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Idaho Public Driver Education PowerPoint Presentation
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Idaho Public Driver Education

Idaho Public Driver Education

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Idaho Public Driver Education

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  1. Idaho Public Driver Education Sharing the Road

  2. Idaho law requires motorists to operate their vehicles in a careful and prudent manner without endangering the life, limb, property or other rights of people entitled to use the highways A driver’s view to the front and sides of the vehicle cannot be blocked by anything loaded in or on the vehicle Introduction

  3. Drivers must be aware of who is sharing the road with them the amount of traffic the type of traffic (trucks, motorcyclists, buses, animals, etc.) Introduction, continued… Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  4. In Idaho, pedestrian crashes account for 12% percent of all fatal crashes Pedestrian safety is a serious issue In any collision, the pedestrian loses, regardless of who had the right of way Photos courtesy of the AAA Foundation PEDESTRIANS

  5. Crossing at an intersection or crosswalk Crossing, walking, or standing in the road Working on, or pushing a vehicle in the road Playing or darting into the road PEDESTRIANS Risky Behavior

  6. Left-turning vehicles are more often involved in pedestrian accidents than right-turning vehicles, partly because drivers do not search thoroughly, and are not able to see pedestrians to the left. PEDESTRIANS In this traffic scene, who has the right of way? Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  7. Know when pedestrians have the right of way Expect pedestrians anytime, anywhere Know that pedestrians can be very hard to see, especially in bad weather or at night Good Habits for Sharing the Road with Pedestrians Stop for pedestrians crossing the street, even if they are not in a marked crosswalk

  8. Stop well back so that drivers in the other lanes can also see the pedestrian in time to stop Be aware that cars stopped in the street may be stopped to allow a pedestrian to cross, do not pass if there is any doubt more Good Habits for Sharing the Road with Pedestrians

  9. Pedestrians may not look for or see traffic Expect unpredictable actions When watching for a “gap” in traffic to make a turn, a pedestrian may have moved into the intended path of travel In locations where children are active—expect children to dart into the street at any time even more Good Habits for Sharing the Road with Pedestrians

  10. Stop for anyone crossing the street on foot Watch for walkers, joggers, and runners Avoid using the horn Watch for seniors or people in wheelchairs at intersections Stop for a pedestrian with a white cane or guide dog still more Good Habits for Sharing the Road with Pedestrians

  11. We are all pedestrians and as pedestrians, we have a responsibility to use the streets safely Be predictable Use sidewalks where provided, where no sidewalks are provided, it is usually safer to walk facing road traffic Make it easy for drivers to see pedestrians Expect that drivers will not be watching for pedestrians Good Habits as a Pedestrian Is this pedestrian using good habits while crossing the street?

  12. Two-and three-wheeled modes of transportation are more difficult to see in the traffic mix Like car drivers, these users have certain rights and always have the same responsibility for operating their choice of transportation with care and safety Sharing the Road With Two and Three-Wheeled Riders Photo courtesy of the NYS Department of Motor Vehicles Governor's Traffic Safety Committee and the New York Bicycling Coalition

  13. Bicycles are operated by riders of all ages who are responsible for knowing the rules of the road Sharing the Road with Bicyclists Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  14. Many riders are young and may not know or understand the rules of the road Children will ride their bicycles on sidewalks and in the road Sharing the Road with Bicyclists

  15. Bicycles can be used for recreation or as a mode of transportation to school or work Many jurisdictions have bicycle lanes for the exclusive use of bicyclists Even though required by law, bicycles may not have a headlight or reflectors, seeing them at night can be difficult Sharing the Road with Bicyclists Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  16. On most roadways, bicyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as other roadway users Drivers must yield the right of way to a bicyclist just as they would to another vehicle Bicyclists are required to travel in the same direction as vehicles Sharing the Road with Bicyclists Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  17. Just as the wind produced by a passing tractor-trailer can pull a car off course, so too can a passing vehicle cause a cyclist to swerve out of control When following bicyclists, give them plenty of room and be prepared to stop quickly Sharing the Road with Bicyclists This vehicle is illegally parked in a marked bicycle lane Photos courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  18. After parking and before opening vehicle doors, first check for bicyclists Sharing the Road with Bicyclists

  19. Experienced bicyclists can ride 20-25 mph and may be closer than you think Sharing the Road with Bicyclists Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  20. Sharing the Road with Bicyclists When passing a bicycle rider leave at least three feet of passing space Graphic courtesy of the NYS Department of Motor Vehicles Governor's Traffic Safety Committee New York Bicycling Coalition

  21. Sharing the Road with Bicyclists When turning left and a bicyclist is entering the intersection from the opposite direction, wait for the bicyclist to pass before making the turn Graphic courtesy of the NYS Department of Motor Vehicles Governor's Traffic Safety Committee New York Bicycling Coalition

  22. Bicyclists Responsibilities Predict the possible hazards that these irresponsible young bicyclists may not see

  23. Idaho Bicycle Laws In Idaho a bicyclist does not need to come to a complete stop at stop signs. They must, however, yield the right of way to vehicles in or already at the intersection, then proceed with caution. Bicyclists may also proceed through a red light after stopping and yielding the right of way to vehicles already in the intersection.

