength Training & Conditioning Graduate Assistant Rphinisey@unl.edu

  2. First of all….. • We are all asymmetrical. • One’s corrective plan might not be relevant for someone else. • If it addresses challenges, then it’s corrective!

  3. What is corrective exercise? • Corrective exercise is a individualistic approach where an assessment is used to determine specific weaknesses and/or limitations of the individual. • This assessment drives the programming process, where a systematic and progressive approach is used to reduce the likelihood of injury and improve performance. • The key is Specificity!

  4. Why Corrective Exercise? • Create balance • Improve synergistic capabilities during movement • Reduce likelihood of overuse injuries

  5. What are asymmetries? • Patterns of muscular imbalance. • Tight Muscles=Overused • Outstretched=Weak • Opposing Patterns Ex: Tight Hip Flexors → Outstretched Hip Extensors • Quite natural as we consider the construction of our bodies. (Anatomy/ Respiration) • Developed via repetitive actions or daily living • International Chest Mondays • Long days at work (sitting)

  6. Compensatory Actions • The outcome of muscular imbalance (asymmetries) • Muscle imbalance →movement dysfunction (Compensation). • Muscles prone to tightness generally have a “lowered irritability threshold” and are readily activated with any movement, thus creating abnormal movement patterns. • Effect on recruitment patterns during muscular actions • Dominant muscle groups during synergistic capable movements. • Ex: Quad Dominance → Glute & Hamstring Inhibition (Squatting) • Resulting in overuse injuries & poor movement.

  7. The General Approach (Tissue Level) • We now know that our bodies are asymmetrical to a degree but how do usually approach this challenge? • Unilateral Training, • SMR (Foam Rolling), • Mobility Exercises. • The issue with these techniques are that they only focus at the tissue level with no neural considerations. • We must train the brain! (Recruitment)

  8. The Common Perpetrator Upper/Lower Cross Syndromes (Janda’s Approach) • Resulting in: • Pelvic (Hip) Tilt • Scapular (Shoulder Blade) Instability • Shoulder Impingement • Core Instability

  9. Upper/Lower Cross • Characterized by alternating sides of weakness (inhibition)and overuse (facilitation) in the upper body and lower body.

  10. A Snapshot of Upper/Lower Cross • Stretch the pectoral muscles • Stretch the upper back muscles • Strengthen the middle back • Strengthen the rear shoulder muscles Stretch Strengthen Strengthen Stretch

  11. A Snapshot of Upper/Lower Cross • Strengthen the gluteal muscles • Strengthen the abdominal muscles • Strengthen the hamstrings • Stretch the hip flexor muscles • Stretch the quadriceps muscles (front of the thigh • Stretch the calf muscles • Stretch the low back muscles Stretch Strengthen Stretch Strengthen

  12. Creating a Corrective Exercise Plan: • Assess • Plan • Implement

  13. Assess • The cornerstone of a quality service/program. • Define specific weaknesses/limitations and using this information in program design considerations.

  14. Plan • Defining Needs  Systematic Approach Systematic Approach • Mobility Training • Stability/Motor Control Training • Strength Training

  15. Plan

  16. Personal Training Services

  17. Practical Portion Court #6

  18. Back Page