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Lessons from Schools on the Performance Frontier

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  1. IMPROVING ACHIEVEMENT AND CLOSING GAPS BETWEEN GROUPS Lessons from Schools on the Performance Frontier Montana Assessment Conference Helena, 2007

  2. First, some good news. After more than a decade of fairly flat achievement and stagnant or growing gaps, we appear to be turning the corner.

  3. NAEP Reading, 9 Year-Olds:Record Performance for All Groups Note: Long-Term Trends NAEP Source:National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress

  4. African American-White Gap Narrows to Smallest Size in HistoryNAEP Reading, 9 Year-Olds 26 35 29 Note: Long-Term Trends NAEP Source:National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress

  5. Latino-White Gap Narrows to Smallest Size in HistoryNAEP Reading, 9 Year-Olds 21 28 24 Note: Long-Term Trends NAEP Source:National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress

  6. NAEP Math, 9 Year-Olds: Record Performance for All Groups Note: Long-Term Trends NAEP Source:National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress

  7. African American-White Gap Narrows to Smallest Size in HistoryNAEP Math, 9 Year-Olds 23 28 25 Note: Long-Term Trends NAEP Source:National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress

  8. Latino-White Gap Narrows to Smallest Size in HistoryNAEP Math, 9 Year-Olds 17 26 21 Note: Long-Term Trends NAEP Source:National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress

  9. Bottom Line:When We Really Focus on Something, We Make Progress

  10. Clearly, much more remains to be done in elementary and middle school Too many youngsters still enter high school way behind.

  11. 2005 NAEP Grade 8 ReadingAll Students, Nation Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  12. 2005 NAEP Grade 8 Readingby Race/Ethnicity, Nation Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  13. 2005 NAEP Grade 8 Readingby Family Income, Nation Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  14. 2005 NAEP Grade 8 MathAll Students, Nation Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  15. 2005 NAEP Grade 8 Mathby Race/Ethnicity, Nation Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  16. 2005 NAEP Grade 8 Mathby Family Income, Nation Source: National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/

  17. But the bigger problem is that we’re not really building on these successes in the upper grades.

  18. Achievement Flat in Reading 13 Year-Olds, NAEP Source: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress (p. 107) Washington, DC: US Department of Education, August 2000

  19. Achievement Flat or Declining in Reading, 17 year olds, NAEP Note: Long-Term Trends NAEP Source: NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress.

  20. Math? At first blush, appears to be trending upwards.

  21. Achievement Up in Math, 13 Year-Olds, NAEP Source: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress (p. 108) Washington, DC: US Department of Education, August 2000

  22. Achievement up in Math,17 year olds, NAEP Note: Long-Term Trends NAEP Source: NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress and NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress.

  23. But Value Added in Middle and High School Math Actually Declined During the Nineties

  24. Value Added Declining in Middle School Math... Age 9-13 Growth Source: NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress

  25. Value Added Declining in High School Math... Scale Score Growth, From Age 13 to Age 17 Note: Scale score gains reflect the difference between the scale scores of 17-year-olds and the scale scores of 13-year-olds four years prior. Source: NCES, 1999. Trends in Academic Progress. Data from Long Term Trend NAEP

  26. ... Still Scale Score Growth, From Grade 8 to Grade 12 Note: Scale score gains reflect the difference between the scale scores of 12th Graders and the scale scores of 8th Graders four years prior. Source: NAEP Data Explorer, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde

  27. Gaps between groups wider today than in 1990

  28. NAEP Reading, 17 Year-Olds 21 29 Note: Long-Term Trends NAEP Source:National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress

  29. NAEP Math, 17 Year-Olds 28 20 Note: Long-Term Trends NAEP Source:National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress

  30. Hormones?

  31. If so, we’d see the same pattern in other countries. And we don’t.

  32. Looking across the Grades?2003 TIMSS and PISA Math (US only compared with countries that participated in all three assessments TIMSS 4+8 and PISA)

  33. 2003TIMSS Grade 4 Math Source: American Institutes For Research, November 2005, Reassessing U.S. Mathematics Performance: New Findings from the 2003 TIMSS and PISA

  34. 2003TIMSS Grade 8 Math Source: American Institutes For Research, November 2005, Reassessing U.S. Mathematics Performance: New Findings from the 2003 TIMSS and PISA

  35. PISA 2003Mathematics, 15-Year-Olds Source: American Institutes For Research, November 2005, Reassessing U.S. Mathematics Performance: New Findings from the 2003 TIMSS and PISA

  36. Let’s take a closer look at our 15 year olds.

  37. A few years ago, we got a wake up call when the 1999 PISA results were published.

  38. US 15 Year-Olds Rank Near Middle Of The Pack Among 32 Participating Countries: 1999

  39. The new ones?

  40. PISA 2003:US 15 Year-Olds Rank Near The End Of The Pack Among 29 OECD Countries Source: NCES, 2005, International Outcomes of Learning in Mathematics, Literacy and Problem Solving: 2003 PISA Results. NCES 2005-003

  41. A closer look at math?

  42. 2003: U.S. Ranked 24th out of 29 OECD Countries in Mathematics Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), PISA 2003 Results, data available at http://www.oecd.org/

  43. Problems are not limited to our high-poverty and high-minority schools . . .

  44. U.S. Ranks Low in the Percent of Students in the Highest Achievement Level (Level 6) in Math Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), PISA 2003 Results, data available at http://www.oecd.org/

  45. U.S. Ranks 23rd out of 29 OECD Countries in the Math Achievement of the Highest-Performing Students* * Students at the 95th Percentile Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), PISA 2003 Results, data available at http://www.oecd.org/

  46. U.S. Ranks 23rd out of 29OECD Countries in the Math Achievement of High-SES Students Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), PISA 2003 Results, data available at http://www.oecd.org/

  47. Problems not limited to math, either.

  48. PISA 2003: Problem-Solving, US Ranks 24th Out of 29 OECD Countries Source: NCES, 2005, International Outcomes of Learning in Mathematics, Literacy and Problem Solving: 2003 PISA Results. NCES 2005-003

  49. More than half of our 15 year olds at problem-solving level 1 or below. Source: OECD Problem Solving for Tomorrow’s World. 2004

  50. One measure on which we rank high?Inequality!