Download
12 years ago n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
12 Years Ago, PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
12 Years Ago,

12 Years Ago,

124 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

12 Years Ago,

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. 12 Years Ago, JWST (NGST) Deep Field Simulation (2’ x 2’) Im & Stockman (1998)

  2. High Redshift Universe

  3. The Quest for First Something Myungshin Im (CEOU, Astronomy Program, Dept. of Physics & Astronomy, Seoul National University)

  4. The very beginning of Astronomical Objects • First stars, galaxies, quasars, black holes, …. ?

  5. ----------------- Z > 6 --------------- Z = 2 - 3 ------------- Z = 0 Critical for our understandingof galaxy formation/evolution

  6. GMT Advantages • High angular resolution • Moderate to high spectral resolution spectroscopy (R > 1000) • Quick response possible

  7. Supermassive Black Holes (SMBH) • What are they? - Black Holes with masses ~ 105 – 1010 M⊙ • Where are they ? • - Centers of massive spheroids/bulges or quasars Elliptical galaxy Bulges of Spirals Quasars/AGNs

  8. First SMBHs in Early Universe • Quasars are powered by matters accreted to SMBHs. • Quasars have been discovered out to z ~ 6.43 (Fan et al; Willott et al. 2007). Luminous quasars exist out to z ~ 6.4. QSO at z=6.43 (Willott et al. 2007)

  9. Growth of SMBHs ? Volonteri & Rees (2006) • M(t)=M(0) exp[(1-ε)/ε (t/tEdd)]=M(0) exp(t/τ), with τ ~ 4.5 x 107 (ε/0.1) yrs • Not enough time (only ~0.64 Gyr between z= 6 and 15), Seed mass? • MBH with UV-lines uncertain (CIV: 0.1549 μm, MgII: 0.2798 μm) • MBH from Balmer lines (most reliable)  Growth History of SMBHs ε=0.1 Super-critical Sijacki, Springel, & Haehnelt (2009) ε=0.2 ε=0.4

  10. AKARI Spectroscopyof Quasars at z > 4.5 2.5-5.0 μm spectroscopy from space (R ~ 130)

  11. BR 0006-6224 (z=4.51) NP NG

  12. QSONG : Hα lines of 14 QSOs at 4.5 < z < 6.22 z = 4.69 z = 5.59 z = 4.97 z = 5.80 Im et al. 2010, in prep

  13. SDSS J 114816+525150 at z=6.42

  14. ? Massive Black Holes out to z ~ 6 More points here (H. Jun) • Black Hole Mass ~ 109.3 – 1010.1 M⊙ • No M > 1010 M⊙ SMBHs at z ~ 6 + L/LE ~ 1 (vs ~ 0.1 at lower redshift)  Formation of the most massive BHs • Quasar Cliff? SDSS AKARI Im et al. (2010) Shen et al. (2007)

  15. Infrared Medium-Deep Survey (IMS) • J-band Imaging over 200 deg2 to ~23 AB mag (+I,z,Y,…) to identify and study z > 6.5 quasars • Observation started at late May, 2009 using UKIRT (9 nights) • Currently, ~30 deg2 covered

  16. Quasars at z ~ 7?

  17. James Webb Space Telescope GMT Project Handbook Giant Magellan Telescope Quasars at z > 6.5? Prominent Targets for New Generation Facilities (~2014 and beyond)

  18. GMT and High-z Quasars • Probe of the reionization epoch (Talks by X. Fan, S. Wyithe) • Growth of the first SMBHs With moderate resolution spectroscopy, - Mass tracers CIV (z < 13), MgII (z < 6.8) - Narrow velocity widths (~1000 km/sec) - Resolving outflow signatures

  19. First Clusters • Emerging late in hierarchical galaxy formation (strong function of redshift, and cosmology, such as the power-law spectrum, non-Guassianity) • Comparing theory vesus observation (how do we determine halo mass?) • How do we identify them? (Reed et al. 2008)

  20. Proto-Clusters at High Redshift • Kang & Im (2009) – Analysis of Spitzer GOODS + VLT data • Proto-cluster at z=3.7 (tuniv = 1.7 billion years) • Mass – 1014 M⊙ • Also, at z ~ 0.7, 1.8, 2.55, and 4.0 (all associated with AGNs or submm galaxies)  Member galaxies are too faint for spectroscopy: Larger telescopes are needed. Number density contour showing an overdensity of galaxies at A area.

  21. 3” Frist Galaxies • Some claim detection of galaxies out to z ~ 10 •  very small (0.1-0.2”, also in Im & Stockman 1998) Galaxies at z ~ 6 (12.5 Gyrs ago). Bouwens et al. (2007)

  22. dT=0.5 days dT=5.5 days dT=8.5 days First Star (Explosion) GRB? • The most energetic phonomenon in the Universe – Eiso ~ 1054 erg/sec • Possible origins: Hypernovae explosion or merging of neutron stars • GRB afterglow lasts a few days – weeks First GRB afterglow (GRB071010B at z=0.947) observed by Korean Facility (Urata, Im, Lee, et al. 2009)

  23. GRB090423 at z ~ 8.2(Tanvir et al; Salvaterra et al. 2009) 30-1.5hrs after the burst • Y-band calibration data from LOAO (Im et al. 2009)

  24. GRB 100205A • Dark Burst with K ~ 21.9 AB mag, H ~ 23.54 AB mag, 2.6 hrs after the burst (no optical detection) • GRB at 11 < z < 13.5, or dusty GRB at a lower redshift • BOAO JK observation (with H.-I. Sung), LOAO zY observation (Im et al. GCN Circulars 10398)  confirm afterglow nature KASINICS K-band

  25. GRB 100905A • UKIRT zJHK imaging from 15 min after the burst (Im et al. 2010, GCN Circular 11222)

  26. GRB 100905A at 6. 7 < z < 8.5 Easy imaging/spectroscopy target for GMT

  27. H Neutral Fraction and HII Bubble Size McQuinn et al. Decadal Survey White paper (2010)

  28. Metals in ISM/IGM z=6.3 Kawai et al. (2006), Totani et al. (2006) 4hr integration with Subaru McQuinn et al. Decadal Survey White paper (2010) GRB 080613-like GRB with R=3000

  29. GMT and First something • First QSOs: re-ionization state, BH growth history, host galaxy • First proto-clusters: halo mass, galaxy properties in overdensity (z > 2) • First GRBs: re-ionization state of the early universe