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Literacy Instruction for Students with Significant Disabilities

Literacy Instruction for Students with Significant Disabilities

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Literacy Instruction for Students with Significant Disabilities

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  1. Literacy Instruction for Students with Significant Disabilities AEA 9 Cohort II Iowa Core Framework for Effective Instruction

  2. Iowa Core Literacy Instruction Aligned to the Iowa Alternate Assessment • Learning Goal • Understand how Students with Significant Disabilities can Access, Participate, and demonstrate performance of the Iowa Core Literacy Standards • Success Criteria- “I Can”… • Align my Iowa Core Literacy instruction to the Iowa Alternate Assessment • Instruct an adapted grade level shared/guided reading lesson that is differentiated to the learning requirements of my students

  3. Literacy Instruction for Students with Significant Disabilities-Day 1 • Learning Goal: Understand… • The Interrelatedness between Communication and Literacy • Align my literacy instruction to the Iowa Core & Iowa Alternate Assessment • Success Criteria: “I Can”… • Apply the Framework for Effective Instruction and Use Instructional Resources to support my Literacy Instruction • Integrate Shared/Guided Reading Lesson into Framework

  4. Checking-In…

  5. Iowa Core One Curriculum for “All” Students

  6. Framework for Effective InstructionMerging Content : Instruction : Assessment

  7. Content

  8. Instruction

  9. Assessment

  10. Reflection of Practice • How is Literacy Instruction going in your Classroom? • Share out • Is it aligned to the Iowa Core & IAA • Is the lesson delivered through researched evidence-based strategies? • Shared Reading/Guided Reading

  11. Purpose for Literacy InstructionStudents with Significant Disabilities • Literacy is a key foundational skill for all learners • Opportunities for vocational and independent living –information for everyday life • Entertainment and Leisure Activities • Increase control over technology for Communication • Self Development and self-concept • If not-we separate, segregate, and isolate Adapted from Bringing Literacy to Life, TSHA Convention 2/22/2008

  12. What We Know about Literacy and Students with Significant Disabilities • “The process of learning to read and write is a continuum that begins at birth-there are no prerequisites • Children learn written language through active engagement with their world • Emergent literacy behaviors are fleeting and variable depending on the text, task, and environment.” Karen Erickson, 2011

  13. The Link Between Literacy Language and Communication

  14. Literacy is a Language Based Skill • Ultimate goal=to understand the text • Listening and reading comprehension strongly correlated (Nation,2005) • Reading comprehension taps all aspects of language: phonology, syntax, semantics, morphology, and pragmatics (Schuele, 2004) (Erickson, 2009)

  15. “Language is the Key” to Literacy Learning • “Word knowledge” helps develop “world knowledge” and vice versa • Word and world knowledge help students understand what they hear and read • Successful readers in first grade have a 20,000 receptive vocabulary-poor readers have less than 5,000 words TSHA 2011

  16. Traditional View of Literacy Learning • Learning to read and write can only happen after a firm foundation in oral language has been built • Readiness concepts must be taught • Knowledge of the alphabet is necessary • Writing follows reading K. Fonner & S. Marfilus 2010

  17. Views of Literacy Learning

  18. Iowa Core Connections • 4 Strands • Reading • Literature • Information • Foundational Skills • Writing • Listening • Speaking

  19. Iowa Core Requires Emphasis On… • Learning that builds overtime • Application of knowledge and skills • Active participation and interaction in learning activities • Collaboration and communication • Ongoing comprehensive instruction in Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, & Language

  20. Oral and Written Language Development in the Iowa Core

  21. Instructional Components Step 1: Know Your Student

  22. Step 1: Know Your Student • Know your student through their Learning Brain Networks and apply this knowledge when designing instruction

  23. Connection with Our Text • Individual Differences that Impact Literacy Learning • Communication • Cognition • Physical abilities • Senses Pg. 7

  24. Connection with Our Text • Children may have significant differences in one or more of these area that require adaptations of the materials, instruction, or environment Pg. 8

  25. Literacy Levels • Emergent Literacy • Transitional Literacy • Conventional Literacy Musslewhite, Caroline and Erickson, Karen and Ziolkowski, Ruth. "The Beginning Literacy Framework." (2002) Web.12 Jul 2009. <http://www.paec.org/fdlrstech/files/pdfs/readingPdfs/begliteracyframework.pdf>.

  26. Emergent Literacy Level • Characteristics • Students are in the very beginning stage of literacy. • There are NO prerequisites. • There is no such thing as ‘Not Ready For'! Musslewhite, Caroline and Erickson, Karen and Ziolkowski, Ruth. "The Beginning Literacy Framework." (2002) Web.12 Jul 2009. <http://www.paec.org/fdlrstech/files/pdfs/readingPdfs/begliteracyframework.pdf>.

