html5-img
1 / 31

Using Technology to Benefit Students

Using Technology to Benefit Students. Meredith College Raleigh, N.C. February 24, 2003. David G. Brown, Professor/VP/Dean/Former Provost Wake Forest University http://www.wfu.edu/~brown brown@wfu.edu. How has the computer changed teaching and learning?. It’s caused every teacher to

hilliard
Télécharger la présentation

Using Technology to Benefit Students

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author. Content is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use only. Download presentation by click this link. While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server. During download, if you can't get a presentation, the file might be deleted by the publisher.

E N D

Presentation Transcript


  1. Using Technology to Benefit Students Meredith College Raleigh, N.C. February 24, 2003 David G. Brown, Professor/VP/Dean/Former Provost Wake Forest University http://www.wfu.edu/~brown brown@wfu.edu

  2. How has the computer changed teaching and learning? • It’s caused every teacher to • rethink & redesign. • 2. By increasing student options, it has increased competition and compelled universities to pay more attention to the quality of teaching Our profession has been changed forever!

  3. Outline of Remarks 1. What have I done with my own course? 2. What general principles shaped my course? 3. How are YOU manifesting these same principles? 4. Is all this work with it? 5. What about the future? 6. YOUR comments, reactions, questions

  4. FIRST YEAR SEMINARThe Economists’ Way of Thinking: • To understand a liberal arts education as an opportunity to study with professors who think by their own set of concepts • To learn how to apply economic concepts • To learn how to work collaboratively • To learn computer skills • To improve writing and speaking Students = 15 All Freshmen Required Course Before Class During Class. After Class

  5. Before Class Students Find URLs & Identify Criteria Interactive exercises Muddiest Point Lecture Notes E-mail dialogue Cybershows During Class One Minute Quiz Computer Tip Talk Class Polls Team Projects After Class Edit Drafts by Team Guest Editors Hyperlinks & Pictures Access Previous Papers Other Daily Announcements Team Web Page Personal Web Pages Exams include Computer Portfolio Materials Forever Brown’s First Year Seminar ICCEL -- Wake Forest University, 2003

  6. Reasons 150 Professors Added Computer Enhancements • Communication-Interaction • Collaboration-Teams • Controversy-Debate • Customization-Diversity • Consultants-Adjuncts www.ankerpub.com/books/brown.html www.ablongman.com/professional/catalog/academic/product/1,4096,0205355803,00.html

  7. Communication-Interaction • 1247 emails • Announcements • Muddiest • One Minute Quiz • Reaction to Talk • Student Profiles Blackboard

  8. Collaboration-Teams • Professors Share Resource Materials • Students Study Together • Departments Create Shared Databases • Examples--- • 2 Students Submit 1 Answer • Edit Rough Draft Papers • PowerPoint in Class • Listserv Between Classes • Public Web Page

  9. Controversy-Debate • Cross-Culture Projects • More Class Time • Best Web Sites • Threaded Discussion • Chat in Class • Double Jeopardy Quiz

  10. Customization-Diversity • Cybershows (lectures, preview) • Personal Notes (email again) • Hierarchy of Help • Hyperlinks • Just In Time Teaching

  11. Consultants-Adjuncts • Alumni Editors • Globe Theatre • Session with Expert • Disciplinary Colleagues • Previous Students

  12. Please contribute YOUR ideas. • Go to our course site at http:// … • Type in your ideas. They can involve technology but other ideas are equally welcome. Wait to submit until I give the signal, then submit. ---Start with ways you increase communication & interaction with and among your students! ---Next write about some of the ways you promote & enable collaboration among students! ---Now write about some of the ways you use controversy & debate in your teaching! ---Finally, comment on ways you customize your teaching to individual students

  13. IBM Laptops for all Printers for all New Every 2 Years Own @ Graduation 31,000 Connections Standard Software 99% E-Mail Start 1995, 4 Year Phase In +15% Tuition for 37 Items +40 Faculty and 30 Staff THE WAKE FOREST PLANIBM A30, Pentium III, 1.13GHz Processor, 30GB Hardrive, 384 MB RAM15”ActMatrix Screen, CD-RW/DVD, Floppy, 56k modem, 16MB Video Ram, 10/100 Ethernet, USB&Serial&Parellel&Infrared Ports Standard Load Includes— MS Office, Dreamweaver, SPSS, Maple, Acrobat, Photoshop, Shockwave, Flash, Net Meeting, Real Producer & Player, Media Player, Windows XP Moviemaker, Apple QuickTime, Netscape & Explorer, Netscape Calendar & Communicator, Windows XP Professional

  14. Communication-Interaction

  15. Computers allow people---- • to belong to more communities • to be more actively engaged in each community • with more people • over more miles • for more months and years • TO BE MORE COLLABORATIVE Florida State FYS Reunion Band Dinner ICCEL -- Wake Forest University, 2003

