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A High-Speed Sliding-Mode Observer for the Sensorless Speed Control of a PMSM

A High-Speed Sliding-Mode Observer for the Sensorless Speed Control of a PMSM

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A High-Speed Sliding-Mode Observer for the Sensorless Speed Control of a PMSM

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  1. A High-Speed Sliding-Mode Observer for theSensorless Speed Control of a PMSM Student: Tai-Rong Lai Professor: Ming-Shyan Wang BY Hongryel Kim, Jubum Son, and Jangmyung LeeIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 58, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2011 4069-4077

  2. Outline • Abstract • Introduction • Conventional SMO • High-Speed SMO • Experimental Results • Back EMF Detection • Conclusion • References 2 Robot and Servo Drive Lab.

  3. A sensorless speed control strategy for a permanent-magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) based on a new sliding-mode observer (SMO), which substitutes a sigmoid function for the signum function with a variable boundary layer. The stability of the proposed SMO was verified using the Lyapunov second method to determine the observer gain. The validity of the proposed high-speed PMSM sensorless velocity control has been demonstrated with simulations and real experiments. Abstract

  4. Since a PMSM receives a sinusoidal magnetic flux from the PM of the rotor, precise position data are necessary for an efficient vector control. Generally, the rotor position can be detected by a resolver or by an absolute encoder. However, these sensors are expensive and very sensitive to environmental constraints such as vibration and temperature [2]. To overcome these problems, instead of using position sensors, a sensorless control method has been developed for control of the motor using the estimated values of the position and velocity of the rotor . Introduction

  5. A. PMSM Modeling B. Conventional SMO Conventional SMO

  6. PMSM Modeling • The PMSM consists of a rotor with a PM and a stator with a three-phase Y-connected winding, which is located at every 120◦ on the circle. The three-phase motor is an intrinsically nonlinear time-varying system.

  7. Conventional SMO

  8. A. Sigmoid Function B. Stability Analysis High-Speed SMO

  9. This new SMO is composed by the PMSM current equation in the rest frame of (1) as follows: Sigmoid Function

  10. The new SMO resolves the problems of the conventional SMO by using a sigmoid function as the switching function. The sigmoid function is represented as Sigmoid Function

  11. The sliding surface sn can be defined as functions of the errors between the actual current, i.e., iα and iβ, and the estimated current, i.e.,ˆiα andˆiβ, for each phase as follows: Stability Analysis

  12. Stability Analysis

  13. Sensorless speed controller for the 1-kW PMSM

  14. Experimental Results

  15. Responses of the observer using signum and sigmoid functions

  16. Sensorless speed control using the signum function at 2000 r/min

  17. Sensorless speed control using the signum function at 2000 r/min

  18. Proposed sensorless speed control at 2000 r/min

  19. Proposed sensorless speed control at 2000 r/min

  20. Experimental data with the inertia load JL = 22.3 kg · cm2

  21. Velocity tracking with the stator-resistance change

  22. The chattering problem in the conventional slidingmode control was resolved by using a sigmoid function with a variable boundary layer as the switching function instead of the conventional signum function. A stator-resistance estimator was employed to reduce the estimated error associated with parameter fluctuations. The proposed control system has a fast response achieved by reduction of the integral operations needed for the LPF of the conventional adaptive SMO. The superiority of the algorithm has been confirmed through simulations and experiments. In our future research, we will explore the reduction of both overshoot and speed error by the adjustment of gains based on heuristic methods. Conclusion

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  25. Thanks for your listening ! 25 Robot and Servo Drive Lab.