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ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

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  1. ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Tulsa Public Schools New ELD Teacher Orientation 2012-2013 SY

  2. If Children Don’t Learn the Way We Teach, We Have to Change the Way We Teach - Ignacio “Nacho” Estrada

  3. Objectives • ELL in Tulsa PS • Title III Accountability • Language Proficiency & Academic Achievement • WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards • SIOP – Sheltered Instruction

  4. The ELL Vision Statement • Students will participate in a rigorous academic program including development as an emergent bilingual to become college and career ready in a globally competitive environment.

  5. Tulsa PS ELL Population

  6. Tulsa PS Immigrant Population

  7. Languages Spoken in Tulsa PS

  8. ELL Identification and Eligibility • During new student enrollment… • All students new to the district complete a Home Language Survey. • If there is another language spoken in the home, NCLB requires that the student’s English language proficiency be assessed. • The state of Oklahoma requires an overall score of 5.0 and a literacy score of 4.5 on the ACCESS for ELLs exam to be considered proficient. If the student scores below this, they qualify as an English Language Learner

  9. Exiting the ELL Program • Students are classified as Fluent English Proficient (FEP) when they achieve a composite score of 5.0 AND a literacy score of 4.5 on the ACCESS for ELLs test. • NCLB requires that students’ language proficiency must be monitored for 2 years immediately following the proficient score. • Once a student successfully completes the two years of monitoring following a proficient score, he/she is formally exited from the ELL program.

  10. TITLE III ACCOUNTABILITY

  11. Title III Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives • Per No Child Left Behind Title III Programs must meet Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives • The Title III AMAOs consist of three factors: • Progress in English Language Learning based on ACCESS for ELLs test scores. • Proficiency in English Language Learning based on ACCESS for ELLs test scores. • Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) on the Oklahoma Core Curriculum Tests (OCCT).

  12. LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY & ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

  13. Second Language Acquisition Anticipation Guide

  14. Factors Affecting Second Language Acquisition • Motivation • First language development • Language distance and attitude • Access to the language • Age • Personality and learning style • Peers and role models • Quality of instruction • Cultural Background

  15. General Principles of L2 Development Research confirms that language acquisition is enhanced when: • attention is given to background knowledge and experience. • the content and language are real and purposeful. • language is made comprehensible. • anxiety is low. • interaction is high.

  16. Cummins Iceberg Theory BICS CALP

  17. Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (BICS) • Skills involved in everyday communication; listening, speaking, carrying on basic conversation, understanding speakers & getting basic needs met • Pronunciation • Grammar • Vocabulary • Not related to academic achievement • Universal across all native speakers • Attained after 2 or 3 years in the host country

  18. Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP) • Skills that are needed to succeed in the academic classroom; problem solving, inferring, analyzing, synthesizing & predicting • Language of the classroom; decontextualized • Language outside of immediate interpersonal context • CALP in 1st & 2nd language overlaps in spite of differences in language • Related to literacy skills • Attained between 5 to 7 years in the host country

  19. Language Proficiency… • is an outgrowth of cumulative experiences both inside and outside of school. • can reflect complex thinking when linguistic complexity is reduced and support is present. • both socially and academically are required for school success.

  20. What Makes Academic Content Easy or Hard for ELL Students?

  21. Easy Some notation is the same Some is “hands-on” Some concepts transfer Lower volume of written material Computation uses less “language” Hard Some notation is different Some processes are different Word problems, vocabulary Concepts are often abstract Math

  22. Easy Demonstrations, “hands-on” Visuals, pictures, diagrams Hard Cause-effect, if-then relationships Hypothesis-testing Volume of vocabulary Terms with technical & non-technical meanings (table, kingdom, power, etc.) Science

  23. Easy Interesting to different cultures Opportunities to incorporate ELL students’ culture Hard Technical & non-technical terms (subjects, power, etc.) Volume of reading Cultural assumptions are not always explicit Abstract concepts Social Studies

  24. Easy Interesting to student from another culture Opportunities to incorporate ELL students’ culture Hard Volume of readingrequires analysis & evaluation Required background knowledge Variety of language used (poetry, Shakespeare, root words, etc.) Literature