  16. Consequences for Wake Forest • +SAT Scores & Class Ranks Level • +Retention & Grad Rates Up • +Satisfaction & Learning Up • +Faculty Recruitment Success Up http://www.wfu.edu/administration/ir/docs/accmea.pdf ICCEL -- Wake Forest University, 2003

  17. Impact of the Plan for the Class of 2000, No. of Items with Significant Differences in Wake Forest Student Responses, CSEQ Questionnaire 2002 Survey versus 1998 Survey Computer Usage………………..…2002 wins 6-2 Information Fluency………….…...2002 wins 5-1 Integration of Knowledge………..2002 wins 3-0 Specific Knowledge & Skills…….2002 wins 6-1 Interpersonal Communication…..2002 wins 8-0 Co-Curricular Participation……...2002 wins 5-0 Source: Ross Griffith, Wake Forest Univ. Institutional Research Office. http://www.wfu.edu/administration/ir/docs/CSEQComparison2002.pdf

  18. CSEQ Computer Usage Items • Searched Internet for course materials • Used word processor for paper • Used email to communicate with class • Made visual displays with computer • Developed web page, multimedia • Computer & Info Technology Scale • Discussion about computers & Technology • Joined in electronic class discussions Black= 2002 significantly greater than 1998. Italics Red= 1998 significantly greater than 2002

  19. Information Fluency Items • Retrieved off-campus library materials • Judged quality of information obtained • Learning on your own…finding info you need • Gaining range of info re career • Gaining knowledge re rest of the world • Used a dictionary or thesaurus Black= 2002 significantly greater than 1998. Italics Red= 1998 significantly greater than 2002

  20. Integration of Knowledge Items • Worked on project where you had to integrate ideas • Putting ideas together, seeing relationships • Developed role play, case study, simulation for class Black= 2002 significantly greater than 1998. Italics Red= 1998 significantly greater than 2002

  21. Specific Knowledge & Skills • Acquired job-related knowledge/skills • Seeing the importance of history • Write clearly and effectively • Developing own values & ethical standards • Acquired specialization for further education • Broadening acquaintance with & enjoyment of literature • Memorized formulas, definitions, technical terms Black= 2002 significantly greater than 1998. Italics Red= 1998 significantly greater than 2002

  22. Interpersonal Communication • Met with faculty to discuss group activities • Talked with instructor re info related to course • Discussed project ideas with a faculty member • Held conversation about the economy • Conversation about international relations • Conversation about current events in the news • Conversation about the arts • Presenting effectively when speaking with others Black= 2002 significantly greater than 1998. Italics Red= 1998 significantly greater than 2002

  23. Co-curricular Items • Went to a lecture or panel discussion • Attended meeting of campus club or student government • Worked on a campus committee • Managed a club or organization • Quality of Effort: Clubs & Organization Scale Black= 2002 significantly greater than 1998. Italics Red= 1998 significantly greater than 2002

  24. Impact of the Plan for the Class of 2000, No. of Items with Significant Differences in Wake Forest Student Responses, CSEQ Questionnaire 2002 Survey versus 1998 Survey Computer Usage………………..…2002 wins 6-2 Information Fluency………….…...2002 wins 5-1 Integration of Knowledge………..2002 wins 3-0 Specific Knowledge & Skills…….2002 wins 6-1 Interpersonal Communication…..2002 wins 8-0 Co-Curricular Participation……...2002 wins 5-0 Source: Wake Forest University Institutional Research Office. http://www.wfu.edu/administration/ir/docs/CSEQComparison2002.pdf

  25. Research Results • University of Central Florida--- Hybrid courses win! (the 80-20 rule) • 18,844 students at 71 American Universities--- More “good practices” for wired students! http://epaa.asu.edu/epaa/v9n49.html • 150 professors at 50 Research Universities--- Interaction, Collaboration, Debate, Custom, Adjuncts! • Virginia Polytechnic University--- Calculus failure rate cut by 44%!

  26. What about the future? • The Highest Benefit/Cost Uses • Education Trends Extended

  27. Low Hanging Fruit[within the constraints of time & money] • URLs • Email • Course Management System Better 85% Some Use Vs 5% Heavy Use

  28. How is the computer changing teaching & learning? • Community Magnified! More exchange between professors and students. • Engaged Learning Magnified! More interactive teaming and collaborative assignments. • Community Magnified! More contact with off campus intellects and constituencies. • Community Magnified! More active members of more co-curricular organizations.

  29. The 21st Century Context • Personal. Customized. Interactive. • Gold Standard = Hybrid (80-20 & 20-80) • On Line Only for New Buyers & Over-Served • Student-Centered Curriculum • “Houses” instead of Disciplines • Loose-leaf Collections of Course Components, instead of Textbooks • Collaborative Teaching • Teams of Professionals to Support Learning • Engaged Learning

  30. Comments and Questions Let’s Talk!

  31. David G. BrownWake Forest UniversityWinston-Salem, NC 27109, 336-758-4878email: brown@wfu.eduhttp//:www.wfu.edu/~brownfax: 336-758-5012 Wake Forest University, 2003

More Related