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Diversity Awareness Workshop Template

Diversity Awareness Workshop Template

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Diversity Awareness Workshop Template

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  1. Diversity Awareness Workshop Template

  2. Acknowledgements This diversity awareness workshop was developed by IBEC with funding received from the Office of the Minister for Integration and the Equality Authority.

  3. DisclaimerThe Diversity Awareness Workshop is for information purposes only and IBEC assumes no responsibility for any use to which the information may be put, or for any errors, typographical or otherwise. This workshop is not a substitute for specialist employment law or legal advice, where appropriate. Member companies are invited to consult IBEC in this regard.IBEC 2012

  4. Outline of the diversity awareness workshop Unconscious bias The effects of unconscious bias in the workplace The organisation unconscious Solutions to unconscious bias • What is diversity? • The equality legislation • Why do we need to be diversity aware? • The equality – diversity continuum

  5. So what does diversity mean to you?

  6. What is diversity

  7. Definition of Diversity Management Creation and maintenance of an environment where differences, both visible and non-visible, are valued and respected in order to maximise an individual’s contribution to the business strategy

  8. Why do we need to be diversity aware? • Drivers: • Demographic trends • Business environment • Legal Impetus • Potential benefits of adopting a Diversity Management Strategy

  9. Why do we need to be diversity aware? Demographic trends • Every workforce is diverse

  10. The Diverse Irish Workforce Who are we? • 12% of non-Irish origin • 10% with some form of disability • 44% of the workforce is female • Our workforce is ageing and birth rate falling • 57% of the workforce are over 35, 32% over 45 • 19% of employment in Ireland is part-time, 20% of workers do ‘shift’ work • 4 generations working together in our workplaces Source: CSO, Quarterly National Household Survey, Census

  11. Why do we need to be diversity aware? Demographic trends • Every workforce is diverse • Demands of a changing workforce profile Business environment • Utilising all our people yields competitive advantage • Failure to integrate skills translates to a failure to contribute up to 3.5% to Ireland’s GNP • Diversity within and across cultures

  12. Activity – Connect the dots

  13. Why do we need to be diversity aware? Demographic trends • Every workforce is diverse • Demands of a changing workforce profile Business environment • Utilising all our people yields competitive advantage • Failure to integrate skills translates to a failure to contribute up to 3.5% to Ireland’s GNP • Diversity within and across cultures Legal impetus • Compliance with legislation

  14. Equality legislation Religion Sexual orientation Disability Membership of the traveller community • Gender • Age • Race • Marital status • Family status

  15. Discrimination • Direct Discrimination • Indirect Discrimination • Discrimination by Association

  16. Redress - Non Pay Case • Non-employee at time of referral of claim (excluding dismissal claim) - €12,697 • Employees (and dismissed employees) - 2 years remuneration • Sanction imposed must have a dissuasive effect on the employer and must be adequate in relation to damage sustained in order to ensure real and effective judicial protection

  17. Redress - Equal Pay Case • Equality Officer/Labour Court • