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Safety # 5 Fire Safety and Hazmat

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Safety # 5 Fire Safety and Hazmat

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  1. Safety # 5Fire Safety and Hazmat Series of Safety Presentations include: 1 = Facility 2 = Shop Equipment + Tools 3 = Vehicle Lifting 4 = Personal Protective Equipment 5 = Fire Safety + Hazmat

  2. Did I check that fuel line for leaks?

  3. FIRE BLANKETS • Fire blankets are required to be available in the shop areas. FIGURE 1-13 A treated wool blanket is kept in this easy-to-open wall-mounted holder and should be placed in a centralized location in the shop.

  4. Fire Hazards and Prevention • Fuels used in modern ICE are highly volatile and require proper handling and storage. • Diesel fuel is not as refined and contain active micro-organisms that can cause infections. • Cleaning solvents and shop rags must be stored and handled properly to prevent fires.

  5. Classes of Fires • Class “A” fires • Ordinary combustibles such as wood, paper, and plastics. • Class “B” fires • Flammable liquids such as gasoline, oil, grease, and paint. • Class “C” fires • Electrical equipment such as electric motors, wiring, and fuse boxes. • Class “D” fires • Combustible metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and potassium.

  6. Fire Safety • Make sure fire extinguishers are accessible and maintained. • Do not fight a fire that is too large to control. Get out of the building.

  7. FIRE EXTINGUISHERS FIGURE 1-11 A typical fire extinguisher designed to be used on class A,B, or C fires. FIGURE 1-12 A CO2 fire extinguisher being used on a fire set in an open steel drum during a demonstration at a fire department training center.

  8. FIRE EXTINGUISHERS • There are four classes of fire extinguishers. Each class should be used on specific fires only: • Class A is designed for use on general combustibles, such as cloth, paper, and wood. • Class B is designed for use on flammable liquids and greases, including gasoline, oil, thinners, and solvents. • Class C is used only on electrical fires. • Class D is effective only on combustible metals such as powdered aluminum, sodium, or magnesium.

  9. Fire extinguishers can be Class A, B, C, or D. Many are ABC or multipurpose extinguishers Most use “Dry Chemical”

  10. KNOWLEDGE CHECK Technician A says class A fires consist of burning liquid. Technician B says water should be used to extinguish class B fires. Who is correct? • Technician A only • Technician B only • Both Technicians A and B • Neither Technician A nor B • D = Neither Technicians

  11. Steps in Using a Fire Extinguisher 1. Pull pin from handle. 2. Aim nozzle at base of fire. 3. Squeeze handle. 4. Sweep entire width of fire.

  12. KNOWLEDGE CHECK Which of the following is not recommended for use when trying to extinguish flammable liquid fires? • Foam • Carbon dioxide • Water • Dry Chemical • C - Water

  13. KNOWLEDGE CHECK • Technician A says a dry chemical fire extinguisher can be used on class A, B and C fires. Technician B says the chemical used in these fire extinguishers can be corrosive. Who is correct? • Technician A only • Technician B only • Both Technicians A and B • Neither Technician A nor B • C = Both Technicians

  14. KNOWLEDGE CHECK Technician A says that water based fire extinguishers remove oxygen from the fire. Technician B says that CO2 fire extinguishers remove oxygen from the fire. Who is correct? • Technician A only • Technician B only • Both Technicians A and B • Neither Technician A nor B • B = Technician B only

  15. KNOWLEDGE CHECK Which type of fire extinguisher is usable for most types of fires? • CO2 • Dry chemical • Water • CO Answer: B Dry chemical

  16. KNOWLEDGE CHECK • What is the correct procedure for using a fire extinguisher to put out a fire? • Pull • Aim • Squeeze • Sweep

  17. KNOWLEDGE CHECK When using a fire extinguisher, what word can be used to remember what to do? • PASS • FIRE • RED • LEVER Answer: A - PASS

