Download
lead not peanut butter n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
LEAD (Not Peanut Butter) PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
LEAD (Not Peanut Butter)

LEAD (Not Peanut Butter)

122 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

LEAD (Not Peanut Butter)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. LEAD (Not Peanut Butter) Written By TJ Fournier Coauthored by Myself

  2. LEAD Atomic Symbol-Pb Atomic Number-82 Atomic Mass-207.2 Atomic Radius-175 PEANUT BUTTER Atomic Symbol-  Atomic Number- $3.95 Atomic Mass-794g Atomic Radius-86mm Periodic Table Information

  3. LEAD Period 6 Group 14 P-Block Poor Metal PEANUT BUTTER Period 3 (Lunchtime) Toppings Group (In my pantry) 2 Block (Chemistry) Delicious Foodstuff Periodic Table Information (cont.)

  4. LEAD Discovered by the ancients (Mentioned in the book of Exodus) Symbol derived from the Latin plumbum Origin of modern name unknown PEANUT BUTTER Discovered by George A. Bayle Jr. in 1890 Symbol derived from the face I make when I eat it Origin of modern name derived from its physical and chemical characteristics History

  5. LEAD Soft, malleable, metallic solid Bluish-gray in color Deflects radiation Specific gravity- 11.3 (?) Poor conductor of electricity PEANUT BUTTER Brown Creamy Physical Properties

  6. LEAD Melting Point- 327.43°C Boiling Point- 1740°C Density- 11.34g/cm³ PEANUT BUTTER Melting Point- Um…(<.<) (>.>) (T.T) Boiling Point- Hot Density- 5.457g/in³* More Physical Properties! *The work that went into finding the density of peanut butter better be appreciated.

  7. PEANUT BUTTER Delicious Goes well with toasted, raisin swirl bread Gets stale and old if left open on the counter Many of the chemical properties of Peanut Butter are unknown at this time Probably because no one cares enough LEAD Rarely found pure in nature Usually combines with zinc, copper and silver Becomes covered in an oxide film when exposed to moist air Reacts vigorously with fluorine (F) at room temperature Reacts well with chlorine (Cl) when warmed Chemical Properties Yes, this is a molecule of peanut butter. … I don’t care if it’s made entirely of lead! … IT’S PEANUT BUTTER!

  8. LEAD Lead Oxide (PbO) is created when lead makes contact with the air, making this element useful in containing sulphuric acid Used extensively in car batteries, projectiles, electrodes in the process of electrolysis, glass for computer and television screens, sound absorber Other compounds used in paint, insecticides, storage batteries Alloys are used in solder, pewter, bullets, antifriction lubricants, plumbing PEANUT BUTTER When placed with jelly on a sandwich, it tastes good When eaten directly, it leaves a foul aftertaste COOKIES! Especially used in making fun of lead, because their abbreviations are so close What a coincidence Who would’ve thought? Oh, wait, me. Uses of the Element

  9. PbO- Lead Oxide- insoluble to sulphuric acid PbF(2)- Lead Fluoride- poisonous PbCl(2)- Lead Chloride- poisonous 2 fluorides, 2 chlorides, 2 bromides, 1 iodide, 1 hydride, 4 oxides, 1 sulfide, 1 selenide, 1 telluride PbJ- Peanut Butter ‘n’ Jelly Sandwich- used in elementary school lunches PbB- Peanut Butter ‘n’ Bananas- used in elementary school lunches PbP- Peanut Butter Pancakes- used in Mrs. Mizak’s kitchen PbC- Peanut Butter ‘n’ Crackers- delicious after school snack Common Compounds

  10. Lead had been mentioned in the Book of Exodus Alchemists attributed lead to the planet Saturn, as being the oldest element on earth Lead can be purified from galena, which can be mined in Australia, which mines 19% of the world’s galena, which is cool because they have kangaroos Lead is one of four metals that have extremely damaging effects on the human body Lead is pyrophoric when divided into a fine powder, making it a fire hazard Peanut butter has 190 calories 17 grams of fat NO CHOLESTEROL! 160mg of sodium (Peaches, go have a party) 7g of carbohydrates 6g of protein 2% calcium (Kristina, you may have a party as well) 4% iron (I don’t know who’s doing iron, but y’all should have a party together. That’d be GROOVY) Interesting Bits of Information

  11. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF LEAD • http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/tp13-c4.pdf • http://www.npi.gov.au/database/substance-info/profiles/50.html#physical • http://chemistry.about.com/od/elementfacts/a/lead.htm • http://www.chemicalelements.com/elements/pb.html • http://www.lenntech.com/Periodic-chart-elements/Pb-en.htm • http://www.webelements.com/webelements/elements/text/Pb/chem.html • PICTURES: • http://www.jif.com/products/images/prod_shoot.jpg • http://www.galleries.com/minerals/elements/lead/lead.jpg • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peanut_butter • Special thank you to Wikipedia for the pictures and the multitudes of information it provide me about peanut butter • Another thanks to Peaches, although it’s hard, but he explained via phone last night what a chemical property was, and proved the entire Interwebs to be a lie. Congratulations. • http://www.1728.com/diamform.htm For giving me the equation for the volume of a cylinder to allow me to find the density of peanut butter