Download
interviewing graduate school and beyond n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Interviewing: Graduate School and Beyond PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Interviewing: Graduate School and Beyond

Interviewing: Graduate School and Beyond

2 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Interviewing: Graduate School and Beyond

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Interviewing:Graduate School and Beyond Created by Susan D. Croll, PhD Presented by Richard J. Bodnar, Ph.D. Psi Chi Talk, February 15, 2006

  2. Interviewing Contexts • Graduate Study • Jobs • Awards

  3. Preparing for an Interview in Advance • Learn as much as possible about the place you’re visiting • Be prepared to ask questions about the environment • Be prepared to answer questions about yourself

  4. Information to Gather: Program • What is the orientation of the program? • Clinical: psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive? • Basic: empirical, theoretical, theory-driven in what way? • What are the program requirements? • What is required of the students outside of coursework?

  5. Information to Gather: Faculty • Who are the research-active faculty? • Literature: look for recent articles • Contact faculty members to ask about their research and lab (e-mail best). • Try to arrange visits with faculty of interest during interview.

  6. Preparing for an Interview in Advance • Learn as much as possible about the place you’re visiting • Be prepared to ask questions about the environment • Be prepared to answer questions about yourself

  7. Good questions for you to ask • Questions that show you are eager, scholarly, and informed.

  8. Good questions for you to askExamples • Will I get an opportunity to learn things about other labs? • Is there an opportunity to interact with alumni or more advanced graduate students for peer mentoring? • What is the average time of completion of the degree? • How soon can I start working on my research? • How are your library facilities/journals, etc. • What are your research facilities like? • If relevant: What sorts of internships or clinical experiences will be available to me?

  9. Bad questions for you to ask • Questions that make you sound uninformed, greedy, lazy, or unsure of goals.

  10. Bad questions for you to ask:Examples • How much money will I get as a stipend (eventually, but not right up front)? • How much money should I expect to make in my first year out of the program? • How many hours per week of research do I have to do? • Could you explain to me what I/O psychology (or whichever…) is really all about? • What are the program requirements?

  11. To avoid bad questions • DO YOUR HOMEWORK BEFORE APPLYING • Read every word written on the program’s website before going to the interview • Conduct a search on every member of the graduate faculty (PubMed or PsychInfo) and choose 2-3 that really interest you • Carefully research your options for fields to pick from – if unsure, delay graduate application – work in the field for awhile

  12. Preparing for an Interview in Advance • Learn as much as possible about the place you’re visiting • Be prepared to ask questions about the environment • Be prepared to answer questions about yourself

  13. Common questions encountered Why are you interested in this program/place? What do you have to offer this program/place? What are your strengths and weaknesses? Tell us about your research. What are your short-term and long-term goals?

  14. Common questions encountered Why are you interested in this program/place? • Understand why you have chosen the field of study you have applied for • Understand the strengths of the particular program you have applied for • Be ready to talk about a few faculty members with interesting research (esp. PhD)

  15. Common questions encountered What do you have to offer this program/place? • What are your special skills (computers, people skills, etc.)? • How would these skills be of benefit in this environment? • Why are you interested in this field?

  16. Common questions encountered What are your strengths and weaknesses? • What are your personal and academic strengths? (don’t brag, just be prepared to say you “think” you…..) • What are your weaknesses? • This is a common question – really think about your weaknesses • Select a few weaknesses that can either: • Be also viewed as a strength (workaholic, etc.) or • That you have shown progress in overcoming (eg. shyness). • Do not talk about inherent, serious personality defects that are hard to overcome (depressive, etc.).

  17. Common questions encountered Tell us about your research. Few PhD programs will select students without research experience. MA, MS, PsyD, MD, JD are more likely to do so (though it’s a plus for all graduate training). Be prepared to: • Describe your research • Show that you understood the goals of your research • Be able to discuss your research within a larger context (what it means to theories or to the world at large)

  18. Common questions encountered What are your short-term and long-term goals? • Pick some short-term goals for yourself • research goals • academic goals • experiential goals (clinical, etc.) • Have a sense for where you see yourself in your professional career (okay to say you haven’t selected a particular specialization, so long as its WITHIN the field of study – have a few thoughts, though)

  19. Days to Weeks Before: • Make sure that you select a suit or other professional outfit, UNLESS TOLD OTHERWISE (honor requests) • Make sure that you have made several copies of your CV/resume and/or manuscripts, even if you sent them in advance • Prepare your list of questions • Be sure that you know where you’re going – it’s not good to be late!

  20. That morning: • Wear your professional clothing • Pack copies of your CV and manuscripts/abstracts/honors • Pack your list of questions • Be tidy, well-groomed, and well-rested

  21. At your interview • Don’t be demanding – it’s ok to accept offers of coffee, water, etc.; but don’t ask unless offered • Greet each new person with a warm smile and out-stretched hand • Shake with a short, firm handshake

  22. What they’re looking for • Clinical or Business Programs (especially) • Good social skills • Appropriate, professional demeanor • Good carriage under duress (calm, confident) • Basic Programs (especially) • Dedication to research • Scholarly skills, orientation • All Programs • Intelligence • Communication skills • Understanding of program and field

  23. Be sure to show your best self Be friendly, forthcoming, honest, and enjoy the interview

  24. At the End of Interview • Always smile, shake hands, and thank host • Leave your contact information • Express enthusiasm about what you saw/learned/heard

  25. After the interview • Follow-up letter is nice, not essential (express interest, gratitude, and give contact information). • After awhile, one follow-up call is acceptable – don’t harass • E-mail if you have further questions – this is less intrusive than calling