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Writing A successful foundation grant PowerPoint Presentation
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Writing A successful foundation grant

Writing A successful foundation grant

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Writing A successful foundation grant

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  1. Writing A successful foundation grant OCTOBER 2009

  2. Understanding the Relationship Federal Agency $ $ $ The main interactions are funding and reporting.

  3. Understanding the Relationship Foundation Applicants: have the ideas and the capacity to solve problems, but not the dollars Foundations: have the financial resources but not the other resources needed to create programs.

  4. Building the Relationship • Roadmap • Vision Statement Understand the Mission of the Foundation • Previous Award Recipients • Board of Trustees

  5. Building the Relationship • Attend Workshop Make Contact with the Foundation • Talk with Previous Recipients • Letter of Inquiry • Contact Program Manager

  6. Gifts versus Grants Gift: a voluntary and irrevocable transfer of money, services or property from an external donor where no commitment of resources or services other than, possibly, the committing to use the gift as the donor specifies Overseen by the Office of Development Grant: an externally funded activity where there is an agreement representing the transfer of money or property from a sponsor in exchange for specific services. The agreement is enforceable by law, and performance is usually accomplished in a specific time frame, with support being revocable for cause. Overseen by the Office of the Vice President for Research

  7. Assessing the Fit Does the project fit with the philosophy and mission of the Foundation? Does the proposal address a critical need?

  8. Making your Case – components of a winning proposal • Project Summary • Project Description • Budget • Supplemental Documents

  9. Project Summary • Write this last!!!! • Some consider this the most important section. • Make the argument! • Be certain to include: • Problem/Need • Solution • Objectives and major activities • Outcomes • Expertise • Funding requirements

  10. Project Description • Statement of Need • Implementation Plan • Outcomes • Evaluation • Sustainability

  11. Statement of Need • Why is this project necessary, timely? • How does it fit within the mission/vision of the Foundation? • How does it fit into the body of knowledge within your field? • TIPS:  • Present statistics that are relevant to your target population, accurate, and up-to-date. • Avoid overstatements or emotional appeals • State why the problem you address is worse than others or the solution you propose makes more sense than others – But don’t be overly critical of others. • Describe how your work complements, but does not duplicate, the work of others.

  12. Implementation Plan • Objectives, Activities, Timelines, Metrics • Management Plan • Roles and responsibilities • Prior experience/expertise • Communication – internal and external • TIPS: • Goals versus Objectives • Objectives are the measurable outcomes of the program. They define your activities. • Objectives must be tangible, specific, concrete, measurable, and achievable in a specified time period. • Be realistic in setting objectives. Don't promise what you can't deliver.

  13. Goals and Objectives • Goal: Our after-school program will help children read better. • Example Objectives: • Behavioral - A human action is anticipated. • Fifty of the 70 children participating will learn to swim. • Performance - A specific time frame within which a behavior will occur, at an expected proficiency level, is expected. • Fifty of the 70 children will learn to swim within six months and will pass a basic swimming proficiency test administered by a Red Cross-certified lifeguard. • Process - The manner in which something occurs is an end in itself. • We will document the teaching methods utilized, identifying those with the greatest success. • Product - A tangible item results. • A manual will be created to be used in teaching swimming to this age and proficiency group in the future. • Source: Foundation center: Proposal Writing Short Course

  14. Timelines • Gantt Chart

  15. Outcomes • Broader Impacts • Educational components • Benefits to society • Diversity • Portability • Scalability

  16. Evaluation • Things to consider: • Formative vs. Summative • Qualitative vs. Quantitative • Internal vs. External Review • Metrics vs. Milestones

  17. Sustainability • Demonstrate long-term financial viability of the project. • Finite project • Capacity building –will contribute to its own self-sustainability • Attractive to other investors

  18. Budget • Objectives and activities dictate staffing and administrative requirements. Make sure all budget items are directly linked with an objective. • Budget Breakdown • Personnel • Travel • Supplies • Equipment • Other • Budget Justification

  19. Indirect Costs • Ohio University has federally and state-negotiated indirect cost rate (IDC) agreements. • e.g., 47.5% Research; 48% Instructional; 39% Public Service • Some sponsors/programs limit the IDC • IDC are assessed on direct costs less: • Equipment • Scholarship • Participant costs • Subcontracts over $25K • Patient care costs

  20. Indirect Costs • Example: • Supplies: $10,000 • Travel: $5,000 • Printing: $1,000 • Equipment: $15,000 • Total Direct Costs: $31,000 • Modified Total Direct: $31,000-$15,000 = $16,000 • Indirect Costs (47.5%): $7,600 • Total Project: $38,600 • Some sponsors dictate total project costs, others specify total direct costs and allow IDC on top of that.

  21. Supplemental Documents • Biographical Information • Letters of Support (financial not moral) • Letters of Access • Survey Instruments • Other

  22. Logic Model • Source: W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Logic Model Development Guide