Download
introduction to bizagi n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Introduction to BizAgi PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Introduction to BizAgi

Introduction to BizAgi

833 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Introduction to BizAgi

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Introduction to BizAgi

  2. User Interface (Summary) • The user interface for BizAgi resembles Office • It uses a similar ribbon • The Palette contains the various symbols (Flow, Artifacts, Swimlanes, Connections) • Draw these on the visual palette • The Elementproperties section allows you to configure the selected element

  3. User Interface (Illustration)

  4. Creating a New Model • Click File, New to create a new BizAgi model • The design surface shows a process with a single pool • Use the Basic properties to give the process a name • Drag the Laneicon to the design surface to create a swim lane • Use the element properties to name each swim lane

  5. Creating the Model • Use the Palette to drag symbols to the diagram

  6. Events • Fire as a result of something happening • A message is received • A period of time elapses • An exceptional conditional arises • We typically perform an action in response to an event

  7. Events • Fire as a result of something happening • A message is received • A period of time elapses • An exceptional conditional arises • We typically perform an action in response to an event

  8. Event Types • Message – Arrives from a participant • Timer – Process starts at a period in time • Rule (conditional)– Triggers when a rule becomes true

  9. Event Types (2) • Link – Connect the end event of one process to the start of another process • Multiple – Multiple ways of triggering the process • Exception – An error • End events

  10. Message Events • Messages are typically sent by one participant and received by another • Send sales order information that is received by accounting to check credit • The event can be thrown or caught • Sending a message means throwing a message • Receiving a message means catching a message • See MessageThrowCatch in EventSamples

  11. Message Throw Catch Example

  12. Timer Events • The event fires a specific time or cycle • Only applicable to start or intermediate events • In BizAgi, use the Element properties to set the timer to a date or cycle • Examples • Time delay to approve credit • Wait for payment date • Start payroll process every two weeks • See Timer in EventSamples

  13. Conditional Events • Events that fire when an external condition becomes true or false • Process A/P checks on Mondays • We could also implement this as a timer • Inventory below threshold – generate order request • Only applicable to start or intermediate events • See Conditional in EventSamples

  14. To Create an Event • First, drag the event icon to the designer surface • Right-click on the event and set the event type

  15. Gateways 1 • Gateways are used to depict decisions or merges • Types • Exclusive (XOR) • Only one output (alternative) flow is allowed • Gateways diverge or converge • Inclusive (OR) • A default output flow must be specified • Parallel for / join (AND)

  16. Gateways (2) • Event-based gateways • These are (Exclusive) gateways that rely on external messages

  17. Gateway – XOR Example • Exclusive XOR Decision • See ExclusiveGatewayin EventSamples

  18. Gateway - OR • Inclusive OR decision

  19. Gateway – Example 3 • Parallel Forking – All sequence flows drawn out of the gateway are taken

  20. Processes and Tasks • A process is a network of steps • A process can be marked as having a sub-process • To mark an activity has having a sub process, right-click the activity and click Transform to subprocess

  21. Sub Processes – Illustration (1)

  22. Data Objects • First, we are not talking about a database or physical data • We are talking about information about a process • Data objects are attached to a sequence or message flow with a dashed line

  23. Data Objects (Illustration)

  24. Text Annotation • Contains descriptive text about a process • A line connects the annotation to the activity

  25. Workflow Patterns (Introduction) • In this second section of the lecture, we talk about simple and complex workflow patterns • Much of this is derived from the AIFB paper (Modeling Workflow Patterns) in this lecture

  26. Sequence Pattern • Tasks are executed in sequence (one after another)

  27. Parallel Split • This is a logical AND gateway • The parallel branches are executed concurrently

  28. Parallel Split (Example)

  29. Synchronization • Two or more different branches get merged into a single branch • All merged branches must be completed before the process can continue (Implied) • Synchronization can occur because of a parallel split

  30. Synchronization (Illustration)

  31. Exclusive Choice • Here, we are making a decision with mutually exclusive outcomes • (Only one outcome is possible)

  32. Exclusive Choice (Example)

  33. Simple Merge • A point in a process where two or more branches are merged into a single branch • The initial branches are created via some type of choice

  34. Simple Merge (Example)