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Writing Across the Curriculum Osborne Middle School PowerPoint Presentation
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Writing Across the Curriculum Osborne Middle School

Writing Across the Curriculum Osborne Middle School

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Writing Across the Curriculum Osborne Middle School

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    1. Writing Across the Curriculum Osborne Middle School

    2. Laying the Groundwork 2006-07 LA teachers condense new state writing rubric to one page Staff development for LA teachers on writing instruction All science and social studies teachers trained on writing rubric LA, SCI, and SS teachers score fall writing prompt All teachers incorporate writing into curriculum

    3. 2007-08 Fall All LA, SCI, & SS teachers review rubric and anchor papers All LA, SCI, & SS teachers score fall writing prompt All content areas required to include essay questions on common assessments Staff development this summer for SCI and SS teachers

    4. Monitoring AP for each curriculum area Attend weekly curriculum meetings Provides vertical planning/sharing of ideas Walk throughs to monitor implementation

    5. Collaboration Key to Success Social Studies and Science teachers collaborate with the Language Arts teachers on all phases of writing across the curriculum.

    6. PFAT Chart: Staying Focused (Understanding the Prompt)

    7. The Writing Process Students learn to apply the writing process in their social studies and science classes.

    8. Graphic Organizers Graphic organizers are used during pre-writing to enhance student understanding. *The Writing Process * Writing Prompts

    9. Revision Writing focus must be on Ideas during the revision process Students are given specific activities to assist in the revision process -Peer reads paper aloud to writer -Peer highlights topic sentences in one color and supporting details in another color.

    10. Editing/GUMS (Grammar, Usage, Mechanics, and Spelling) Final phase before final draft is written Student focus shifts to GUMS

    11. Models Provide students with examples of: exemplary student writing teacher written responses model high school prompts

    12. Continued Collaboration Continued collaboration is essential Process for teachers Process for students

    13. Writing Prompt Writing Situation Scientists who study volcanoes are called volcanologists. In order to help understand volcanoes, volcanologists classify volcanoes into one of several categories. This helps people to understand what will happen when the volcanoes erupt. Writing Directions Write a minimum of a two paragraph response that compares and contrasts the composite volcano and the shield volcano. In your essay, be sure to do the following: Tell how these two volcanoes are alike. Be sure to include internal structure and what the volcano produces. Finally, tell how these two volcanoes are different.

    14. Document A

    15. Document B This document compares the size of Mount Rainier, a composite volcano, to Mauna Loa, a shield volcano. Mount Rainier - composite volcano

    16. Student Example Volcanoes have created some of the coolest landforms on Earth. Rocks and other stuff formed from lava create different types of volcanic mountains. Shield volcanoes are formed when thin layers of lava pour out of the top vent and the side vents of the volcano and harden on top of other layers that have been there. The lava gradually builds up a gently sloping mountain. An example of a shield volcano is Mauna Loa that over time built the islands of Hawaii. Composite volcanoes are different from shield volcanoes because sometimes there are explosions of ash and cinder. Instead of sloping mountains, the volcanoes are tall and cone-shaped. Examples of composite volcanoes are Mount Fuji and Mount St. Helens.

    17. Writing Opportunities Labs Quizzes Daily writing activities

    18. Student Example Lab Question Why do you not want the two chemicals to mix? Student answer #1: The chemicals when mixed together might cause an explosion. Student answer #2: If the two chemicals were mixed, you could not tell which chemical caused the flame to turn which color. In other words you have more than one manipulated variable. Also you should not mix unknown chemicals because they might react.

    19. Student Example One Body Paragraph Almost every kind of energy transfer you can imagine is used in a Rube Goldburg machine. One of those many transfers is gravitational potential to kinetic. This means that the object has the potential to be dropped, and it will turn into kinetic energy as soon as it is dropped. Some everyday examples of this transfer are a person wearing a heavy backpack or a person at a high peak of a swing. When a person has a heavy backpack, they want to take it off, so the back pack has gravitational potential energy, but as soon as it is let off the persons back, it has kinetic energy until it hits the floor. Also, if a person is at the highest peak of a swing, they have a large amount of gravitational potential energy, because they have a very long way to fall on the swing. But as soon as the person starts going downward, they have kinetic energy and their potential energy decreases. In the Rube Goldburg machines that are being created in class, there are many examples of this energy transfer.