  27. Emergent Literacy Level • Characteristics • Little attention during book reading or elsewhere • No comprehension of graphics • Apparent disinterest in computers • Struggling or inconsistent access to the computer Musslewhite, Caroline and Erickson, Karen and Ziolkowski, Ruth. "The Beginning Literacy Framework." (2002) Web.12 Jul 2009. <http://www.paec.org/fdlrstech/files/pdfs/readingPdfs/begliteracyframework.pdf>.

  28. Emergent Literacy Level • Instructional Insights • Allow for lots of repetition with the same materials • Give exposure to lots of different types of materials • Watch for student responses and start to identify student preferences Musslewhite, Caroline and Erickson, Karen and Ziolkowski, Ruth. "The Beginning Literacy Framework." (2002) Web.12 Jul 2009. <http://www.paec.org/fdlrstech/files/pdfs/readingPdfs/begliteracyframework.pdf>.

  29. Emergent Literacy Level • Instructional Insights • Get students interacting with the book. Ask about graphics, allow students to • participate in reading especially with repeated lines, make predictions about words • Relate everything possible to the student's own life and experience

  30. Transitional Emerging Literacy • Characteristics • Transitional readers can read and understand familiar text (e.g., stories for which they have had multiple exposures) • They have few if any strategies for reading words on their own and are inconsistent in reading even familiar words across a variety of contexts Musslewhite, Caroline and Erickson, Karen and Ziolkowski, Ruth. "The Beginning Literacy Framework." (2002) Web.12 Jul 2009. <http://www.paec.org/fdlrstech/files/pdfs/readingPdfs/begliteracyframework.pdf>.

  31. Transitional Emerging Literacy Characteristics • Shows interest and engagement in text • Attends to graphics • Interacts with the person reading the story • identify a handful of letters or words (even if • inconsistent) • Utilize rhyme, rhythm and/or repetition • Fill in repeated lines (repetition) • Predict a rhyming word (rhyme) • Rocks or claps in sync with a story (rhythm) Musslewhite, Caroline and Erickson, Karen and Ziolkowski, Ruth. "The Beginning Literacy Framework." (2002) Web.12 Jul 2009. <http://www.paec.org/fdlrstech/files/pdfs/readingPdfs/begliteracyframework.pdf>.

  32. Transitional Literacy Level • Instructional Insights • Start to expect students to independently read some of the words in connected text. • Encourage the use of cues including initial letter, repetition or rhythm of text and pictures. • Increase opportunities for repetition by selecting preferred books and other text types. • During this level, it is important to read the same text multiple times. Musslewhite, Caroline and Erickson, Karen and Ziolkowski, Ruth. "The Beginning Literacy Framework." (2002) Web.12 Jul 2009. <http://www.paec.org/fdlrstech/files/pdfs/readingPdfs/begliteracyframework.pdf>.

  33. Conventional Literacy • Characteristics • Conventional readers can independently decode and understand unfamiliar text at their level. • Uses simple decoding strategies Musslewhite, Caroline and Erickson, Karen and Ziolkowski, Ruth. "The Beginning Literacy Framework." (2002) Web.12 Jul 2009. <http://www.paec.org/fdlrstech/files/pdfs/readingPdfs/begliteracyframework.pdf>.

  34. Conventional Literacy Level • Instructional Insights • Make sure the emphasis is not completely on word identification and phonics at this level. • Provide daily, meaningful purposes for reading and reading text at the right level. • Provide access to more than 6 different books and other texts at the appropriate level EVERY day. Musslewhite, Caroline and Erickson, Karen and Ziolkowski, Ruth. "The Beginning Literacy Framework." (2002) Web.12 Jul 2009. <http://www.paec.org/fdlrstech/files/pdfs/readingPdfs/begliteracyframework.pdf>.

  35. Levels of LiteracyBeginning Literacy Framework Don Johnston

  36. Step 1: Know Your StudentStudentLearner Profile-Literacy-Example

  37. Step 1: Know Your StudentStudentLearner Profile-Literacy

  38. Video Activity: Directions • Consider important concepts in Knowing Your Student (Step 1) • Watch the video and make notes on the blank Step 1 form related to Knowing Your Student • Insert Video Here

  39. Step 1: Know Your Student: Access to Literacy Task(s) • Describe the skills in relationship to the literacy task(s) • Position to Facilitate • Sensory input • Hearing • Vision • Motor Output • Mobility-head/body turning, gesturing • Manipulation-hand skills • Communication-facial expressions, eye blinking, vocalization & speaking • Endurance for motor performance Amy Garrett, MA Ed. Assistive Technology, AEA 11, 2011

  40. Team Work Complete Literacy Student Learner Profile on Select Student Share Out

  41. Step 2: Know the Content

  42. Instructional Components Step 2: Know the Content

  43. Collaboration with General Education

  44. Iowa Core Literacy Standardshttp://www.corecurriculum.iowa.gov/Standards.aspx?C=Literacy

  45. Instructional DesignDesigning a Purposeful Comprehension Lesson

  46. Instructional DesignDesigning a Purposeful Comprehension Lesson

  47. Genres of Grade-Appropriate Text