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Instructional Variety (the BIG 6) Wrap-up

Instructional Variety (the BIG 6) Wrap-up

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Instructional Variety (the BIG 6) Wrap-up

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  1. Card Q: What do you worry about most as you begin to work with students? Instructional Variety (the BIG 6) Wrap-up • Agenda • Review of take-home final • Review of Final Exam In-class activities • Instructional Variety Wrap-up Activity • Course evaluations • Mastery 4 Exam • Course grade activity

  2. Announcements • Final exam due on Livetext by Dec 5 • Go to ITC, 3rd Floor Withers if you do not know how to post it • You will find your graded score on Livetext by Dec 9th • Final exam time—here, expect about an hour: • Wed Dec 5, 11:30 a.m. • In-class disposition checklist—you can’t study for it • In-class mastery make-up from this week’s mastery so bring text to final

  3. Final Exam • Due by Dec 5, 11:00 on Livetext—bring a hard copy to class • Everyone uses the same video • You watch the video 4 times as you answer each of 4 parts of the final: • Classroom Climate • Classroom Management • Student Engagement • Instructional Variety • You use a different checklist instrument for each part—some require several instruments • You answer the prompts for each part • Bring hardcopy packet to class on the 5th • I will grade by Monday Dec. 10th—you will find rubric and comments on Livetext; will have hard copies in my office for you to pick up after the 10th

  4. Final Exam Meeting Date • Wed Dec 5, 11:30 a.m.; should take about an hour • In-class disposition checklist—you can’t study for it, but will work on it in class • Bring Text along—For Mastery make-up if needed, will do right in class • Informal course survey

  5. Grades and Office Visits • Calculation sheet • Office times • Questions about College of Ed • Questions about EDUC 200 • Questions about grades—but must bring in completed sheet

  6. Remember the “Big 6” Ways to build in instructional variability: • Using a variety of attention-gaining devices • Showing enthusiasm and animation • Varying instructional activities and media • Mixing rewards and reinforcements • Varying types of questions and probes • Using student ideas

  7. Today: Instrument 8.1, p. 237 • Family 1 – observe for 1. Attention-getting; Family 2 = Enthusiasm; etc • Record both frequencies (number of times you saw the behavior) and brief descriptions of the behaviors. • Example: Reward and reinforcers: • 5 verbal reinforcers (praise) • 1 reward of free time activity • 17 smiles as rewards

  8. Course Evaluations • When completed, review for Mastery 4 • Try to complete in 10 minutes

  9. Grading • Calculate your own grades using the grading sheet • Sign up for an office visit to ask about: • College of Ed questions • EDUC 200 questions • Grades—but bring completed grade sheet • Any other course issues

  10. Mastery 4 • I will hand back graded at final exam • Bring text to class to do corrections during final exam time if needed

  11. Types of Questions 1 • Convergent – have single or limited number of right answers that are commonly associated with the goals of Direct Instruction (Direct instruction occurs when the teacher is the major provider of information.) (Think of some examples.) • Look for patterns—if a student gets wrong, how might a teacher respond?

  12. Types of Questions 2 • Divergent – may have many right answers and are most commonly associated with the goals of Indirect Instruction (Indirect instruction helps students use their own knowledge and experiences to actively construct learning.) (Think of some examples.) • Look for patterns—if a student gets wrong, how might a teacher respond?

  13. Bloom’s Taxonomy See chart on page 126. • Definition: a chart that lists degree of thinking difficulty for student work ranging from knowledge (memory) to the highest order thinking (evaluation) • What levels result in higher student learning?

  14. Probes • Questions that follow questions and are carefully crafted to deepen, enrich, and extend an earlier response • Can be used to elicit a clarifying response to an earlier question, solicit new information related to an earlier question, or redirect the learner into a more productive area • Examples?

  15. Wait Time: How Long? • Refers to the amount of time a teacher gives a learner to respond • Allows all learners time to think about, extend, or modify their responses • Good wait time results in: • Length of student responses increase 300-700% • More student inferences supported by logical argument • Number of questions asked by students increased • Student to student exchanges increased • Misbehavior decreased • More students volunteered to respond

  16. 6. Using Student Ideas • Acknowledging (repeating the logical connectives) • Modifying (rephrasing or conceptualizing) • Applying (using the idea to teach an inference or predict the next step ) • Comparing (drawing a relationship between the idea and ideas expressed earlier) • Summarizing (use what was said by student(s) as a summarization of concepts)