Office of Criminal Justice Services Grant Writing Training - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

office of criminal justice services grant writing training n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Office of Criminal Justice Services Grant Writing Training PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Office of Criminal Justice Services Grant Writing Training

play fullscreen
1 / 36
Download Presentation
Office of Criminal Justice Services Grant Writing Training
109 Views
jerry
Download Presentation

Office of Criminal Justice Services Grant Writing Training

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Office of Criminal Justice ServicesGrant Writing Training Jacquetta Al-Mubaslat Melissa Darby

  2. Agenda • Welcome • Housekeeping • Introductions • Who is OCJS? • OCJS Funding Streams • Grant Making Process • Grant Writing Components • Review of Grant Writing Resources

  3. Introductions • Who are you? • Where are you from? • What do you hope to get out of the training today?

  4. Office of Criminal Justice Services (OCJS) • Ohio Revised Code establishes the Ohio Office of Criminal Justice Services as the lead criminal justice planning agency for the state. Through its research, technology, grants administration and programmatic initiatives, OCJS serves agencies and communities committed to reducing and preventing crime across Ohio.

  5. OCJS Funding Streams • Federal • Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance (JAG/JAG LE) • S.T.O.P. Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) • Residential Substance Abuse Treatment (RSAT) • Family Violence Preventions Services Act (FVPSA) • Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) • National Criminal History Improvement (NCHIP) • Paul Coverdell Forensic Science Improvement • State • Family Violence Prevention Fund (Shelter Funds) • Ohio Drug Law Enforcement Fund

  6. OCJS Funding Streams • Federal Solicitation • Application • Allocation • Pass Through Funds

  7. Grant Making ProcessRequest For Proposal (RFP) • Eligibility Guidelines • Program Purpose • Format and Submission • Body of Proposal • Unallowable Costs

  8. Eligibility Guidelines • Be sure to read eligibility guidelines in all Requests for Proposals. If your agency does not meet these guidelines then funding cannot be approved for your application. • If you have eligibility questions it is recommended to contact the agency issuing the RFP for clarification. • For example - JAG and VAWA funding law enforcement agencies must report crime statistics (OIBRS information) and there must be an eligible subgrantee.

  9. Program and Purpose • Gathering background: • Concept • How does the program that the applicant is requesting funding for fit with the mission and purpose of the agency? • Program • Scope of the project • How it will be implemented • Timeline for the project • Anticipated outcomes and measurement tools • Staffing and volunteer needs • Expenses • Planning stage requires some outline depicting whether budget costs will be in proportion and reasonable to expected outcomes

  10. Format and Submission • Be sure to follow RFP guidelines regarding format and submissions. • Specifically for OCJS you must have the application in the “submitted” status to be considered for funding. • Be sure to include all required elements of the application, i.e. collaboration board letters, match waivers, copy of indirect cost plan, attachment a (VAWA) etc.

  11. Body of Proposal • Problem Statement • Methodology • Project Description • Project Objectives • Timeline/Activities • Organizational Capacity • Collaborations/Partnerships • Executive Summary • Budget

  12. Problem Statement The Problem Statement defines the fundamental problem that the applicant is addressing, and provides a compelling logical reason why the applicant’s proposal should be supported.

  13. Problem Statement • Relates to the purpose and goals of the implementing agency. • Stated in terms of the needs of the clients to be served—not the organization’s needs • Is of reasonable dimensions • Supported by relevant statistical evidence- • Agency, Local, State, National • Supported by relevant objective research pertinent to the problem- • Evidenced-based research, statistics, recognized authorities, surveys • Defines the target population • Answers “Why is this a problem?” • Provides reasoning behind the intervention strategy • Does not make assumptions or use jargon

  14. Methodology • This may not be a specific section of an application, however this is what needs to be thought of when composing various sections of a proposal. • In essence it is a detailed description of the method and process of how the goals and objectives will be accomplished. Includes: • Description of the scope of the work and expected outcomes • Outline of activities • Description of the personnel functions with the names of key staff and consultants if possible.

  15. Methodology-Project Description • Restatement of the problem and the objectives • Describe the process and activities that will be implemented to achieve the objectives. • Reasonable scope of activities within the allotted time. • Discusses the evidence that justifies the approach (model) • Is logical and relates to the needs of the identified target population • Clearly describes the activities and the reason for the selection of the activities • Demonstrates fidelity to the chosen model • Links to evidence based models when appropriate • Discusses the impact of the activities for the target population, the community and the staff that will carryout activities

  16. Methodology-Project Objectives • Objectives are not necessarily goals • Objectives – measurable, concrete, attainable • Goals – abstract, bigger picture, may be unattainable • Objectives-Measurable outcomes of the program • SMART Objectives • S-pecific • M-easurable • A-attainable/Achievable • R-elevant • T-ime bound

  17. Methodology-Project Objectives Process vs Outcome Process Objectives- relate to the method/solution that you are proposing. It is internal – specific to the agency. Example: To offer 5 additional public safety trainings to school-aged children between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2013. Outcome Objectives- relate to the problem/need. It is external – effects the target population. Example: To increase by 30% the number of school-aged children who report a knowledge of how to exit the school during an emergency.

