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PHOTOGRAPHY WARM and COOL Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

PHOTOGRAPHY WARM and COOL Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

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PHOTOGRAPHY WARM and COOL Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

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  1. PHOTOGRAPHY WARM and COOLPhotojournalism and Documentary Photography

  2. WARMPhotojournalism developed in Germany and France during the 1920s. The new small cameras such as the Leica made possible instant photography on the street. French photography was about people in their everyday life. Andre KerteszRobert DoisneauHenri Cartier-Bresson

  3. ANDRÉ KERTESZAndré Kertesz was a Hungarian photographer who worked in Hungary, France and the US.He helped develop the new genre of magazine photojournalism, creating warm, humorous images of everyday life.“I photographed real life—not the way it was, but the way I felt it. This is the most important thing: not analyzing, but feeling.“ André Kertesz, Circus in Budapest , 1920

  4. A street scene in Paris showing the famous Dubonnet posters by AM Cassandre. A study in hats Note the gender comment in the George/ Georgette sign linking the man and woman in the picture. André Kertesz, On the boulevard 1934

  5. Photographed in the studio of a sculptor. Hungarian dancer Magda Förstner playfully poses like the sculpture. André Kertesz, Satiric Dancer 1926

  6. Photographed in the studio of a sculptor. Hungarian dancer Magda Förstner playfully poses like the sculpture.$448,000 at Christies’ auction, 2008 André Kertesz, Satiric Dancer 1926

  7. Andre Kertesz, Mrs Blanche Montel at the wheel of her new BMC, 1928

  8. VU weekly picture magazine

  9. ROBERT DOISNEAURobert Doisneau was a French photographer who specialized in street life, always looking for humour and charm. The marvels of daily life are so exciting; no movie director can arrange the unexpected that you find in the street. Robert Doisneau, Rue du Docteur Lecène, Paris 1934

  10. Photographs about the act of looking

  11. Photographs about the act of looking

  12. Robert Doisneau, Square du Vert-Galant 1950

  13. HENRI CARTIER-BRESSONCartier-Bresson is the most famous photojournalist. He worked internationally for 50 years and helped set up the Magnum photo agency.His best photographs combine documentary content with precise timing and beautiful compositions.

  14. Henri Cartier-BressonBehind the Gare St Lazare, Paris, 1932 The Decisive Moment ‘The decisive moment is the simultaneous recognition, in a fraction of a second, of the significance of an event as well as the precise organization of forms which gives that event its proper expression.’

  15. Henri Cartier-BressonBehind the Gare St Lazare, Paris, 1932 The Decisive Moment ‘There is a creative fraction of a second when you are taking a picture. Your eye must see a composition or an expression that life itself offers you, and you must know with intuition when to click the camera. That is the moment the photographer is creative.’

  16. Henri Cartier-BressonBehind the Gare St Lazare, Paris, 1932 Closing the gap between the shoes and its reflection defeats the point of the photograph, which is the suspension of time.

  17. Henri Cartier-BressonBehind the Gare St Lazare, Paris, 1932

  18. Henri Cartier-BressonBehind the Gare St Lazare, Paris, 1932 Cartier-Bresson preferred to judge pictures by looking at them upside-down. “He always turned them all around and upside-down. It became like a sort of dance. Strangely, he didn’t want to look at the picture.” – René Burri

  19. Henri Cartier-Bresson, negative The actual negative from 1932

  20. Henri Cartier-Bresson, negative Inverted to show cropping of the negative

  21. Google Earth - where the photograph was taken

  22. Henri Cartier-Bresson,Sunday on the banks of the River Marne,1938

  23. Henri Cartier-Bresson, Russia 1955

  24. Henri Cartier-Bresson, Life Magazine cover, 1955 ‘Military appraisal at Russian trolley stop’

  25. Henri Cartier-Bresson, Simigne-la-Rotonde, 1969

  26. Henri Cartier-Bresson, Simigne-la-Rotonde, 1969

  27. Henri Cartier-Bresson, Simigne-la-Rotonde, 1969

  28. Henri Cartier-Bresson, Simigne-la-Rotonde, 1969

  29. Henri Cartier-Bresson, Simigne-la-Rotonde, 1969

  30. Henri Cartier-Bresson, Simigne-la-Rotonde, 1969

  31. COOLIn the 1950s and 60s a new approach to photographing the social landscape in America. It had an element of cynicism.These photographers had an offbeat approach to composition and subject.

  32. ROBERT FRANK The Americans, 1958 In 1955 Robert Frank was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to drive through the United States photographing the people places and objects that he encountered. Out of 28,000 35mm shots, he selected 83 for his book The Americans, which was published in 1958. The Americans French edition 1958. Cover design by Saul Steinberg

  33. Robert Frank, Swiss, unobtrusive, nice, with that little camera that he raises and snaps with one hand he sucked a sad poem right out of America onto film, taking rank among the tragic poets of the world. - Jack Kerouac, introduction to The Americans Robert Frank, Political rally, Chicago

  34. Robert Frank, Parade, Hoboken, New Jersey

  35. Robert Frank, Covered car, Long Beach, California

  36. Robert Frank, Sante Fe, New Mexico

  37. DIANE ARBUSIn Arbus’ photographs, transvestites, giants and dwarves are presented sympathetically and with dignity, while supposedly‘normal’ American citizens often appear eccentric or strange. She often used a flash, even in daylight, giving her images a theatrical edge. She placed her subjects in the centre of the square frame. - www.tate.org.uk Diane Arbus photographed by Garry Winogrand in Central Park, 1969

  38. There’s a quality of legend about freaks. Most people go through life dreading they’ll have a traumatic experience. Freaks were born with their trauma. They’ve already passed their test in life. They’re aristocrats. – Diane Arbus Diane Arbus, Woman with a veil on Fifth Ave, 1968

  39. Diane Arbus, Mexican dwarf in hotel room, 1970 Diane Arbus, Woman with a veil on Fifth Ave, 1968

  40. Diane Arbus, A naked man being a woman, 1968 Diane Arbus, Mexican dwarf in hotel room, 1970

  41. Diane Arbus, Child with a toy grenade in Central Park Diane Arbus, A naked man being a woman, 1968

  42. LEE FRIEDLANDERFriedlander makes cool, detached images of urban life. His compositions are among the most complex in all photography. Lee Friedlander, Self portrait, c1970

  43. Lee Friedlander, Albuquerque, New Mexico 1972

  44. Lee Friedlander, Knoxville, Tennessee, 1971

  45. Lee Friedlander, New York City, 1962

  46. William Eggleston,Memphis, Tennessee, c1971 WILLIAM EGGLESTON The New Colour Photography William Eggleston works with the most commonplace subjects, he photographs "democratically"--literally photographing the world around him. In the 1970s, he pioneered the use of colour film in the world of “art photography”.

  47. William Eggleston,Memphis, 1969-71 The people in Eggleston’s photographs could be characters in a Coen Brothers movie. The skinny, sharp-featured woman in the bouffant hairdo is a comical and vaguely alarming figure - New York Times

  48. William Eggleston, untitled, no date

  49. William Eggleston, untitled, no date

  50. William Eggleston, Georgia, 1978