  25. Do you speak Math? The number a is five less than the number b Without the proficiency required to understand the linguistic complexity of this sentence, you may incorrectly translate that as: a = 5 – b rather than the correct translation: a = b - 5

  26. WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards

  27. WIDA’s English Language Proficiency Standards Focus • Social, intercultural, and instruction language • The language of language arts • The language of math • The language of science • The language of social studies

  28. Why are English language proficiency standards necessary? • To provide access for ELLs to academic achievement and educational equity • To provide a curriculum/assessment resource anchored in academic content standards • To establish a common yardstick to define and measure how ELLs acquire language across the domains of listening, speaking, reading, and writing • To comply with federal law

  29. WIDA ELP Standards Standard 1- SIL: English language learners communicate for SOCIAL AND INSTRUCTIONAL purposes within the school setting. Standard 2 – LoLA: English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of LANGUAGE ARTS. Standard 3– LoMA:English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of MATHEMATICS. Standard 4– LoSC:English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of SCIENCE. Standard 5 – LoSS:English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of SOCIAL STUDIES.

  30. Four Language Domains Listening ─ process, understand, interpret, and evaluate spoken language in a variety of situations Speaking ─ engage in oral communication in a variety of situations for a variety of purposes and audiences Reading ─process, interpret, and evaluate written language, symbols, and text with understanding and fluency Writing ─ engage in written communication in a variety of forms for a variety of purposes and audiences

  31. Levels of English Language Proficiency 6 5 REACHING BRIDGING 4 EXPANDING 3 DEVELOPING 2 BEGINNING 1 ENTERING

  32. Language Proficiency Levels& Criteria for Performance Definitions Linguistic Complexity Vocabulary Usage Language Control 6 1 2 3 4 5 ENTERING BEGINNING DEVELOPING EXPANDING BRIDGING REACHING

  33. Performance Definitions

  34. LESSON PLANNING and ACADEMIC LANGUAGE

  35. Differentiation Differentiated Instruction historically, and according to its author (Tomlinson), refers to ways lessons can be differentiated to address learning styles of students. In the case of English Language Learners, lessons must be differentiated according to the student’s level of English language proficiency.

  36. Differentiation What can teachers use as a guide to differentiate instruction according the student’s level of English language proficiency?

  37. What information do you find in a Teacher Report? Make a list

  38. TeacherReport Demographic Information About the Student Student’s Scale Score by Domain Student’s ELP Level by Domain Student’s Scale Composite Scores Student’s Composite Scores Student’s Speaking Performance by Standard Student’s Comprehension by Standard Student’s Writing Performance by Standard Description of the ELP Levels

  39. Differentiation Starts with knowing the student’s Language Proficiency Level and performance definitions. Examining the standards and defining the language function. Defining the connection to Academic Content. Selecting the appropriate scaffolding or support.

  40. Strategies Scaffolding Pre-teaching Re-teaching Structures Large group Small group Triads Partners Individual Differentiating Process

  41. Differentiating Product Oral presentations Written reports Performance assessments Portfolios

  42. WIDA + SIOP = Student Success

  43. What is Sheltered Instruction? • A means for making grade-level academic content (e.g., science, social studies, math) more accessible for English language learners while at the same time promoting their English language development.

  44. What is Sheltered Instruction? • The practice of highlighting key language features and incorporating strategies that make the content comprehensible to students.

  45. What is Sheltered Instruction? • An approach that can extend the time students have for getting language support services while giving them a jumpstart on the content subjects they need for graduation.

  46. Building Background Comprehensible Input Preparation Review/ Assessment Strategies SIOP Lesson Delivery Interaction Practice/ Application

  47. Content Objectives Language Objectives Content Concepts Supplementary materials Adaptation of Content Meaningful Activities Preparation

  48. Building Background Comprehensible Input Preparation Review/ Assessment Strategies SIOP Lesson Delivery Interaction Practice/ Application

  49. Building Background • Concepts linked to background experience • Links made between past learning and new concepts • Key vocabulary, semantic features, and discourse structures emphasized

  50. Building Background Comprehensible Input Preparation Review/ Assessment Strategies SIOP Lesson Delivery Interaction Practice/ Application