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Chapter 1 Introduction to the Atmosphere

Chapter 1 Introduction to the Atmosphere

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Chapter 1 Introduction to the Atmosphere

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  1. Chapter 1Introduction to the Atmosphere ATMO 1300 Spring 2010

  2. “Weather” vs. “Climate” • Weather – Short-term variations in the sensible state of the atmosphere (e.g., hot today, rain over the weekend, etc…) • METEOROLOGY – The study of weather • Climate – Long-term state of the atmosphere (e.g., global warming) • CLIMATOLOGY – The study of climate • The link between meteorology and climatology…

  3. The source of energy for our atmosphere is the sun! • Drives existence and motion of weather systems

  4. General Characteristics of the Atmosphere • The atmosphere is a 3-dimensional fluid

  5. General Characteristics of the Atmosphere • Very shallow depth (relative sense) • Figure from www.met.tamu.edu/class/metr452/models/2001/global.gif

  6. General Characteristics of the Atmosphere • No defined top • Has mass, therefore weight, due to gravity • Mainly composed of invisible gasmolecules and aerosols

  7. Q: Which scenario is correct upon combining air masses of different densities? LESS DENSE (WARM) HEIGHT MORE DENSE (COLD) This is a STABLE situation (something has to happen externally to overturn it) That something is WEATHER! Example: Think of a pot of water on the stove… why do hot air balloons fly?

  8. COLD COLD COLD HOT UNSTABLE situation, air is less dense underneath more dense air. Atmosphere always wants to achieve stability. To do, so which way must cold/warm air move? WEATHER exists to remove the imbalance. In this case, thermal imbalance leads to a thunderstorm. (Much) more later… just wait

  9. Permanent Atmospheric Gases • Nitrogen (N2) – 78% • Oxygen (O2) – 21% • Argon (Ar) – 1%

  10. Variable Gases • Water Vapor (H2O) (varies from ~ 0-4%) • Carbon Dioxide (CO2) • Ozone (O3)

  11. Ozone (O3) • Mainly found in the Stratosphere (a beneficial shield), but can often be found in the Troposphere (a harmful pollutant). • Ozone absorbs UV radiation from the sun • Photochemical reactions determine development and destruction of ozone: Creation: O2→ O + O O2 + O + M = O3 + M Depletion (need ChloroFluoroCarbons, CFCs): CFCl3 + UV radiation = CFCl2 + Cl Cl + O3 = ClO + O2ClO + O = Cl + O2

  12. Fig. 1-8, p. 10

  13. Fig. 1-9, p. 11

  14. Carbon Dioxide • Controlling factor on temperature (greenhouse gas) • Increase since 1950s (intense debate regarding link to global warming) • Sources include: animal respiration and combustion.

  15. Fig. 1-3, p. 6

  16. Fig. 1-4, p. 7

  17. Important Facts About Water Vapor

  18. Water Vapor – the “other” greenhouse gas • An invisible gas • Gaseous phase of water If you can see it, it’s not water vapor!

  19. Water Vapor • An invisible gas • Gaseous phase of water If you can see it, it’s not water vapor! • Referred to as atmospheric moisture • Greatest concentration in lower atmosphere (near surface of the Earth) WHY?

  20. Water Vapor • How does water vapor get into the atmosphere? • By a process called EVAPORATION • Liquid water to water vapor Called a change of phase

  21. Gas vs. Liquid Gas Liquid

  22. Fig. 1-5, p. 8

  23. Sources of Water Vaporleft photo from webworld98.com; right photo from killamfarms.com EVAPORATION TRANSPIRATION

  24. Importance of Water Vapor • Necessary for clouds to form (clouds are composed of LIQUID water droplets – CONDENSATION necessary!) • Controlling factor on temperature (greenhouse gas) • Phase transformations are a huge source of energy in the atmosphere • Energy from latent heat release (condensation) in a thunderstorm is on the order of a 1 kiloton nuclear bomb!

  25. Aerosols • Small (microscopic) solid particles (e.g., clay, silver iodide, organic material) • Combustion by-products, sea spray, dust • Act as condensation nuclei • the beginning of the precipitation process • Affects health, visibility, optical effects

  26. Blowing Dust in Lubbock Welcome to Lubbock, those of you who are new to the area…

  27. Fig. 1-11, p. 12

  28. Vertical Structure of the Atmosphere • Vertical Distribution of Mass • Vertical Distribution of Temperature

  29. Vertical Distribution of Mass • Density = mass per unit volume • Density decreases with increasing altitude • Figure from apollo.lsc.vsc.edu/classes/met130

  30. Atmospheric Pressure • Pressure = Force per unit Area • Related to Density Its how much “stuff” is above you Stuff= atmosphere

  31. Pressure Change with Height • Like density, pressure decreases with increasing altitude. • It does so at a greater rate in the lower atmosphere • Here in Lubbock…we are at about 3300 ft (about 1 km) elevation

  32. Hurricane Katrina at its peak: 902 mb Hurricane Wilma at its peak: 882 mb – all time record low for Atlantic Fig. 1-13, p. 15

  33. Ideal Gas Law • Part of the Physics that governs the atmosphere… • Atmosphere or air can be thought of as an “ideal” or “perfect” gas and follows a simple relation Pressure x Volume = constant x Temperature Or Pressure = R x Density x Temperature R=287.05 J/kg K

  34. Vertical Distribution of Temperature • Average temperature distribution • FOUR layers • Temperature trend determines atmospheric layers – NOT A FIXED DEPTH!

  35. Troposphere • Where most “weather” occurs

  36. TroposphereFigure from www.atmos.ucla.edu/AS3 • Temperature decreases with height Amount of temperature decrease with height (e.g., -10 deg C / km) called a Lapse Rate Strong cooling with height VERY important for development of thunderstorms!

  37. Troposphere • Depth varies with latitude (greatest over tropics) and season (greatest in summer)

  38. Stratosphere • Temperature increases with height – called an Inversion • Contains Ozone (i.e., the “ozone layer”) • Not much “weather” occurs

  39. Tropopause • Boundary between the Troposphere and Stratosphere

  40. Mesosphere/Thermosphere • Mesosphere – cooling with height • Thermosphere – warming with height (inversion)

  41. The Ionosphere • Upper Mesosphere into Thermosphere • Contains electrically charged particles called IONS • Figure from apollo.lsc.vsc.edu/classes.met130

  42. The Ionosphere • Affects radio transmissions D layer absorbs AM radio waves D layer disappears at night, E,F layers reflect AM radio waves back to earth • Figure from apollo.lac.vsc.edu/classes/met130

  43. The Ionosphere • Where Aurora Borealis (northern lights) occurs • Photo from climate.gi.alaska.edu/Curtis

  44. End of Chapter 1