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  1. Elementary School Essentials CAO Meeting February 2013 Dr. Andrews Chief Academic Officer

  2. Dr. Frank Rodriguez, Assistant Superintendent Quality Assurance Mark Howard, Director Research, Evaluation, and Assessment elementary School accountability

  3. How many changes to the FDOE Accountability system in 2012? • 9 • 17 • 23 • 34 Correct Answer 34!

  4. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GRADING MATRIX

  5. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GRADE ACCOUNTABILITY PERFORMANCE, LOWEST 25% LEARNING GAINS • FY2013 • Reading Performance Penalty • Science – FCAT 2.0 • FCAT 2.0 Achievement Levels • Writing – 3.5 Score, 60 Minutes • Lowest 25% Adequate Progress Penalty Reinstated Grade Scale for Elementary Schools (Based on a 800-Point Scale)

  6. ACCOUNTABLE STUDENTS • ELLs with at least 365 calendar days from initial day of entry into U.S. school* • FCAT 2.0 • Reading • Mathematics • Writing • Science *365 days: Initial day of entry to first day of FCAT 2.0 Writing testing – February 26, 2013

  7. Emergent Achieved Commended 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 READING PERFORMANCE (100 pts) • One (1) point for each percent of eligible students scoring • FCAT 2.0 Achievement Scale Levels 3+ • FAA Scale Levels 4+ At least 30 students with valid reading scores

  8. READING PERFORMANCE (100 pts) • Reading Performance Threshold Penalty • School grade lowered one letter grade if 25% Reading Performance threshold not met • Schools that have their grade lowered for not meeting other targets (e.g., Adequate Progress of the Lowest 25%, At-risk Graduation Rate) will not have their grade lowered further.

  9. Reading: Percent ProficientFY12 Spring to FY13 Winter Diag Difference All Students Tested

  10. MATH PERFORMANCE (100 pts) • One (1) point for each percent of eligible students scoring • FACT 2.0 Achievement Scale Levels 3+ • FAA Scale Levels 4+ At least 30 students with valid mathematics scores

  11. FCAT Math 2.0: Percent Proficient FY12 Spring to FY13 Winter Diag Difference All Students Tested

  12. SCIENCE PERFORMANCE (100 pts) • One (1) point for each percent of eligible students scoring • FCAT 2.0 Achievement Scale Levels 3+ • FAA Scale Levels 4+ • New Grade 5 FCAT 2.0 Science Achievement Levels

  13. Grade 5 Science FCAT 2.0: Percent ProficientFY12 Spring to FY13 Winter Diag Difference All Students Tested

  14. WRITING PERFORMANCE (100 pts) • One (1) point for each percent of eligible students scoring • FCAT Writing Scores 3.5+ • FAA Scale Levels 4+ • 60 minutes • Expanded expectations

  15. FY12 Grade 4 FCAT 2.0 WritingPercent Scoring 3.5 and 3.0 Difference

  16. READING LEARNING GAINS (100 pts) • FCAT 2.0 (1 point) • Maintain same proficient level • L1 to L2, L1 to L3, or L2 to L3 • Remain L1 & increase Required scale points • Remain L2 & increase Required scale points Retained students make learning gains by maintaining a proficiency level, increasing a level, or increasing a scale score

  17. READING LEARNING GAINS (100 pts) • FCAT 2.0 Weighted (1.1 or 1.2 point) • (1.1) Prior year level 1 or 2 & gain Requiredplus 33% or more scale points see example • (1.1) Move from lower level into L4 • (1.2) Move from lower level into L5 1.1 1.2 Retained students make learning gains by maintaining a proficiency level, increasing a level, or increasing a scale score Level 5 Level 4

  18. READING LEARNING GAINS (100 pts) • Weighted Learning Gain for retained and non-retained students prior year in FCAT 2.0 L1 or L2 • Learning Gain of 1.1 = Required growth + 33% or more Example: Current year fourth grader, prior year level 1 third grader Required growth (12) points + 33% (4 points) 12 + 4 = 16 scale points

  19. READING LEARNING GAINS (100 pts) • FAA (1 point) • Maintain proficient (Levels 4-9) • Improve from prior Level • Remain Levels 1-3 & gain 5 or more scale points (Required) • FAA Weighted (1.1 point) • Prior year levels 1-3 & gain Required plus 33% or more (7+) scale points

