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Professional Development Literacy Initiatives for Students with Severe Disabilities

Professional Development Literacy Initiatives for Students with Severe Disabilities. Paula Marshall FDLRS Miccosukee FASD Fall Leadership Conference September 21, 2010. Session 8. No Child Left Behind Act of 2001…. 2014 every child is supposed to test on grade level in reading and math.

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Professional Development Literacy Initiatives for Students with Severe Disabilities

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  1. Professional Development Literacy Initiatives for Students with Severe Disabilities Paula Marshall FDLRS Miccosukee FASD Fall Leadership Conference September 21, 2010 Session 8

  2. No Child Left Behind Act of 2001… • 2014 every child is supposed to test on grade level in reading and math. • What about our children with significant disabilities?

  3. Past (and still present) Situations • University training had been focused on functional skills • First Sunshine State Standards minimally addressed literacy • Lack of research • Minimal expectations for these learners • Advocacy?

  4. Augmentative Communication and Assistive Educational Technology…to the rescue!! • FDLRS Technology Services (ATEN) • Linda Burkhart • Kelly Fonner • Others • Pati King-DeBaun • Carolyn Musslewhite

  5. A Bit of… History… Karen Erickson, Ph.D. Center for Literacy and Disability Studies, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

  6. CARD Summer Institutes Dr. Karen Erickson Center for Literacy Studies UNC-Chapel Hill Literacy in ACC FDLRS Technology Coordinating Units (ATEN) • Wikispace • Vodcasts • Website links • Connect Pasco County Summer 2010 SPRINGS Miccosukee PAEC WESTGATE

  7. 2nd Annual Florida Literacy Camp, December 2007

  8. Collaboration is Key!

  9. We Look at the Research… by Karen Erickson and David Koppenhaver by Patricia Cunningham, Dorothy Hall and Cheryl Sigmon by June E. Downing

  10. Four Blocks Framework • Developed in 1989-91 by Patricia Cunningham, Dorothy Hall & Margaret Defee • First Implemented in 1st-3rd grade classes in North Carolina • Recently expanded to include models for: • Kindergarten classes – “Building Blocks” • 4th – 6th grade classes – “Big Blocks”

  11. Four Blocks Framework • Balanced Literacy Approach • 90 minute reading block • Working with Words…letters, sounds, sight words, word families (Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, handwriting) • Self-Selected Reading… Shared Reading • Shared Reading…Guided Reading • Writing

  12. Children With Disabilities: Reading & Writing the Four Blocks WayDeveloped by Karen Erickson & David Koppenhaver Implemented at the Center for Literacy & Disability Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Students with Communication Disorders Students with Moderate – Severe Cognitive Impairments Students with Learning Disabilities

  13. Adapting the Four Block Model for Students with Disabilities Disability type or label does not provide instructional information Consider the areas of significant difference: Communication Cognition Physical abilities Senses (vision/hearing) Affect Attention

  14. Adapting the Four Block Model for Students with Disabilities Adapt only in the areas of need. Try to develop adaptations that do not significantly change the objective of the activity. Multi-level materials are available in each block. Use assistive technology as a tool to support students in Four Block activities.

  15. Beliefs… • Literacy is for everyone and has many different forms • Federal mandates support literacy for everyone • Several barriers can be overcome concerning literacy instruction for students with severe disabilities • Literacy skills enhance ones quality of life in many ways. • Literacy instruction is as important for students with significant disabilities as it is for everyone else

  16. Time to test the waters…

  17. 7 Critical qualities of professional development (Fogarty & Pete, 2007) • Sustained and implemented over time • Job embedded • Collegial learning communities • Interactive and engaging • Integrated (web, F2F, text, video) • Results oriented, data and goal driven • Practical, hands on

  18. Time to practice skills • Time to share ideas: group brainstorming • Ending sessions with products;

  19. Adult Learners want… • Models and samples, stories and case studies • Time to practice skills • Time to share ideas: group brainstorming • Self reflection time • End Sessions with a product • Time to ask questions • Answers to questions • Real life contexts • Choice of activities: differentiation • Choice of supports: live demo, video, quickguide, hands-on • Resources such as articles, websites • Reed, Kaplan & Bowser, 2009

  20. Choice of Activities… differentiation

  21. Self reflection time

  22. Welcome to the Center for Literacy and Disability Studies — Department of Allied Health Sciences - UNC School of Medicine Models and samples, stories and case studies Real life contexts

  23. Real Life Contexts • Add class expamples

  24. Case Studies

  25. Resources such as articles, websites

  26. Learning from Karen(face-to-face) • CARD Conferences in Gainesville and other spots in state • Fall 05. Jan 06. March 07 Everhart Tallahassee project • April 08 Margaret K. Lewis Panama City • Sept 08 December 08 Pensacola

  27. Present Situation…Paradigm shifts in teacher training • Sage on stage has shifted to collaborative active learning • Platforms include • F2F • Distance • On-demand training • Professional Learning Communities • Coaching/mentoring

  28. Connecting With Karen

  29. National Staff Development Council • The council recommends that states, school districts, and individual schools devote at least 30% of their technology budgets to teacher development and initiating teacher learning simultaneously with purchase of the technology. • Quality staff development extends beyond once-a-year training events to include generous amounts of at-the-elbow classroom coaching as a regular feature of teachers’ work lives. It also includes frequent opportunities for teachers to share their technology-based practices with colleagues. • NSDC recommends “25% of PD time be devoted to learning and collaborating with colleagues” (NSDC, 200t)

  30. Benefits of Technology in Education • Harold Wenglinsky (1998) analyzed data from the 1996 National Assessment for Education Progress • The study found that students of teachers who had received any kind of staff development in computer technology during the past five years outperformed students whose teachers had no training. • Schools in which teachers had professional development and used computers to teach-higher order skills also enjoyed lower student absenteeism and higher teacher morals. Dennis Sparks (Feb 1999) Plugging educators into technology www.NSDC.org, retrieved on October21 2008.

  31. Whole to Part Model

  32. The NEW PD • Paradigm shift in staff development • Collaborative learning communities • Cloud Technology/Web 2.0 • Contemporary training tools

  33. We are on our own!

  34. Present Situation • Access points correlate with Gen. Ed SSS. • Literacy is addressed • Grass roots model of professional development spreading • Need a systemic and systematic delivery model of professional development

  35. Plugging Educators into Technology (Sparks 2006) • “Technology’s contribution to student learning depends on school leaders wise investment in teachers’ knowledge and technology and skills. Without that investment you might as well leave the hardware in its box.”

  36. Tech Integration • “…effective integration of technology has more to do with teaching pedagogy, and has little to do with technology itself. The author further contends that in too many schools we the see the use of “technology “ with an absence of relationship to instructional objectives and learning outcomes.” Creighton, T (2003) Principal Technology Leader. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

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