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Big Question: How can words change people’s lives?

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Big Question: How can words change people’s lives?

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  1. Big Question: How can words change people’s lives? Title: My Brother Martin Author: Christine King Farris Genre: Biography

  2. Review Games Story Sort Vocabulary Words: Arcade Games Study Stack Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Vocabulary

  3. Small Group Timer

  4. Spelling Words Schwa

  5. stomach memory Canada element mystery science remember forget suppose iron gravel difficult fortune giant architect normal notify privilege cement yesterday ridiculous syllable magnificent asparagus cinnamon

  6. Vocabulary Words Vocabulary Words More Words to Know ancestors avoided generations minister numerous pulpit shielding confronted injustice nourishing demonstrating integrate sympathy

  7. Big Question: How can words change people’s lives? Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

  8. Monday

  9. Today we will learn about: Build Concepts Cause and Effect Answer Questions Build Background Vocabulary Fluency: Model Phrasing Grammar: Conjunctions Spelling: Schwa Equal Opportunities

  10. Monday Fluency: Model Phrasing

  11. Fluency: Phrasing Listen as I read “A Class of One.” As I read, notice how I group words that make sense together. Be ready to answer questions after I finish. What effects did integration have on Ruby and Mrs. Henry? Why does Mrs. Henry call Ruby a Hero?

  12. Concept Vocabulary demonstrating – taking part in a parade or meeting to protest or to make demands integrate– to make public places equally available to people of all races sympathy – agreement; approval; favor Next Side

  13. demonstrating

  14. Concept Vocabulary (To add information to the graphic organizer, click on end show, type in your new information, and save your changes.)

  15. Build Concept Vocabulary: demonstrating, integrate, sympathy Equal Opportunities

  16. Cause and Effect &Answer Questions Turn to pages 608 - 609

  17. Prior KnowledgeWhat do you know about Martin Luther King Jr.? Martin Luther King Jr.

  18. Vocabulary Words

  19. Vocabulary Words ancestors – people from whom you are descended, such as your great-grandparents avoided – kept away from; kept out of the way of generations – periods of about thirty years, or the time to the birth of the next generation

  20. Vocabulary Words minister – member of the clergy; spiritual guide; pastor pulpit – platform or raised structure in a church from which the minister preaches shielding – protecting; defending

  21. More Words to Know confronted – faced boldly; opposed injustice – lack of justice, fairness, lawfulness nourishing – keeping well-fed and healthy; producing health and growth Next Slide

  22. minister

  23. pulpit

  24. Monday Grammar: Conjunctions

  25. why is it important to rimember the lessons of history Why is it important to remember the lessons of history? if we don’t remember History we may make the same mistakes If we don’t remember history, we may make the same mistakes.

  26. Conjunctions They called me Christine, and like three peas in one pod, we grew together. And is a conjunction, a word used to join words, phrases, or sentences. And joins two sentences to form a compound sentence.

  27. Conjunctions Conjunctions are connecting words, such as and, but, and or. They can be used to join words, phrases, and sentences. Use and to add information or to join related ideas: They played soccer and tag.

  28. Conjunctions Use but to join different ideas: Some people were kind, but others were mean. Use or to suggest a choice: We can fight with each other, or we can get along.

  29. Conjunctions Conjunctions also make compound subject, compound predicates, and compound sentences. There is a comma before the conjunction in a compound sentence.

  30. Conjunctions Compound Subject: Christine and M.L. lived in Georgia. Compound Predicate: They grew up and went to school in Atlanta. Compound Sentence: The children wanted to play, but their parents wouldn’t let them. (Note the comma.)

  31. ConjunctionsFind the conjunction in each sentence. Christine King and her brother Martin were born in the same room. and The King children lived with their parents and grandparents. and

  32. ConjunctionsFind the conjunction in each sentence. They had a happy childhood, but life was often unfair. but Black Americans were not allowed to use certain restaurants or hotels. or

  33. ConjunctionsFind the conjunction in each sentence. M.L. vowed to change this injustice, and he did. and

  34. ConjunctionsUse the conjunction and, but, or or to join each pair of sentences. His name was Martin. The family always called him M.L. His name was Martin, but the family always called him M.L. They lived in Atlanta. They worshiped at the Baptist Church. They lived in Atlanta, and they worshiped at the Baptist Church.

  35. ConjunctionsUse the conjunction and, but, or or to join each pair of sentences. The Kings were not wealthy. They were happy. The Kings were not wealthy, but they were happy.

  36. Spelling Words Schwa

  37. stomach memory Canada element mystery science remember forget suppose iron gravel difficult fortune giant architect normal notify privilege cement yesterday ridiculous syllable magnificent asparagus cinnamon

  38. Tuesday

  39. Today we will learn about: Word Structure Cause and Effect Answer Questions Vocabulary Fluency: Echo Reading Grammar: Conjunctions Spelling: Schwa Time for Social Studies: Martin Luther King Jr. Equal Opportunities

  40. Vocabulary Strategy for Endings Turn to pages 640 - 641

  41. My Brother Martin Turn to pages 642 - 649

  42. Tuesday Fluency: Echo Reading

  43. Fluency: Echo Reading Turn to page 646, paragraph 3. As I read, notice which words I group together and how I break up long sentences for meaning. Now we will practice together as a class by doing three echo readings of the paragraph.

  44. Tuesday Grammar: Conjunctions

  45. violence is dramatic and nonviolence is often effectiver Violence is dramatic, but nonviolence is often more effective. its diffecult not to fight back when others are fighting you It’s difficult not to fight back when others are fighting you.

  46. Conjunctions Conjunctions are connecting words, such as and, but, and or. They can be used to join words, phrases, and sentences. Use and to add information or to join related ideas: They played soccer and tag.

  47. Conjunctions Use but to join different ideas: Some people were kind, but others were mean. Use or to suggest a choice: We can fight with each other, or we can get along.

  48. Conjunctions Conjunctions also make compound subject, compound predicates, and compound sentences. There is a comma before the conjunction in a compound sentence.

  49. Conjunctions Compound Subject: Christine and M.L. lived in Georgia. Compound Predicate: They grew up and went to school in Atlanta. Compound Sentence: The children wanted to play, but their parents wouldn’t let them. (Note the comma.)

  50. Spelling Words Schwa