  20. MATH LEARNING GAINS (100 pts) • FCAT 2.0 (1 point) • Maintain proficient (L3-L5) • Improve from L1 to L2, L1 to L3, or L2 to L3 • Remain L1 & increase common scale score • Remain L2 & increase common scale score Retained students make learning gains by maintaining a proficiency level, increasing a level, or increasing a scale score

  21. MATH LEARNING GAINS (100 pts) • FCAT 2.0 Weighted (1.1 or 1.2 point) • (1.1) Prior year level 1 or 2 & gain Requiredplus 33% or more scale points see example • (1.1) Move from lower level into L4 • (1.2) Move from lower level into L5 1.1 1.2 Retained students make learning gains by maintaining a proficiency level, increasing a level, or increasing a scale score Level 5 Level 4

  22. MATH LEARNING GAINS (100 pts) • FAA (1 point) • Maintain proficient (Levels 4-9) • Improve from prior Level • Remain Levels 1-3 & gain 5 or more scale points (Required) • FAA Weighted (1.1 point) • Prior year levels 1-3 & gain Required plus 33% or more (7+) scale points

  23. MATH LEARNING GAINS (100 pts) • Weighted Learning Gain for retained and non-retained students prior year FCAT 2.0 L1 or L2 • Learning Gain of 1.1 = Required growth + 33% or more Example: Current year fourth grader, prior year level 1 third grader Required growth (16) points + 33% (5.28 points) 16 + 6 = 22 scale points

  24. LOWEST 25% LEARNING GAINS (200 pts) • Calculating Low 25% • Only students in L1 or L2 • Calculate for each student group • The sum of all groups plus other retained students in prior year L1 and L2 Fewer than 30 students L2 or below, reading and mathematics gains of all students substituted *Students who skip a grade will show Learning Gains by moving up a level or maintaining L3+

  25. LOWEST 25% LEARNING GAINS (100 pts) • Lowest 25% Adequate Progress • At least 50 percent of the Lowest 25% (50% in Reading and 50% in Mathematics) make Learning Gains or show improvement from the prior year: • Lowest 25% Adequate Progress Penalty

  26. SUMMMARY OF CHANGES: PERFORMANCE, LOWEST 25% LEARNING GAINS • FY2013 • Science – FCAT 2.0 • New Achievement Levels • Writing – 3.5 Score, 60 Minutes • Reading Performance Penalty • Lowest 25% Progress Penalty Reinstated

  27. For Additional Support Contact Mark Howard, Director PX: 48781 Nancy Brito, Specialist PX: 47521 http://www.palmbeachschools.org/assessment/SchoolGrade.asp

  28. Keith Oswald, Assistant Superintendent Curriculum and Instruction Strategies and resources

  29. Elementary Essentials CAO February 5, 2013

  30. Writing Best Practices for Test Readiness • Students write every day and teachers read students’ writing every day to determine areas of weakness and trends in writing. • Provide prescriptive feedback to students and monitor progress. • Teach strategic minilessons based on class needs. • Pull children together for small group instruction based on similar need. • Confer with individual students. • Utilize the Test-Taking unit in Learning Village for planning. • Utilize the tutorial links on the 4th grade scope in Learning Village.

  31. FY12 FCAT 2.0 Writing Elementary School The minimum goal for students needs to remain a 4 as at least one scorer needs to believe the essay is a 4 in order to earn a 3.5. FY12 State Note: In Palm Beach County, there was a 30 point difference between 3s a 3.5s last year. FY12 Palm Beach County

  32. Moving NARRATIVE Writers Forward

  33. If the writer is a level 1,I could teach… If the writer is a level 2, I could teach… Focusing closely on the topic of the prompt Focusing closely on the topic of daily writing Organizing in a beginning, middle & end pattern Adding support to elaborate Writing sentences with a “who” & a “did what” Spelling word wall words correctly Using end punctuation • Focusing closely on the topic of the prompt • Focusing closely on the topic of daily writing • Organizing in a beginning, middle & end pattern. • Adding support to elaborate • Writing sentences with a “who” & a “did what” • Spelling word wall words correctly

