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Compare the relative weight of art and nature in the works of four writers. PowerPoint Presentation
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Compare the relative weight of art and nature in the works of four writers.

Compare the relative weight of art and nature in the works of four writers.

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Compare the relative weight of art and nature in the works of four writers.

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  1. Compare the relative weight of art and nature in the works of four writers. George Herbert insists on nature over art in the “Jordan” poems (which are, ironically, crafted works of art). Philip Sidney insists on sincere feeling over convention in A.S. #1 (which is, ironically, a crafted sonnet). Ben Jonson praises Shakespeare for being the poet of both art and nature. Jonson’s own poetry is meticulously crafted, but it reads very naturally. John Donne’s ideas and style are clearly forced and artificial. Samuel Johnson thinks art is important but subordinate to nature. These poets placed different amounts of emphasis on art and nature.

  2. Compare the relative weight of art and nature in the works of four writers. George Herbert insists on nature over art in the “Jordan” poems (which are, ironically, crafted works of art). Philip Sidney insists on sincere feeling over convention in A.S. #1 (which is, ironically, a crafted sonnet). Ben Jonson praises Shakespeare for being the poet of both art and nature. Jonson’s own poetry is meticulously crafted, but it reads very naturally. John Donne’s ideas and style are clearly forced and artificial. Samuel Johnson thinks art is important but subordinate to nature. These poets placed different amounts of emphasis on art and nature. • Writers who especially privilege nature • John Dryden, but he “loves” Shakespeare (nature) and only “admires” Jonson (art). • Samuel Johnson, but he thinks that art is one good way to achieve natural writing. • Writers who especially privilege art • John Donne, disparaged by Johnson. • Writers who really privilege both • John Donne’s poetry seems more spontaneous than, say, Pope’s. • Shakespeare, whom Jonson praises for both art and nature. • Conclusion • The difficult of distinguishing the two.

  3. Compare the relative weight of art and nature in the works of four writers. George Herbert insists on nature over art in the “Jordan” poems (which are, ironically, crafted works of art). Philip Sidney insists on sincere feeling over convention in A.S. #1 (which is, ironically, a crafted sonnet). Ben Jonson praises Shakespeare for being the poet of both art and nature. Jonson’s own poetry is meticulously crafted, but it reads very naturally. John Donne’s ideas and style are clearly forced and artificial. Samuel Johnson thinks art is important but subordinate to nature. These poets placed different amounts of emphasis on art and nature. • Problem: poets who disparage art but do so in artificial verse forms. • E.g., Herbet, Sidney • Solution: art as a way to make literature more natural. • E.g., Samuel Johnson on the three unities • Complications of Johnson’s thoughts: • Art does not always result in natural poetry. • E.g., John Donne’s ideas and style are clearly forced and artificial. • Nature can be achieved without art. • E.g., Shakespeare (in opinion of Dryden and Johnson)