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Inquiry

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Inquiry

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  1. Inquiry Dr. Dennis S. Kubasko, Jr. EDN 406

  2. Position Statement • Teaching through Inquiry is but one process to engage our students • A powerful tool! • Question strategies • Resources • Different styles • Experienced vs. Novice

  3. Inquiry

  4. Inquiry: Chiappetta • Inquiry-Based Science • Asking questions, resolving discrepancies, figuring out patterns, representing ideas, discussing information, and solving problems • Historical • Late 50’s and early 60’s • Post-Sputnik initiative • 1990’s reform minded recommendation • AAAS, NRC, and DeBoer

  5. Inquiry: Chiappetta • Two Approaches to inquiry • General inquiry: teaching science by inquiry • Finding out about anything and everything • Models scientists • Scientific inquiry: teach science as inquiry • Active student learning and the importance of understanding a scientific topic

  6. Inquiry: Chiappetta • Process rather than content • Questions around student personal interests • Students engage in authentic science process skills: stimulate same thinking patterns scientists use • Discrepant events: puzzling students, causing then to wonder • Inductive activities: Experience before vocabulary • Deductive activities: vocabulary before experience • Gathering information: variety of resources • Problem solving

  7. Inquiry: Hackett • Inquiry: Both Means and Ends • Inquiry as defined by the National Science Education Standards • 1. Teaching Methods and Strategies • 2. Content • Problems with Science Educators • Either / or • Inquiry as a means, understanding subject matter an end • Understanding subject matter as a means, Inquiry as an end

  8. Inquiry: Hackett • Inquiry as an outcome • Attaining student outcomes in science subject matter understanding as an end • Attaining student outcomes in inquiry-based skills and abilities as an end • Full inquiry invokes both inquiry-based skills and abilities and science subject matter understanding as an end • Achieving it all • Science subject matter and scientific inquiry • Guided and structured investigations • Intellectual ownership • Assessments

  9. Inquiry: Martin-Hansen • Defining inquiry • National Research Council (2000): “inquiry into authentic questions generated from student experiences is the central strategy for teaching science.” • Inquiry refers to the work scientists do when they study the natural world, proposing explanations that include evidence gathered from the world around them. • Activities of students: posing questions, planning investigations, and reviewing what experimental evidence is already known

  10. Inquiry: Martin-Hansen • Open or full inquiry • Student-centered approach that begins with a student’s question, followed by a student designing and conducting an investigation or experiment and communicating results • Implementation: • AP or Advanced classes • Small class size • Experienced teachers

  11. Inquiry: Martin-Hansen • Guided inquiry • Teacher chooses the investigation for the student • Teacher assists students develop the questions in class • Implementation: • Can lead into full inquiry • Introduce complex phenomenon • All levels of students, smaller classes

  12. Inquiry: Martin-Hansen • Coupled inquiry • Combines a guided inquiry investigation with an open-inquiry investigation • 5 steps: Invitation to inquiry, guided inquiry, open inquiry, inquiry resolution, assessment • Implementation: • Upper levels of students: Large classes • Lower levels of students: Small classes

  13. Inquiry: Martin-Hansen • Structured inquiry • Directed inquiry by the teacher • Cookbook lesson implementation • Endpoint or product is known • Limited student engagement • Implementation: • All levels: Large classes • Teacher can take away components • Beginning of the teacher evolution process

  14. Inquiry: Koballa et al. • The Spectrum of Scientific Literacy: Koballa • NSES defines scientific literacy as “the knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts and processes required for personal decision making, participation in civic and cultural affairs and economic productivity.” • Educational goal? Something achievable by all students at the end of a period of instruction

  15. Inquiry: Koballa et al. • Three-dimensional framework • 1. Level of scientific literacy • Range of understanding and abilities that enable people to function to different degrees in our scientific orientated world • Seven levels • Figure 1: DNA • Figure 2: General • Expectations now? Levels IV or V on many science related topics • Novice teacher verses experienced teacher • Where should we expect our students to be?

  16. Inquiry: Koballa et al. • Multiple Domains • Profile of teacher understanding • Biology, Physics, EES, Chemistry • Student profiles • Scientific Literacy as a value • Different degrees of value for scientific literacy • Social-cultural issue…does society have a need for scientific literacy? • Cloning? Stem-cell research? Missile defense system? Global warming? • Life-long objective