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Advertising Creativity & Marketing Creativity

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  1. Advertising Creativity & Marketing Creativity • The Creative Revolution • The Marketing Revolution • The Rise of “IMC”

  2. The Creative Revolution: • 1960-1969 - Cultural Forces • Countercultural movements • “Break the rules” • 1950-1969 - Business Forces • A New Breed of Agencies • A New communication style • Three Influential individuals...

  3. Three Key Individuals • Bill Bernbach, Doyle Dane Bernbach (DDB)

  4. Three Key Individuals • Leo Burnett, Chicago, IL “If you reach for the stars, you might not get one, but you won’t come up with a handful of mud, either.”

  5. Three Key Individuals • David Ogilvy • Came from UK to start agency – Ogilvy & Mather • Wrote books about advertising

  6. Know Who This Is? • He’s Paul Rand • Very Influential Graphic Designer • The key - surprising combinations of words & visuals • Paul Rand worked with Bill Bernbach

  7. Bill Bernbach • Started as writer for head of World’s Fair • Meets Paul Rand at small ad agency • Moves to Grey - becomes Copy Chief • 1949 - Starts “DDB” - Doyle Dane Bernbach

  8. The DDB Style: • Ohrbach’s - their first account.

  9. The DDB Style: • Ohrbach’s - their first account.

  10. The DDB Style: • Ohrbach’s - their first account.

  11. The DDB Style: • Ohrbach’s - their first account. • Levy’s - diversity w. “effective surprise”

  12. Polaroid - dramatic visual demonstration The DDB Style: • Ohrbach’s - their first account. • Levy’s - diversity w. “effective surprise”

  13. The DDB Style: • Ohrbach’s - their first account. • Levy’s - diversity w. “effective surprise” • Polaroid - dramatic visual demonstration • Jamaica - one word and a visual...

  14. The DDB Style (cont): • 3 Key Campaigns: • Mobil - “We Want You to Live”

  15. The DDB Style (cont): • 3 Key Campaigns: • Avis - Helped inspire “Positioning”

  16. The DDB Style (cont): • 3 Key Campaigns: • VW - Campaign of The Century

  17. The DDB Style (cont): • 3 Key Campaigns: • VW - Campaign of The Century

  18. The DDB Influence: • A New Way of Creating Ads • Writer/Art Director Team • “The Concept” • A New Industry Standard - in every award show • “Ad Age” chose Bernbach as their “Ad Man of the Century”

  19. The Burnett Style • “Inherent Drama” • Red meat on a red background • Leo believed you could find it in almost anything. After all, it was “inherent” • Leo believed you could find it in almost anything.

  20. The Burnett Style • “Inherent Drama” • Here’s how Leo’s agency captured the wholesome personality of a Kellogg’s breakfast

  21. Powerful, instinctive, and long-lasting imagery The Burnett Style • “Inherent Drama” • Powerful, instinctive

  22. The Burnett Style • “Inherent Drama” • The Lonely Maytag Repairman - a dramatic and engagingly human personification of reliability • The Lonely Maytag Repairman

  23. The Burnett Style • “Inherent Drama” • So, how do you give personality to a can of refrigerated dough?

  24. The Burnett Style • “Inherent Drama” • OK, how about cans of peas and corn? • OK then, how about new frozen vegetables?

  25. The Burnett Style • “Inherent Drama” • Tuna fish? • Sorry, Charlie, we just want tuna that tastes good.

  26. The Burnett Style • “Inherent Drama” • Cat food? • There’s a little bit of Morris in just about every cat owner’s cat.

  27. The Burnett Style • “Inherent Drama” • Cookies? • Made by elves who live in a hollow tree, and we almost believe it. • Made by elves who live in a hollow tree,

  28. The Burnett Style • “Inherent Drama” • It made Leo’s agency’s campaigns long-lasting and part of our culture • “The glacier-like power of friendly familiarity.” • Time Magazine chose Leo Burnett as their “Ad Man of the Century”

  29. The Ogilvy Approach • Now, let’s look at some early work by David Ogilvy. • He took classic lessons on copywriting and added his own wit and style • The result was advertising that added an extra value for the brand… image

  30. The Ogilvy Approach • Craftsmanship • Research - headline was from a British car magazine • Editing - all copy is tight and bright • Wit - upscale w/o being a snob Rolls-Royce

  31. The Ogilvy Approach • Story Value • Imagery - one small device - the eye patch - adds interest Hathaway Shirts

  32. The Ogilvy Approach • Story Value • Imagery - one small device - the eye patch - adds interest • Repetition - Ogilvy knewadvertising takes time to build - this one device let him tell his story over and over. Hathaway Shirts

  33. The Ogilvy Approach • “Rules” • Here, a similar but different approach for Schweppes - why? • Because Ogilvy believed you should • Find out what works - and repeat it. Schweppes

  34. The Ogilvy Approach • Ogilvy grew his agency into a world-class organization, with • New generations of capable management • World-class clients • Long-term relationships • Over time, his agency was the most successful.

  35. Marketing Revolution: • 1970-1979 • Tougher economic times • New, more “scientific” tools: • Brand Management • Market Research • Segmentation • “Positioning”

  36. Brand Management • Neil McElroy’s Idea • At P&G (1931) • Competitive brands within a company • Becomes standard for marketing organization • Becomes head of P&G • Becomes Eisenhower’s Secretary of Defense

  37. Market Research • The Result - companies understand their consumers more accurately • The Result - a shift to a marketing-driven perspective from a product or production-driven perspective • The Result - manufacturers begin to evolve into marketers

  38. Segmentation • Product differentiation in response to consumers’ differing needs • Maximize potential market share

  39. Positioning: • Positioning was a new perspective on the marketplace. • There were too many products, and too many messages. • Marketers had to deal with this new marketing reality.

  40. Positioning: • The Positioning authors said advertising had to evolve from hard-sell “reason why” ads... • Through image ads... • Through image ads... to advertising based on “the mind of the consumer” • What was that mind?

  41. Positioning: • Though the mind of the consumer was overloaded with messages... • in most product categories, there were very simple heirarchies... The product ladder

  42. Positioning: • Within each category, there are four basic types of positions… • The Best Position • The Against Position • The “Niche” Position • The New Category

  43. Example: Crest The Best Position • In most categories, there is a #1 in the consumer’s mind • The “Best” Position leverages this

  44. Example: Avis “We’re only #2. We try harder.” The Against Position • The “Against” Position defines itself vs. #1. • It’s an aggressive and competitive position

  45. Example: 7Up “The UnCola” The Against Position • The “Against” Position defines itself vs. #1. • It’s an aggressive and competitive position

  46. The Against Position • The “Against” Position defines itself vs. #1. • It’s an aggressive and competitive position • Example: Take The Pepsi Challenge!

  47. The Against Position • The “Against” Position defines itself vs. #1. • It’s an aggressive and competitive position • Example: Take The Pepsi Challenge!

  48. Example: All-Temperature Cheer The Niche Position • The “Niche” Position promotes the product along one dimension of superiority

  49. Example: Smartphones The New Category • The New Category is just that. It defines a category that didn’t exist before and then positions the (new) product as the best in that new category. Competition follows.

  50. Marketers Dominate • Client personnel (marketers) now better trained; better paid • Mergers begin - clients get bigger • Competition toughens • Comparative ads • The tempo increases...