  24. Mopeds are classified as a vehicle that has both a motor and pedals. Mopeds have either a gasoline engine under 50cc or an electric engine that does not exceed 30 mph. Sharing the Road with Mopeds Moped riders have the same rights and responsibilities as other roadway users

  25. Idaho requires a driver’s license but NOT a motorcycle endorsement to operate a moped. They are typically restricted from high-speed roadways Use the same good sharing the road driving habits when sharing the road with mopeds Sharing the Road with Mopeds

  26. Scooters are no longer just small 50cc engine vehicles with a top speed of 25 mph Scooters today can have 600cc engines with a top speed of over 100 mph and can cost over $8,000 Scooters with a 200cc engine can reach 60 mph The tires are smaller than a motorcycle’s They typically weigh less than a motorcycle Scooters are fuel-efficient—getting up to 100 mpg Sharing the Road with Scooters Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  27. With their step through style, scooters are considered easier to ride than a motorcycle. People of all ages ride scooters—from teenagers to grandparents. Many do not get rider training and may not know how to handle these machines safely. Use reduced-risk driving behaviors around these two-wheeled vehicles Sharing the Road with Scooters Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation Should scooter riders be required to wear a helmet? Scooters larger than 50cc are technically a motorcycle.

  28. When motorcycles and other vehicles collide it is not always the rider’s fault; drivers often violate the riders right of way or don’t see the small machines before it’s too late. Almost half of fatal motorcycle crashes involve an impaired rider. Half of all motorcycle crashes are single-vehicle crashes. 68% of Idaho riders killed in a crash are 40 years old or older. Sharing the Road with Motorcycles Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  29. The visual problem is compounded by a variety of visual limitations confronting drivers. Automobiles have obstructions and blind spots that can obscure or hide a motorcycle and rider—such as door pillars, passengers’ heads, and areas not visible in the mirrors. Sharing the Road with Motorcycles A vehicle corner post can hide a car, motorcyclist or a pedestrian

  30. Remember how large blind spots are? Blind Spots Cars and trucks can be almost “invisible” to a driver – so motorcycles may bethere but not be seen in any of your mirrors!

  31. Other conditions affecting the vehicle—such as precipitation, glare, and cargo—can further impair a driver’s view and obscure motorcyclists. Objects and environmental factors beyond the vehicle, including other vehicles, roadside objects, and light patterns can make it more difficult for drivers to identify motorcyclists in traffic. Sharing the Road with Motorcycles Photo courtesy of “People’s Daily Online. What should a motorcyclist do in heavy rain?

  32. Distractions such as passengers, eating, smoking, reading, shaving, applying make-up, and managing audio systems, continue to be a problem and new distractions are being introduced all the time. A minor distraction in the car can be deadly to a motorcyclist you are sharing the road with. Sharing the Road with Motorcycles Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  33. Making a left turn A motorcyclist is riding in other drivers’ blind spots There are hazardous road conditions such as potholes, wet leaves, railroad tracks, painted lines when wet Other obstructions may force a motorcyclist to take an unexpected action Sport utility vehicles, delivery vans, and large trucks have an obstructed line of sight that blocks motorcyclists from the driver’s view Drivers are more likely to be involved in an collision with a motorcycle when: Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation Should motorcyclist be required to wear bright gear?

  34. Drivers can improve safety by understanding the conditions that can affect where and how motorcyclists ride. Motorcycles may be forced from their position on the road by strong winds or a rough road surface. Turn signals are not self-canceling on most motorcycles and the rider may forget to cancel them. Weather can cause the surface to have less traction and the rider may need to ride in different lane positions to gain best traction. Understanding Motorcyclists’ Unique Challenges Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  35. Passengers can distract the rider. If the rider is not wearing warm protective gear during colder temperatures, the rider can be affected by hypothermia and be less aware of surroundings. If the rider does not have a helmet, the eyes can be affected by wind and debris. Watch for clues, such as operators or passengers turning their heads to look. Understanding Motorcyclists’ Unique Challenges Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  36. Expect the unexpected Skateboards, Rollerblades, etc. A fun way to get around, but unpredictable for drivers. As a driver, keep an eye out and protect them.

