Download
the population of the uk n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
The Population of the UK PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
The Population of the UK

The Population of the UK

75 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

The Population of the UK

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. The Populationof the UK A different view of life in the United Kingdom by Danny Dorling and Benjamin D. Hennig

  2. The Population of the UK • Overview of the Chapters • Maps…a different view of the United Kingdom • Birth…and the suburban pied piper • Education…the sorting out of children • Identity…labelling people and places • Politics…counting democracy, wasting votes • Inequality…income, poverty and wealth • Health…the sedimentation of society • Work…the segmentation of society • Home…the settlements of society • Abroad…the Kingdom’s place in the world

  3. Chapter 1 Maps…a different viewof the United Kingdom

  4. Data source: Population: SEDAC Columbia University (2010); Topography: U.S. Geological Survey (2011) People and Land in the United Kingdom The cartogram gives every person the same amount of space. Each grid cell on the cartogram relates to an equal-sized grid cell on the land area map. In the cartogram, each grid cell is resized according to the number of people living in that space. Maps…a different view of the United Kingdom Figure 1.1

  5. Data source: European Constituencies obtained from the House of Commons Research Paper 98/102 The Constituencies that never were Major UK cities and the 1999 UK European Constituencies projected on a gridded population cartogram Maps…a different view of the United Kingdom Figure 1.2

  6. People aged 18 • Counts by European Constituency area for the year 2000 • Data source: Estimated from school rolls of 15 year olds in 1997 and 2000 mid-year estimate for Northern Ireland Maps…a different view of the United Kingdom Figure 1.3

  7. Proportion of people aged 18 • Counts by European Constituency area for the year 2000 • Data source: Estimated from school rolls of 15 year olds in 1997 and 2000 mid-year estimate for Northern Ireland Maps…a different view of the United Kingdom Figure 1.4

  8. Proportion of 18 year oldsgoing to university • Data for the year 2000 • Data source: Successful UCAS under age 21 applicants from National Statistics website and estimated for Scotland and Northern Ireland Maps…a different view of the United Kingdom Figure 1.5

  9. Educational participation rates at age 18 Data given for selected Western European countries Data source: Full-time participation in secondary education at age 18 in 1996, Social Trends 30 Maps…a different view of the United Kingdom Figure 1.6

  10. People under 21 attending university by social class The six social classes shown above are based on the occupations of the parents of those young adults whose chances are being depicted – Data source: Social Trends 30, data from the National Statistics website (for GB) Maps…a different view of the United Kingdom Figure 1.7

  11. Differences between observedand expected university entry rates • Allowing for the geography of children’s social class; Northern Ireland is excluded as no comparable census data was available • Data source: Successful UCCAs under age 21 applicants from National Statistics website Maps…a different view of the United Kingdom Figure 1.8

  12. Key Point Summary • • It is helpful to look at the population of the UK with a map based on that that population • • Life chances can be shown on such a map, such as the chance of going to university • • Such chances alter over time, across space and are often influenced by social class Maps…a different view of the United Kingdom

  13. Chapter 2 Birth…and the suburban pied piper

  14. Number of live births in Britain, 1900-2010 Data source: ONS and GRO (Scotland) websites Birth…and the suburban pied piper Figure 2.1

  15. Proportion of live births that were female in Britain, 1900-2010 Data source: ONS and GRO (Scotland) websites Birth…and the suburban pied piper Figure 2.2

  16. Students in the UK, cohort size and proportions, 1970-2008 Figures are by entry year; women born in 1982 have their three bars outlined in red Data source: Social Trends 32 and 41 and ONS and GRO (Scotland) websites Birth…and the suburban pied piper Figure 2.3

  17. Participation in higher education by social class, 1995-1998 Social class is assigned through information collected by the Youth Cohort Survey on the occupation (using Standard Occupational Classification categories) of parent or guardian with the highest income in the household - Data source: Department for Education and Skills; Office for National Statistics; Universities and Colleges Admission Service; Social Trends 30; HEFCE Consultation paper, Supply and demand in higher education, HEFCE 01/62, 2001 Birth…and the suburban pied piper Figure 2.4

  18. Where 18 year olds moved to(and where they left) • Net number since birth;Counts by European Constituency area • Data source: Estimated from school rolls of 15 year olds in 1997 less the count of babies in the 1981 Census Birth…and the suburban pied piper Figure 2.5

  19. Net migration to age 18 (1982-2000) by GCSEs at age 15/16 Each point is a 1999 European parliamentary constituency in Britain Data source: 1981, 1991 and 2001 Censuses, Analysis of national school league tables for Britain 1993-99 Birth…and the suburban pied piper Figure 2.6

  20. In-migration of children • Shown as a proportion of out-migration • Data source: 1991 Census special migration statistics children aged 1-15 Birth…and the suburban pied piper Figure 2.7

  21. Babies born to teenagers, 1991-98 • Counts by European Constituency area • Data source: Birth records by mother's age at birth Birth…and the suburban pied piper Figure 2.8

  22. Babies born to teenagers and university entry rates Each point is a 1999 European parliamentary constituency area Data source: ONS and GRO (Scotland) websites; successful UCAS under age 21 applicants from National Statistics website and estimated for Scotland and Northern Ireland; birth records by mother's age at birth Birth…and the suburban pied piper Figure 2.9

  23. Babies born to mothers aged 35 or over1991-98 • Counts by European Constituency area • Data source: Birth records by mother's age at birth Birth…and the suburban pied piper Figure 2.10

  24. Key Point Summary • • The number of babies born alters over time, as does the proportion born female/male • • Children migrate in directions which are predictable in aggregate, out of city centres • • Older mothers in the UK are found to give birth most often in the South East of England Birth…and the suburban pied piper