  34. If the writer is a level 3, I could teach… If the writer is a level 4, I could teach… Determining the most important part of the story Eliminating extraneous parts Organizing step by step Developing scenes (events) with specific actions, dialogue, internal thinking, feelings All of the conventions from level 3 • Taking away any extraneous parts • Organizing in scenes • Making a clearer beginning & ending • Adding support to elaborate • Writing sentences with simple and compound construction • Spelling word wall words correctly • Using end punctuation correctly • Choosing stronger verbs/specific nouns

  35. If the writer is a level 5, I could teach… If the writer is a level 6, I could teach… Strengthening all of the level 5 components This piece will cause the reader to envision scenes through specific elaboration and word choice • Further development of scenes with specific actions, meaningful dialogue, internal thinking & feelings, and figurative language • Purposeful vocabulary use • Various sentence structures • More purposeful use of punctuation

  36. Moving EXPOSITORY Writers Forward

  37. If the writer is a level 1,I could teach…to move to level 2 If the writer is a level 2, I could teach…to move to a level 3 Focusing closely on the topic of the prompt and in daily writing topics Organizing by introducing the topic, supplying two or more reasons, ways, or kinds of, and concluding the writing Elaborating on the support with sensory details Writing sentences that make sense and sound complete Spelling word wall words correctly, and using basic spelling patterns for chunks of words Using end punctuation & capitalization Writing with a “teaching voice,” not a “telling voice” • Focusing more closely on the topic of the prompt and daily writing topics • Organizing by introducing the topic, supplying one or more reasons, ways, or kinds of, and concluding the writing • Using simple transitions • Adding facts or examples to support ideas • Writing sentences with a “who or what” that did something • Spelling word wall words correctly • Writing with a “teaching voice,” not a “telling voice”

  38. If the writer is a level 3, I could teach…to move to a level 4 If the writer is a level 4, I could teach…to move to a level 5 Crafting a strong introduction that previews the ideas to be addressed Crafting a concluding paragraph that includes the writer’s thoughts or feelings about the topic Eliminating extraneous parts Organizing ideas by importance Using effective transitions between and within paragraphs Including anecdotes that are angled to match the thesis, and provide sufficient elaboration to create a strong connection A variety of sentence structures Specific and meaningful word choice Attention to subject/verb agreement • Taking away any extraneous information • Organizing with 2 or more reasons, ways or kinds of • Crafting a stronger introduction & conclusion • Using effective transitions between paragraphs • Adding support to elaborate • Examples with elaboration • Anecdotes carefully crafted to show how it supports the idea • Writing sentences with simple and compound construction • Using word knowledge and word wall to spell words correctly • Using end punctuation correctly • Choosing stronger verbs/specific nouns

  39. If the writer is a level 5, I could teach…to move to a level 6 If the writer is a level 6, I could teach… Strengthening all of the level 5 components This piece will cause the reader to envision ideas through specific elaboration and word choice • Further development of support and elaboration. Each reason, way or kind of, could be supported in multiple ways (definitions, anecdotes, facts, quotes, etc.) • Purposeful vocabulary use • Various sentence structures • More purposeful use of punctuation

  40. Make Way for Reading

  41. Getting Started • Winter diagnostic results aligned to FCAT tested benchmarks. • Look closely at the data. • Use Item Specifications to see how the FCAT might phrase questions per benchmark.

  42. Elementary Resources • Learning Village • Elementary • FY12 Reading • Grade Level • Scope

  43. CAUTION

  44. Independent Reading • Increase the amount of sustained independent reading. • At the beginning of the day • End of the day • Beyond the reading block Volume and stamina are the key to success.

  45. Reader and TaskTen Guiding Principles Make close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons. Provide scaffolding that does not preempt or replace text. Ask text dependent questions from a range of question types. Emphasize students’ supporting answers based upon evidence from the text. Provide extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).

  46. Reader and TaskTen Guiding Principles Offer regular opportunities for students to share ideas, evidence, and research. Offer systematic instruction in vocabulary. Ensure wide reading from complex text that varies in length. 9. Provide explicit instruction in applied grammar and conventions. 10. Cultivate students’ independence.

  47. Administrative Considerations • Capitalize on teachers’ strengths. • Utilize data to monitor progress. • Classroom Assessments • Core K12 • Diagnostics • Focus on the curriculum and the resources available in Learning Village. • Maintain a balance between instruction and test prep.