  18. Fire Safety(continued) • Store oily rags in a covered container. • Store gasoline safely in an approved container.

  19. Gasoline

  20. Gasoline is: • Highly flammable • Volatile – heavier than air (fumes to ground) • Needs oxygen to burn • MUST be stored in approved container • Container should be “red” in color • Never smoke around open containers • Rags soaked in gas should be taken outside to dry before you dispose of them • Provide proper ventilation

  21. KNOWLEDGE CHECK Technician A says all metal gasoline containers are considered safety cans. Technician B says all gasoline containers should be red in color. Who is correct? • Technician A only • Technician B only • Both Technicians A and B • Neither Technician A nor B • B = B Technician only

  22. KNOWLEDGE CHECK Rules to remember when using gasoline include each of the following EXCEPT: • Use quick dry to absorb any spills • Store gasoline in approved containers • Keep gasoline away from sources of heat • Never use gasoline as a cleaning solvent • A = Don’t use quick dry to absorb fuel – the quick dry may become flammable.

  23. KNOWLEDGE CHECK Technician A says all gasoline containers should be OSHA approved and painted red. Technician B says the MSDS contains information about health and safety concerns associated with chemicals used in the shop. Who is correct? • Technician A • Technician B • Both Technicians A and B • Neither Technician A nor B • C = Both Technicians

  24. Breathing Safety Take precautions against breathing: • Paint fumes. • Asbestos. • Cleaning chemicals. • Grinding dust. • Vehicle exhaust.

  25. Brake and Clutch Service

  26. Asbestos • Identified as a health hazard • Can lead to cancer – mesothelioma • When breathed, fibers can cause scarring of the lung tissue • All asbestos waste must be disposed of in accordance with OSHA and EPA regulations

  27. ASBESTOS OSHA STANDARDS & REGULATIONS • The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established three levels of asbestos exposure. • Any vehicle service establishment that does either brake or clutch work must limit employee exposure to asbestos to less than 0.2 fibers per cubic centimeter (cc) as determined by an air sample. • The federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established procedures for the removal and disposal of asbestos. • The EPA procedures require that products containing asbestos be “wetted” to prevent the asbestos fibers from becoming airborne.

  28. ASBESTOS HANDLING GUIDELINES • The air in the shop area can be tested by a testing laboratory, but this can be expensive. • Tests have determined that asbestos levels can easily be kept below the recommended levels by using a solvent or a special vacuum. • HEPA Vacuum • Solvent Spray • Disposal of Brake Dust and Brake Shoes FIGURE 2-2 All brakes should be moistened with water or solvent to help prevent brake dust from becoming airborne.

  29. THE DANGERS OF EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS • Asbestos exposure can cause scar tissue to form in the lungs. • This condition is called asbestosis. It gradually causes increasing shortness of breath, and the scarring to the lungs is permanent.

  30. KNOWLEDGE CHECK Technician A says that asbestos is found in some brake pad materials. Technician B says that asbestos is found in some clutch materials. Who is correct? • Technician A only • Technician B only • Both Technicians A and B • Neither Technician A nor B • C = Both Technicians

  31. KNOWLEDGE CHECK When removing asbestos from parts, Technician A believes a vacuum system should be used. Technicians B believes dust should be blown away using compressed air. Who is correct? • Technician A • Technician B • Both Technicians A and B • Neither Technician A nor B • A= Use vacuum with HEPA filter

  32. KNOWLEDGE CHECK Technician A says wet asbestos is known as hazardous waste. Technician B says dry asbestos is known as solid waste. Who is correct? • Technician A only • Technician B only • Both Technicians A and B • Neither Technician A nor B • B= B Technician only

  33. KNOWLEDGE CHECK Technician A says all brake and clutch linings should be treated as if they contain asbestos. Technician B says a HEPA filtration vacuum is acceptable to clean brake assemblies before service. Who is correct? • Technician A only • Technician B only • Both Technicians A and B • Neither Technician A nor B • C = Both Technicians