    20. Writing on Demand Essays- timed writing (1 or 2 class periods) Summary activity- follow up to two-column notes Engagement activity (developing fluency)

    21. Writing Prompt Georgia History Writing Situation South Carolina seceded from the Union on December 20, 1860. Many Georgians supported this action while others opposed this decision. On January 16, 1861 a special convention was requested by Governor Brown to discuss the possibility of Georgia seceding from the Union. Writing Directions Write a letter to Governor Brown persuading him to secede from the Union or persuading him to remain loyal to the United States and not secede from the Union. Support your point of view with historical facts, examples, and details that prove your point of view. Remember to use proper grammar and punctuation throughout your letter.

    22. Writing on Demand Summary/Engagement Activity Besides slavery, what were the major issues dividing the North and South? Was General Shermans destructive march through Georgia really necessary? What did it accomplish? Why do you think the slave codes were so effective in keeping the blacks enslaved?

    23. Common Rubric Rubric for each assessment and/or assignment Evolving to common school-wide rubric

    24. Georgia History Essay Rubric for Gov. Brown Letter

    25. OMS Writing Rubric

    26. Key Topic for slides 2-6: Compare plant and animal cells. Blue coding = supporting idea (topic sentence) Maroon coding = major detail (develops the supporting idea but generally rather than specifically) Green coding = specific detail (develops the supporting idea specifically)

    27. Examples of Depth of Development in Score Point 1 Ideas Score: 1 There are two major types of cells in the worldplant and animal. Plant cells have cell walls. Animal cells do not have cell walls. Plant cells have one large vacuole or sac. Animal cells have numerous small vacuoles. These two cells are similar because each has a nucleus, or control center of the cell. Development is limited to a list of similarities and differences between plant cells and animal cells.

    28. Examples of Depth of Development in Score Point 2 There are two major types of cells in the worldplant and animal. Plant and animal cells are similar and different in many ways. Plant cells have cell walls. Animal cells do not have cell walls. Also, plant cells have one large vacuole or sac. Animal cells have numerous small vacuoles. These two cells are similar because each has a nucleus, or control center of the cell. Plant and animal cells make up two types of organisms, autotrophs and heterotrophs. Autotrophs make their own food. Only plants are autotrophs. Animal cells make up heterotrophs. Heterotrophs must find their food. Development is relevant to the topic, but it is limited.

    29. Example of Depth of Development in Score Point 3 Billions of miniature structures fill up the bodies of every organism that has ever existed. Cells are everywhere. They are a part of every single living thing in the world, yet they are too tiny to see with the naked eye. Under a microscope, however, cells are magnified so humans can understand each function of each part of a single cell. There are two major types of cells in the worldplant and animal. Plant and animal cells are similar and different in many ways. Some differences have to do with the parts that make up plant cells and animal cells. For instance, a cell wall, a rigid structure on the outside of a cell that supports and protects the cell, is only found in plant cells. Animal cells do not have cell walls. Also, plant cells have one large vacuole or sac that stores food, water, and waste products. Animal cells have numerous small vacuoles. These two cells are similar because each has a nucleus, or control center of the cell that directs every function. Both also have ribosomes which produce the proteins that the cell needs. Plant and animal cells make up two types of organisms, autotrophs and heterotrophs. Only plant cells make up autotrophs. Autotrophs use the cells chloroplast to capture energy from the sun and use it to produce food. This process is called photosynthesis. Animal cells, on the other hand, only make up heterotrophs. Heterotrophs cannot make their own food so they eat either autotrophs or other heterotrophs. Some specific development in the two body paragraphs; a conclusion would provide a stronger sense of completeness. This paper is a high 3.

