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How to Format Your Thoughts Academically

How to Format Your Thoughts Academically. Created by Deanna from the Student Success Centre. Brief Overview of Concepts. General APA Specifics Title Page Abstract General Academic Writing Referencing the Ideas of Others Essential Citations Student Success Centre Services.

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How to Format Your Thoughts Academically

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  1. How to Format Your Thoughts Academically Created by Deanna from the Student Success Centre

  2. Brief Overview of Concepts • General APA Specifics • Title Page • Abstract • General Academic Writing • Referencing the Ideas of Others • Essential Citations • Student Success Centre Services

  3. General APA Specifics • use white, 8 ½ by 11 inch paper • double space EVERYTHING • set up 1-inch margins • align text to the left margin • indent all paragraphs • use a standard typeface (i.e. – Times Roman) • think of each section as separate pieces • Title page • Abstract • Introduction – Body – Conclusion • References

  4. Running head: WRITING AS FREEDOM AND IMPRISONMENT 1 * shortened title, less than than 50 characters (counting spaces) * numbering starts here Writing Unites the Freedom to be Creative within the Imprisonment of Guidelines Deanna Selin University of Regina * title, name, and affiliation

  5. WRITING AS FREEDOM AND IMPRISONMENT 2 * running head & page number * section title Abstract This paper examined the relationship between the freedom of creativity and the imprisonment of guidelines during the writing process. Participants were 25 graduate-level students from the University of Regina. It was hypothesized that these students would show more creativity in their writing skills as guidelines increased. The methodology included using learning journals to discuss thoughts on how each student viewed his/her personal writing style. The hypothesis was shown to be true and will be discussed at length in the paper. Keywords: writing, freedom, creativity * word limit: 150 - 250

  6. General Academic Writing • Introduction • identify the topic (without assumptions) • explore and resolve and an interesting problem • THESIS STATEMENT = problem, contradiction, argument • Body Paragraphs • engage in dialogue and ‘talk through it’ • use transition words and phrases to create flow • your own words are more powerful than others • Conclusion • closed ending: restates main ideas to remind the reader • open ending: shows new thought to leave the reader thinking and may end with another question

  7. Referencing the Ideas of Others • paraphrase/summarize to condense material According to Smith (2003) writing can be fun and creative. • direct quotation “Writing can also be challenging” (Newman, 2002, p. 7). Newman (2002) suggests writing can be “challenging” (p. 7). • direction quotation of length (50 words or more) Bob’s (2005) research found the following: Writing can be challenging and rewarding. It is a challenge to learn guidelines, but rewarding to write about something of interest to the individual student. Students have unique perspectives that require creativity. (p. 54)

  8. WRITING AS FREEDOM AND IMPRISONMENT 25 * running head & page number * section title References Author’s last name, first and middle initial. (Year). Title of publication. City of Publication: Who Published It. Azul, M. P. (2005). How to write effectively: In university. Toronto: Hook Publishing. Bourne College. (2012). Freedom in captivity affecting students. Retrieved from http://howtobefree.ca Contributors' names (Last edited date). Title of resource. Retrieved from http://Web address * reference EVERY contributor you used

  9. WRITING AS FREEDOM AND IMPRISONMENT 25 * how many authors? References Astin, A. W. (1999). Student involvement: A theory for higher education Journal of College Student Development 40(5), 518-529. Retrieved from www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/recordDetail?accno=EJ614278 Naghavi, M., Falk, E., Hect, H.S., Jamieson, M. J., Kaul, S., Berman, D., … SHAPE Task Force. (2006). From vulnerable plaque to vulnerable patient – part III: Executive summary of the screening for heart attack prevention and education (SHAPE) task force report. The American Journal of Cardiology 98(2A), 2H-15H. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2006.03.002 Van Driel, J. H., Beijaard, D., & Verloop, N. (2001). Professional development and reform in science education: The role of teacher’s practical knowledge. doi: 10.1002/1098- 2736(200102) * no DOI? use website - one ? - more than 7? * What is a DOI? Digital object identifier – must include in reference. It ensures good content and always begins with the number ‘10’. - 7 or less ?

  10. Student Success Centre Services • information on website • academic writing workshops • writing tutor sessions

  11. Student Success Centre Riddell Centre 230 E-mail: student.success@uregina.ca Website: http://www.uregina.ca Learning Lounge in RC 251.21 used for SSC workshops

  12. References American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association. Washington: American Psychological Association. The Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL). (2012). Welcome to the OWL. Retrieved from http://owl.english.purdue.edu/ Student Success Centre. (2012). Writing support. Retrieved from http://www.uregina.ca/student/ssc/writing-support/index.html

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