  34. KNOWLEDGE CHECK Technician A says a visual inspection can determine if brake linings contain asbestos. Technician B says it is OK to blow brake dust with compressed air. Who is correct? • Technician A only • Technician B only • Both Technicians A and B • Neither Technician A nor B • D = Neither Technician

  35. KNOWLEDGE CHECK Exposure to asbestos dust can cause which of the following conditions? • Asbestosis • Mesothelioma • Lung cancer • All of the above are possible Answer: D – All of the above

  36. KNOWLEDGE CHECK Wetted asbestos dust is considered to be _____. • Solid waste • Hazardous waste • Toxic • Poisonous Answer: A – Solid Waste

  37. Toxic Materials and Chemicals • Asbestos is not banned from imported brake linings. • Take appropriate measures to avoid breathing any brake or clutch dust. • Even non-asbestos linings have dangerous materials.

  38. SOLVENT HAZARDOUS AND REGULATORY STATUS FIGURE 2-5 Typical fireproof flammable storage cabinet. WHAT EVERY TECHNICIAN SHOULD KNOW The Hazardous Material Identification Guide (HMIG) is the standard labeling for all materials.

  39. Hazardous Materials • Always read the label and MSDS before using unfamiliar substances. • Be familiar with the dangers of various substances used in the shop. • Follow all environmental policies for proper disposal.

  40. WHAT EVERY TECHNICIAN SHOULD KNOW FIGURE 2-11 The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Hazardous Materials Identification Guide is a standardized listing of the hazards and the protective equipment needed.

  41. MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS • All hazardous materials must be properly labeled, and information about each hazardous material must be posted on Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) available from the manufacturer. FIGURE 2-1 Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) should be readily available for use by anyone in the area who may come into contact with hazardous materials.

  42. KNOWLEDGE CHECK Where can complete EPA lists of hazardous wastes be found? • Code of Federal Regulations • Gasoline is ____________ • highly volatile • highly flammable • dangerous, especially in vapor form • All of the above • D – All of the above

  43. HAZARDOUS WASTE • Hazardous waste materials are chemicals, or components, that the shop no longer needs that pose a danger to the environment and people if they are disposed of in ordinary garbage cans or sewers. • The EPA considers waste hazardous if it is included on the EPA list of hazardous materials, or it has one or more of the following characteristics. • Reactive • Corrosive • Toxic • Ignitable • Radioactive

  44. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT • The U.S Congress passed the Occupational Safety and Health Act in 1970. • Since approximately 25% of workers are exposed to health and safety hazards on the job, the standards are necessary to monitor, control, and educate workers regarding health and safety in the workplace.

  45. RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) • Federal and state laws control the disposal of hazardous waste materials. • The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) states that hazardous material users are responsible for hazardous materials from the time they become a waste until the proper waste disposal is completed.

  46. RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) • The RCRA controls these types of automotive waste: • Paint and body repair products waste • Solvents for parts and equipment cleaning • Batteries and battery acid • Mild acids used for metal cleaning and preparation • Waste oil, and engine coolants or antifreeze • Air-conditioning refrigerants and oils • Engine oil filters • The right-to-know laws state that employees have a right to know when the materials they use at work are hazardous. • The right-to-know laws started with the Hazard Communication Standard published by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1983.

  47. CLEAN AIR ACT • Air-conditioning (A/C) systems and refrigerant are regulated by the Clean Air Act (CAA), Title VI, Section 609.

  48. KNOWLEDGE CHECK Hazardous materials include all of the following, except _____. • Engine oil • Asbestos • Water • Brake cleaner Answer: C - Water

  49. KNOWLEDGE CHECK To determine if a product or substance being used is hazardous, consult _____. • A dictionary • An MSDS • SAE standards • EPA guidelines Answer: B- MSDS