  18. Methodology-Project Objectives Performance Indicator How are you going to measure your outcome? • The Performance Indicator is the information that is collected to document the expected change.

  19. Methodology-Project Objectives Example: To offer 5 additional public safety trainings to school-aged children between January 1, 2013 through December 31, 2013. Performance Indicator: The number of trainings offered

  20. Methodology-Project Objectives Example: To increase by 30% the number of school-aged children who report a knowledge of how to exit the school during an emergency. Performance Indicator: Pre and Post Test

  21. Methodology-Project Objectives Baseline The data that is collected before the program started.

  22. Methodology-Project Objectives Example: To offer 5 additional public safety trainings to school-aged children between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2013. Performance Indicator: The number of trainings offered Baseline: Between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012 3 public safety trainings were offered to school-aged children.

  23. Methodology-Project Objectives Example: To increase by 30% the number of school-aged children who report a knowledge of how to exit the school during an emergency. Performance Indicator: Pre and Post Test Baseline: Between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012 100 Sixth Graders reported knowledge of how to exit the school building during an emergency.

  24. Methodology-Project Objectives Performance Data Collection OCJS requires that applicants submit a description of the method in which the data will be collected and the means by which it will be stored for later analysis.

  25. Methodology-Timeline/Activities Illustrates the project flow from start to end. The Timeline of Activities must identify project strategies and activities and indicate when each strategy/activity begins and ends, how each strategy/activity relates to a stated objective, the evidence or data to be collected for each strategy/activity, and who is responsible for overseeing the strategy/activity.

  26. Methodology-Timeline Activities • Components of a timeline include: • Identifies project activities and when those activities begin and end. • OCJS requires the timeline of activities to include grants management administration and collaboration board activities • Identifies who is responsible for implementing each activity • Identifieshow the activity relates to a stated objective and related data collection activities. • Activities may be ongoing, daily, monthly and quarterly

  27. Methodology-Organizational Capacity • Demonstrate whether your organization has the ability to successfully implement the project design outlined in your grant proposal • Describes: • Organization—Mission/History • Staff—levels, expertise, qualifications/credentials, trainings, cultural competency • Physical Resources—space, technology, relevant equipment • Previous grants administration experience

  28. Methodology-Collaboration/Partnerships • Collaboration Boards are a required OCJS grant component • Collaboration allows groups with a shared purpose to address an identified problem and need within their community • Collaboration Boards allow for the sharing of resources to maximize capacity and the success of project goals and objectives. • Relevancy/Appropriateness • Letters must be uploaded upon submission of the application.

  29. Executive Summary • The Executive Summary serves as a concise and accurate description of the proposed project. • It is a snapshot of the proposed project. • It should not introduce new information that is not included in the full proposal. • Information submitted within the Executive Summary is forwarded to the Governor’s Office, local, state and federal agencies for public information requests.

  30. Executive Summary-Contents • OCJS requires applicants to provide a clear concise information in the following content areas: • Purpose Statement • Problem Statement • Project Description • Participating Agencies/Collaboration

  31. Executive Summary-Purpose Statement • The purpose statement is a clear concise statement that explains the purpose of the project.  It describes what the applicant is going to do; the population that is going to be served; how it will be accomplished; and why it is important. • The information provided within the purpose statement is reported to the FFATA Sub-award Reporting System (FSRS) in response to the Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act (FFATA) Legislation.

  32. Executive Summary-Problem Statement • The Problem Statement within the Executive Summary is a summary of the problem supporting the need for funding. • It should be very clear and compelling. • It should avoid the use of jargon and acronyms (if possible). • It should include relevant statistics that support the need to fund the project.

  33. Executive Summary-Project Description • The Project Description within the Executive Summary serves as a succinct and accurate description of the proposed project and activities that will occur.

  34. Executive Summary-Participating Agencies/Collaboration • Applicants are expected to identify and provide a brief description of the agencies participating in the project. • Who are the relevant agencies participating in the project and what is their role? • Who are the members of the Collaboration Board and how will they provide oversight to the project?

  35. Budget • Should flow naturally from Problem Statement, Project Description and Project Objectives • Consideration should be made to: • Grant funding caps • Dollar amount requested— • If funding caps do not exist, then it is up to the grantee to research costs expected as reasonable for the scope of the project. • Budget narrative-required and is an opportunity to further explain costs essential to the success of your program. • Upload Federally Approved Indirect Costs Plan

  36. Contact Information Melissa Darby – JAG, JAG LE, RSAT 614-728-8740 MBDarby@dps.state.oh.us Jacquetta Al-Mubaslat – VAWA, FVPSA 614-728-7291 JAL-Mubaslat@dps.state.oh.us Rickeya Franklin – NCHIP, PSN, Coverdell 614-466-7690 RNFranklin@dps.state.oh.us Office of Criminal Justice Services 1970 W. Broad Street Columbus, Ohio 43223 614-466-7782-Main Number