  25. Chapter 3 Education…the sorting out of children

  26. Children doing well at age 11 • Ratio of numbers achieving a score greater than four to those achieving less than four in 1998 • Data source: Key Stage 2 results from neighbourhood statistics website Figure 3.1 Education…the sorting out of children

  27. Children achieving no qualificationsby age 15/16, 1993-1999 • The proportions of children receiving no GCSE results are shown • Data source: Analysis of national school league tables for Britain 1993-99 Figure 3.2 Education…the sorting out of children

  28. Children achieving few qualificationsby age 15/16, 1993-1999 • The proportions of children receiving less than five GCSEs at level A-G are shown • Data source: Analysis of national school league tables for Britain 1993-99 Figure 3.3 Education…the sorting out of children

  29. Children achieving low qualificationsby age 15/16, 1993-1999 • The proportions of all children receiving fewer than five A-C GCSE results are shown • Data source: Analysis of national school league tables for Britain 1993-99 Figure 3.4 Education…the sorting out of children

  30. Children aged 15/16 1993-99 by school type & GCSEs Charts are drawn in proportion to total numbers of children attending each type of school and shaded by the shares awarded particular grades - Data source: Analysis of national school league tables for Britain 1993-00 Figure 3.5 Education…the sorting out of children

  31. Children attending private schoolsat age 15, 1993-1999 • Data source: Analysis of national school league tables for Britain 1993-99 Figure 3.6 Education…the sorting out of children

  32. Annual decline in childrengiven low qualifications, 1993-1999 • Average fall in the numbers receiving lower than five A-C GCSE grades at age 15/16 as a proportion of those numbers • Data source: Analysis of national school league tables for Britain, 1993-99 Figure 3.7 Education…the sorting out of children

  33. Students aged 16+ in education • Absolute counts in 2001 by European Constituency area • Data source: Analysis of the 2001 Census Key Statistics by local authority Figure 3.8 Education…the sorting out of children

  34. University graduates aged 21+ • Absolute counts in 2001 by European Constituency area • Data source: Analysis of the 2001 Census Key Statistics by local authority Figure 3.9 Education…the sorting out of children

  35. Change in area share of graduatesaged 21+, 1971-2001 • Figures show the 2001 share of the total graduate proportion less the 1971 share • Data source: Analysis of the 2001 Census Key Statistics by local authority and the 1971 Census Figure 3.10 Education…the sorting out of children

  36. Key Point Summary • • Most children in Britain either fail at school or are labelled second class at university • • The type of school a child in Britain attends has a huge influence on his or her exam results • • Getting high exam results is more about social sorting than about being clever Education…the sorting out of children

  37. Chapter 4 Identity…labelling people and places

  38. Women & men and the sexing of places • The most unusually large group displayed here is shown when each area is compared with the UK average • Data source: Analysis of the 2001 Census Key Statistics by local authority Figure 4.1 Identity…labelling people and places

  39. Age and the ageing of place • The most unusually large group displayed here is shown when each area is compared with the UK average • Data source: Analysis of the 2001 Census Key Statistics by local authority Figure 4.2 Identity…labelling people and places

  40. Ethnicity and the colour of place • The most unusually large group displayed here is shown when each area is compared with the UK average • Data source: Analysis of the 2001 Census Key Statistics by local authority Figure 4.3 Identity…labelling people and places

  41. Religion and the spirituality of place • The most unusually large group displayed here is shown when each area is compared with the UK average • Data source: Analysis of the 2001 Census Key Statistics by local authority Figure 4.4 Identity…labelling people and places

  42. Single, married, divorced,remarried and widowed • The most unusually large group displayed here is shown when each area is compared with the UK average • Data source: Analysis of the 2001 Census Key Statistics by local authority Figure 4.5 Identity…labelling people and places

  43. Through the keyhole:Household composition in Britain • The most unusually large group displayed here is shown when each area is compared with the UK average • In the case of conflicts, then the following household types which appear first in this order got priority: Married (with kids), Married (kids returned), Married (no kids), Other (with kids), Lone parent, Cohabiting couple (no kids), Lone pensioner, Lone adult, Student, Pensioner, Mixed • Data source: Analysis of the 2001 Census Key Statistics by local authority Figure 4.6 Identity…labelling people and places

  44. Migration in England and Wales • The most unusually large group displayed here is shown when each area is compared with the England and Wales average • Data source: Analysis of the 2001 Census Key Statistics by local authority Figure 4.7 Identity…labelling people and places

  45. Lifetime and annual immigration • The most unusually large group displayed here is shown when each area is compared with the UK average • Data by 2001; all immigrants since 2000 are labelled either White or Other Immigrant • Data source: Analysis of the 2001 Census Key Statistics by local authority Figure 4.8 Identity…labelling people and places

  46. Highest level of qualificationgained by people • The most unusually large group displayed here is shown when each area is compared with the UK average • Data source: Analysis of the 2001 Census Key Statistics by local authority Figure 4.9 Identity…labelling people and places

  47. Social classas defined largely by occupation • The most unusually large group displayed here is shown when each area is compared with the UK average • Data source: Analysis of the 2001 Census Key Statistics by local authority Figure 4.10 Identity…labelling people and places

  48. Key Point Summary • • Different areas of the UK can be typified as having particular groupings of people • • The elderly move towards the edges, people with qualifications tend to drift south • • The labelling of areas can both helpfully illuminate and harmfully stereotype Identity…labelling people and places

  49. Chapter 5 Politics…counting democracy, wasting votes

  50. Conservative and Liberal candidateselected as MPs in Britain, 2010 • Data source: Analysis of the 2010 general election results, proportion of Conservative and Liberal candidates per European constituency elected to a Westminster constituency Figure 5.1 Politics…counting democracy, wasting votes