Download
closing achievement gaps in california what a new generation of teachers needs to know n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Closing Achievement Gaps in California: What a New Generation of Teachers Needs to Know. PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Closing Achievement Gaps in California: What a New Generation of Teachers Needs to Know.

Closing Achievement Gaps in California: What a New Generation of Teachers Needs to Know.

163 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Closing Achievement Gaps in California: What a New Generation of Teachers Needs to Know.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Closing Achievement Gaps in California: What a New Generation of Teachers Needs to Know. Claremont Graduate University Teacher Education Program August 2006 Russlynn Ali, Director - The Education Trust-West

  2. Where Are We Now?US NAEP Long Term Trends

  3. Good News: Looking at National Long Term Trends, Achievement Gaps for Younger Hispanic and African American Students Are Narrowing at the Elementary Level.But We’re Losing Traction in Middle School.

  4. NAEP Reading, 9 Year-Olds:Record Performance for All Groups Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  5. African American-White Gap Narrows to Smallest Size in HistoryNAEP Reading, 9 Year-Olds 26 35 29 Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  6. Latino-White Gap Narrows to Smallest Size in HistoryNAEP Reading, 9 Year-Olds 21 28 24 Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  7. NAEP Math, 9 Year-Olds: Record Performance for All Groups Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  8. African American-White Gap Narrows to Smallest Size in HistoryNAEP Math, 9 Year-Olds 23 28 25 Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  9. Latino-White Gap Narrows to Smallest Size in HistoryNAEP Math, 9 Year-Olds 17 26 21 Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  10. 8th GradeNAEP Reading, 13 Year-Olds Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  11. But Gaps Getting Bigger in Middle School Latino-White Gap NAEP Reading, 13 Year-Olds 24 21 23 Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  12. African American-White Gap NAEP Reading, 13 Year-Olds 18 29 22 Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  13. NAEP Math, 13 Year-Olds Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  14. African American-White GapNAEP Math, 13 Year-Olds 26 32 25 Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  15. Latino-White Gap NAEP Math, 13 Year-Olds 23 24 20 Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  16. Progress Stops in High School.

  17. NAEP Reading, 17 Year-Olds 21 29 Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  18. NAEP Math, 17 Year-Olds 28 20 Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  19. African American and Latino 17 Year-Olds Do Math at Same Levels As White 13 Year-Olds Source:National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Long Term Trends

  20. African American and Latino 17 Year-Olds Read at Same Levels As White 13 Year-Olds Source:National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Long Term Trends

  21. A National Crisis: The Nation is Losing Standing in the Global Economy. Program for International Student Assessment

  22. Students in Other Countries Gain far More in Secondary School TIMSS

  23. PISA

  24. U.S. Ranking* Among OECD Countries has Remained the Same or Dropped between2000 and 2003 *Ranking out of 26 OECD Countries Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), PISA 2003 Results, data available at http://www.oecd.org/

  25. 2003: U.S. Ranked 24th out of 29 OECD Countries in Mathematics Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), PISA 2003 Results, data available at http://www.oecd.org/

  26. Problems are not limited to our high-poverty and high-minority schools . . .

  27. U.S. Ranks Low in the Percent of Students in the Highest Achievement Level (Level 6) in Math Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), PISA 2003 Results, data available at http://www.oecd.org/

  28. U.S. Ranks 23rd out of 29 OECD Countries in the Math Achievement of the Highest-Performing Students* * Students at the 95th Percentile Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), PISA 2003 Results, data available at http://www.oecd.org/

  29. U.S. Ranks 23rd out of 29OECD Countries in the Math Achievement of High-SES Students Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), PISA 2003 Results, data available at http://www.oecd.org/

  30. Our 15-year-olds have a worse average scale score in mathematics than most of their international peers. Closest Competitor? Latvia. Source: OECD Problem Solving for Tomorrow’s World. 2004

  31. Problems not limited to math, either.

  32. PISA 2003: Problem-Solving, US Ranks 24th Out of 29 OECD Countries Source: NCES, 2005, International Outcomes of Learning in Mathematics, Literacy and Problem Solving: 2003 PISA Results. NCES 2005-003

  33. More than half of our 15 year olds at problem-solving level 1 or below. Source: OECD Problem Solving for Tomorrow’s World. 2004

  34. More than half of our 15 year olds at problem-solving level 1 or below. Just ahead of us? Russia and Latvia Source: OECD Problem Solving for Tomorrow’s World. 2004

  35. One measure on which we rank high?Inequality!

  36. PISA 5th-95th Gap Rank* Mathematical Literacy 8 Performance Of U.S. 15 Year-Olds Highly Variable Problem Solving 6 Reading 8 *Of 29 OECD countries Source: OECD, Learning for Tomorrow’s World: First Results From PISA 2003.

  37. How Does California Compare?2005 National Assessment of Educational Progress

  38. California Ranks Low Compared to Other States on NAEP – 4th Grade Reading Source: NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress, 2005

  39. California’s Ranking on NAEP – 8th Grade Reading Source: NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress, 2005

  40. Even when statistical significance is taken into account, almost every other state does better than California in 8th grade reading Source: NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress, 2005

  41. And Our Achievement Gaps Are Larger Than Many Other States Source: NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress, 2005

  42. Are California’s low achievement levels due to our demographics?

  43. CA’s White Students Are Scoring Below White Students in Many Other States. Source: NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress, 2005

  44. California’s Non Low-Income Students Do Better Than Non Low-Income Students in Only Three Other States. Source: NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress, 2005

  45. On Our Own Assessments?

  46. ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS CST All Students 2006

  47. MATH CSTAll Students 2006 *General Math – Tests Grades 6 & 7 Standards Source: California Department of Education, 2005

  48. ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS4th Grade, By EthnicityCST 2006

  49. ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS4th Grade, By Economic StatusCST 2006

  50. MATH4th Grade, By EthnicityCST 2006