    30. Example of Depth of Development in Score Point 4 Billions of miniature structures fill up the bodies of every organism that has ever existed. Cells are everywhere. They are a part of every single living thing in the world, yet they are too tiny to see with the naked eye. Under a microscope, however, cells are magnified so humans can understand each function of each part of a single cell. There are two major types of cells in the worldplant and animal. Plant and animal cells are similar and different in many ways. Some differences have to do with the parts that make up plant cells and animal cells. For instance, a cell wall, a rigid structure on the outside of a cell that supports and protects the cell, is only found in plant cells. Animal cells do not have cell walls. Also, plant cells have one large vacuole or sac that stores food, water, and waste products. Animal cells have numerous small vacuoles. These two cells are similar because each has a nucleus, or control center of the cell that directs every function. Both also have ribosomes which produce the proteins that the cell needs. Plant and animal cells make up two types of organisms, autotrophs and heterotrophs. Only plant cells make up autotrophs. Autotrophs use the cells chloroplast to capture energy from the sun and use it to produce food. This process is called photosynthesis. Animal cells, on the other hand, only make up heterotrophs. Heterotrophs cannot make their own food so they eat either autotrophs or other heterotrophs. That sounds cruel, but hey, its survival of the fittest out there. Now that you know about some of the differences between plant and animal cells, I think you should take a look at each under a microscope. Heres a quiz question to see if you were paying attention. If you are looking at a cell from an autotroph under a miscroscope, will you be able to locate a cell wall? A clever conclusion is the big difference between this example the previous one. This conclusion, plus an additional sentence of development in the third paragraph, push this paper in the 4 range.

    31. Example of Depth of Development in Score Point 5 Billions of miniature structures fill up the bodies of every organism that has ever existed. Cells are everywhere. They are a part of every single living thing in the world, yet they are too tiny to see with the naked eye. Under a microscope, however, cells are magnified so humans can understand each function of each part of a single cell. There are two major types of cells in the worldplant and animal. Plant and animal cells are not all alike. Some differences have to do with the parts that make up plant cells and animal cells. For instance, a cell wall, a rigid structure on the outside of a cell that supports and protects the cell, is only found in plant cells. One cool thing about the cell wall is that it permits good elements, like water, to enter the cell, but it prevents toxins from coming in and wreaking havoc. Thats kind of like a spam filter on an email account. Animal cells do not have cell walls. Also, plant cells have one large vacuole or sac that stores food, water, and waste products. Animal cells have numerous small vacuoles. There are some interesting similarities, however, between plant and animal cells. Each has a nucleus, or control center of the cell that directs every function. The nucleus contains long chains of DNA that make up the organisms genetic code. So when you think of hair and eye color, think of the nucleus. Both also have ribosomes which produce the proteins that the cell needs. Some ribosomes move freely about the cell and others are bound to the cell membrane. Plant and animal cells make up two types of organisms, autotrophs and heterotrophs. Only plant cells make up autotrophs. Autotroph actually means self nutrition. They use the cells chloroplast to capture energy from the sun and use it to produce food. This process is called photosynthesis. Animal cells, on the other hand, only make up heterotrophs, which means other nutrition. Heterotrophs cannot make their own food so they eat either autotrophs or other heterotrophs. That sounds cruel, but hey, its survival of the fittest out there. Now that you know about some of the differences between plant and animal cells, I think you should take a look at each under a microscope. Heres a quiz question to see if you were paying attention. If you are looking at a cell from an autotroph under a miscroscope, will you be able to locate a cell wall? This example contains full development, and the writer is really interacting with the content (e.g., The nucleus contains long chains of DNA that make up the organisms genetic code. So when you think of hair and eye color, think of the nucleus.)

    32. Work in Progress Summer workshop for science/social studies teachers to gain better understanding of the depth of development Ongoing collaboration between the language arts teachers and the content teachers Debriefing after each writing activity and writing assessment One multi-paragraph writing prompt required per nine weeks