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Assessment Happens!

Assessment Happens!

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Assessment Happens!

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  1. Assessment Happens! January 8, 2013 Erik Huntsinger & Pete Turner SAAC Co-Chairs

  2. What’s Happening Today

  3. CATS of the Month! • September - Terry Meyer, Nikol Price, Jennifer Wong, Chris Zagar: Library Skills for CPD • October - Rachel Holmes: SCGR Culture and Diversity Research Paper • November - Steve Griffiths: Group Menu Project CUL105/Enhancement • December: Rachel Smith: An Enhanced Jigsaw Approach to Teach Cell Parts

  4. Spring 2012 Tech Literacy Results How technologically literate are our students?

  5. Key Findings, All Students • Over one-third (37.5%) of participants were in computer or tech-related courses. • Overall, a vast majority showed proficiency or above proficiency for: • Data management (97%) • Assignment content (96%) • Communication (93%) • Layout (96%) • Conventions (93%) • Two deliverable components not scoring as high: • References (64%) • Embedding objects (73%) • Chart to follow

  6. Technological Literacy Results

  7. Numeracy/SCGR Update • Completed in Fall 2012 • Numeracy had 10 faculty participants • SCGR had 14 faculty participants • Please submit results to OPIE! • Results to be shared Fall 2013 AH

  8. Writing Assessment NOW!

  9. Timeline for Writing Assessment • Now – Spring Break: indicate your participation by email to Erik or Pete (RSVP link to be sent today) • Following Spring Break, implement your writing assignment • Grade according to your normal grading technique and guidelines • Send student submissions to Online Writing Center (details TBA)

  10. Thanks to the Writing Center! • Rodica Heinz and the rest! • Will use EMCC Writing Rubric

  11. Next Up… CATS!

  12. Cats of the Month Criteria • Was assessment evident? • Was the loop closed? • Was there demonstrated learning on the part of the students or professor(s)? • Were the ratings positive?

  13. Tips for Creating Quality CATS • Start small…go bigger over time • Follow the “Planning-Implementing-Responding” Loop (Angelo & Cross, 1993)

  14. The “Planning-Implementing-Responding” Loop • Planning – • Start with one course that you know well and are already generally satisfied with • This will hone your confidence and ability while minimizing risks • Choose an approach that works with your teaching style and class structure (Pete will share some examples in a few minutes) • Post proposal in CATS, but indicate loop not closed

  15. The “Planning-Implementing-Responding” Loop • Implementing • Let students know beforehand what is going on • Focus is on learning, not grading • Be clear on details, timing, etc. of the assessment (perhaps write instructions on board) • Anonymous responses can take the pressure off students • Create simple ways for comprehending the data quantitatively- e.g., count most frequently mentioned term/concept, or sort into three piles (on-target, close, off-target)

  16. The “Planning-Implementing-Responding” Loop • Responding (“Closing the Loop”) • Integrate findings into next classes’ lesson plans • Let students know what you learned from the assessment and what difference it will make. (e.g., “40% thought that X was the muddiest point…we will start with a review of this concept) • Let them know what improvements they can make as students to improve their learning • Post results in CATS, and indicate the loop was closed

  17. CATS of the Month! • September - Terry Meyer, Nikol Price, Jennifer Wong, Chris Zagar: Library Skills for CPD • October - Rachel Holmes: SCGR Culture and Diversity Research Paper • November - Steve Griffiths: Group Menu Project CUL105/Enhancement • December: Rachel Smith: An Enhanced Jigsaw Approach to Teach Cell Parts

  18. How did our CATS of the Month measure up?

  19. Sample Assessments Angelo,T.A., & Cross, K.P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers (2nd Ed.). San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons

  20. Minute Paper WHAT: Instructor stops class 2-3 minutes from end, has students respond briefly to a question • “What was the most important thing you learned today?” • “What important questions remain unanswered?” AKA: Half-Sheet Response, Ticket Out the Door Most Useful: Lecture or lecture/discussion courses, lab sessions, study-group meetings, video tapes

  21. Minute Paper Step-by-Step: • Decide focus of question, when to administer, anonymous or not • Before class, write minute paper on board • At convenient time, hand out index cards or half-sheets of scrap paper (can also be at tables at start of class) • Let students know how much time they have, and implement

  22. Categorizing Grid WHAT: Paper-and-Pencil Equivalent of sorting objects and placing in correct category AKA: Meaning Matrix, Sorting Table Most Useful: Can be adopted in most disciplines

  23. Categorizing Grid Step-by-Step: • Select 2-3 categories related to your day’s objective • List several examples/items relevant to each category • Make a grid corresponding to number of categories and have students copy it • List items to be categorized in scrambled order, or can be projected on screen • Students place items in correct category

  24. Example with Math! Terms: • A=S² • C²=A²+B² • A=½bh • P=4S

  25. Concept Map WHAT: Drawings or diagrams showing mental connections between various concepts AKA: Semantic maps, webs, visual organizers, nonlinguistic representations Most Useful: All subjects, can be done at any part of the lesson

  26. Concept Map Step-by-Step: • Select sample concept; make sure it is contextually rich • Model process with that concept • Assign students new concept relevant to day’s objective • Students draw their own maps (can be homework assignment, part of notes sheet, or submitted on separate piece of paper)

  27. Now What?! Read, Rate, Write: • Open up a CATS, any CATS, and read it • Give it a rating • Write a comment to the author(s) • After you write a comment, lunch!

  28. Now What? • Start a CATS • Even if just brainstorming ideas for your assessment, get something down • Recommendation: Start off in a Word document

  29. What’s Happening Today