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Why Cycling Matters

Why Cycling Matters

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Why Cycling Matters

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  1. Why Cycling Matters Philip Wu, MD Department of Pediatrics Community Health Initiative Kaiser Permanente Northwest

  2. Key Messages • Much of 21st century human disease is preventable; physical inactivity is the major culprit • Physical inactivity drives rising health care costs • Physical activity (and cycling) should be a part of everyday life • Cycling reduces VMT, mitigates climate change, and improves health

  3. What Should You Do • Use the health message to broaden your appeal and accomplish your goals • Partner with those outside the cycling community (including the health sector)

  4. Why You Should Do It Human Health Physical, Mental, Social, Spiritual Economic Costs of Medical Care, Transportation, Fuel, Infrastructure Environment Climate Change, Air Quality, Plant and Animal Habitat Regional Quality of Life, Branding and Tourism

  5. “…integrating health-enhancing choices into transportation policy has the potential to save lives by preventing chronic diseases, reducing and preventing motor-vehicle-related injury and deaths, improving environmental health, while stimulating economic development, and ensuring access for all people.” Centers for Disease Control

  6. Today’s AgendaHow Physical Activity (aka cycling)… • Prevents illness and disease • Promotes longevity • Improves quality of life • Is a specific cost-effective intervention

  7. 7

  8. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

  9. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1986 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

  10. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1987 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

  11. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1988 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

  12. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1989 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

  13. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

  14. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

  15. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

  16. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

  17. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

  18. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

  19. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

  20. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%

  21. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%

  22. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%

  23. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%

  24. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2001 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

  25. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2002 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

  26. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2003 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

  27. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2004 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

  28. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2005 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

  29. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2006 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

  30. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2007 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

  31. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2008 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

  32. How Active Are We?

  33. Obesity-related Health Spending Reaches $147 Billion • 91% of all medical spending • Includes treatment of” • Diabetes and heart disease • Hypertension • Stroke • Breast, colorectal, endometrial, and kidney cancers • Sleep apnea HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, July, 2009 42

  34. Obesity-Related Healthcare CostsHospitalizations 2-19 yrs of age* Primary and secondary diagnosis of obesity and obesity-related conditions including asthma, diabetes, gallbladder disease, skin infections, pregnancy complications, depression, other mental health disorders • 1999: 21,743 $126 million • 2005: 42,429 $238 million *Health Affairs, 2009

  35. Healthcare Costs in California2006 • Total annual estimated cost to CA for overweight/obesity and physical inactivity: • $41.2 billion • Healthcare costs: • $20.7 billion • $12.8 billion for obesity • $7.9 billion for physical inactivity • Lost productivity costs: • $20.5 billion • $8.2 billion for obesity • $12.3 billion for physical inactivity *California Center for Public Health Advocacy, 2006

  36. Physical Activity Prevents Illness and DiseaseCRF and Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in Healthy Men Incidence Per 1000 men Cardiorespiratory Fitness Wei M et al. Ann Int Med 1999

  37. Physical Activity Prevents Illness and Disease CRF and Risk of Incident Hypertension in Healthy Women Multivariable relative risk for hypertension p for trend < 0.01 Fitness Categories Barlow CE et al. Am J Epidemiol 2006; 163:142-50

  38. Physical Activity Prevents Illness and DiseasePhysical Activity, and Hip Fracture Risk Adjusted relative risk for hip fracture p for trend <0.001 MET hours/week Feskanich D et al. JAMA 2002; 288:2300

  39. Physical Activity Prevents Illness and DiseaseMortality in CAD-Dose Relationship 30 min. Most days Janssen I & Jolliffe CJ. MSSE 2006; 38:418

  40. Physical Activity Promotes LongevityRisk of Death by Fitness Groups in Women and Men 60 years+ Relative risk adjusted for age and risk factors Cardiorespiratory Fitness Blair & Wei. Am J Health Prom 2000; 15:1-8