  37. Vehicles of different sizes and power handle differently Large trucks and recreational vehicles require lots of power to accelerate to highway speeds and require longer stopping distance The size and weight of trucks and other large vehicles limit their maneuverability and create large blind spots for their drivers Sharing the Road with Trucks

  38. Drivers must be aware of these differences and how to share the road with trucks, buses, recreational vehicles and other large vehicles Large vehicles create air turbulence To minimize turbulence impact stay in lane position three and hold the steering wheel firmly Be prepared to make steering corrections Sharing the Road with Trucks Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  39. Generally speaking, the bigger the vehicles are: The bigger their blind spots The more room they need to maneuver The longer it takes them to stop The longer it takes to pass them The more likely you're going to be the loser in a collision Sharing the Road with Trucks

  40. Drivers are at a serious disadvantage if involved in a crash with a larger vehicle Studies have shown that the passenger car driver is at fault in 70 percent of the fatal crashes involving passenger cars and large trucks  Sharing the Road with Trucks Source: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCAA)

  41. Of all two-vehicle crashes between large trucks and passenger vehicles, 35 percent occur in the blind spots that exist on all four sides of commercial vehicle These blind spots are known as the "No Zone" From 1992 through 2001, more than 50,000 people were killed in crashes involving large commercial trucks, approximately 40,000 were passengers in other vehicles In collisions between passenger vehicles and large commercial trucks, the occupants of passenger vehicles are 15 times more likely to be killed than truck occupants In 2010 there were 158 large truck single trailer crashes in Idaho and 8 fatalities. Sharing the Road with Trucks Source: Idaho Department of Transportation Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  42. Know and use safe driving strategies when sharing the road with large commercial vehicles Large trucks have much greater stopping distance than passenger vehicles Trucks need nearly twice the time and room to stop as cars do Most fully-loaded 18 wheelers weigh as much as 80,000 pounds 80,000 pounds 55 mph 50 yards Sharing the Road with Trucks At 55 mph this truck would need the length of a football field to stop

  43. More than 60 percent of fatal truck crashes involve impacts with the front of a truck Safe driving strategy:  Wait until you can see the whole front of the truck in your rearview mirror before pulling in front of it, never, ever cut in quickly in front of a truck Sharing the Road with Trucks

  44. Once in front of a truck, do not slow down Backing up - When a truck is backing up, it sometimes must temporarily block the street to maneuver its trailer accurately Never pass close behind a truck that is preparing to back up or is in the process of backing up Remember, most trailers are eight-feet wide and can completely hide objects that suddenly come between the truck and a loading area Sharing the Road with Trucks

  45. Large trucks have large blind spots in front of, behind, and on both sides of the vehicle--the larger the truck, the larger the blind spots--a car virtually disappears from the view of the driver Most drivers may not realize that large commercial trucks do not have an inside rearview mirror Truck drivers rely solely on their side view mirrors which cause the large blind spots on both sides of the vehicle—nighttime adds to the visibility problem No Zone 3rd largest blind spot No Zone No Zone Right side has the largest blind spot No Zone Trucks NO-ZONES

  46. Never underestimate the size and speed of an approaching tractor-trailer A large tractor-trailer often appears to be traveling at a slower speed because of its large size Many car versus large truck collisions take place at intersections because the car driver did not realize how close the truck was or how quickly it was traveling Sharing the Road with Trucks

  47. Bus lanes are intended to save time for bus riders by enabling them to bypass the areas of heaviest traffic congestion such as a business district. Bus lanes are identified by the HOV diamond and usually the words “Bus Only”. Use of the bus lane is restricted to buses only! Bus Lanes

  48. Construction vehicles are typically very large, and when loaded, very heavy. Acceleration and braking takes more time. The heavy vehicle will have a longer stopping distance. The blind areas around the vehicle can be large and restrictive. Construction workers may be busy using the heavy vehicle for construction, and may not be able to give traffic 100% of his attention. Use reduced risk driving skills when sharing the roadway with construction vehicles. Construction Vehicles Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  49. Recreational motor homes can be 40 feet long, not including a tow vehicle! It may also be pulling a boat or trailer. Visibility is a major problem—this vehicle can block the following driver’s line-of-sight—increase following distance to improve line-of-sight Recreational Vehicles Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  50. School Busses With two or more lanes going both directions, opposing traffic does not have to stop Traffic behind the bus always has to stop