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Families/Wh ā nau -Year 1 data - PowerPoint Presentation
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Families/Wh ā nau -Year 1 data -

Families/Wh ā nau -Year 1 data -

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  1. Families/Whānau -Year 1 data - • Roy McKenzie Centre for the Study of Families • June, 2007

  2. Who are the families involved in our survey? • Family structuren • Intact 1150 • Lone 454 • Step/complex 205 • Extended 72 • Other 8 • Total 1889

  3. Family dimensions • Cohesion • Identity • Mutual activities • Autonomy • Monitoring and supervision • Conflict

  4. Family dimensions • Cohesion “My family ask each other for help” • Identity “We are proud to be members of our family” • Mutual activities “Do you and your family have meals together?” • Autonomy “Someone in my family encourages me to make my own decisions” • Monitoring and Supervision “Someone in my family makes sure I don’t stay up too late” • Conflict “There is a lot of yelling at each other in my family”

  5. Family dimensions: looking at age and gender Family dimensionsDifferences Age Gender • Cohesion √ • Identity √ • Mutual activities • Conflict √ √ - Monitoring and Supervision √ √ - Autonomy √ √

  6. Family dimensions: looking at age and gender • Cohesion Overall, older participants show lower • Identity ratings of these family dimensions • Mutual activities - Monitoring and Supervision Females showed higher level of - Autonomy monitoring and supervision and autonomy

  7. Family conflict: age and gender interaction

  8. Family strengths and “weak spots”10-11 years old StrengthsWeak spots - Being nice - Dad getting angry - Biking together - Not planning the day - Cheering each other - Being smacked - Having lots of pets - Helping look after lots of pets that aren’t all mine (4 rabbits, 4 guinea pigs, 1 pregnant, 2 cats, 1 puppy)

  9. Family strengths and “weak spots”10-11 years old StrengthsWeak spots • Supporting us when we go - We (kids) lie to mum and dad a lot through phases • Jokes telling - Giving teenagers support and love they need • Understanding - Picking favourites - Able to trust one another - Insults (can escalate to yelling)

  10. Parents/caregivers’ and young people’s views on family DimensionSignificant differences Cohesion Parents > Young people Identity Parents > Young people Mutual activities Parents > Young people Autonomy Parents > Young people Monitoring and supervision Parents > Young people Conflict -----

  11. Parents/caregivers’ and young people’s views on family: the role of family structure DimensionsSignificant differences Cohesion Parents Identity Intact > Lone and Step Young people Intact > Lone and Step

  12. Parents/caregivers’ and young people’s views on family: the role of family structure DimensionsSignificant differences Mutual activities Parents Intact > Lone, Step and Extended Young people Intact > Lone and Extended

  13. Parents/caregivers’ and young people’s views on family: the role of family structure DimensionsSignificant differences Conflict Parents Intact < Lone and Step Young people Intact < Lone and Step

  14. Parents/caregivers’ and young people’s views on family: the role of family structure DimensionsSignificant differences Autonomy No differences according to family structure

  15. Does family structure matter? Well-being perceptions were very similar for young people coming from different family structures; Cigarette, alcohol and pot consumption levels were very similar for young people coming from different family structures. Morality of action’s ratings were very similar for young people belonging to different family structures.

  16. Does family structure matter? Peer orientation and deviant affiliation were higher in young people from lone and extended families; Also, strength of self perceptions were lower in young people from lone and extended families;

  17. Does family structure matter? Coping strategies “Positive” “Negative” Social supportExternalization (Step and Lone > Intact) (Lone and Extended > Intact) Problem solving Avoidance (Step > Intact) (Lone > Intact) Rumination (Extended > Intact)

  18. Family structure: Project’s research directions • Looking at the relationship between family dimensions and several outcomes and examining the moderating role of family structure Family dimensions Young people’s outcomes (e.g. Well-being) Family structure

  19. Family structure: Project’s research directions Examples: √ Is the link between family cohesion and well-being equally important for young people in all family structures? √ Are the links between more mutual activities and less cigarette and alcohol consumption particularly important for young people in lone families? √ Are the links between autonomy and well-being less important for participants in extended families?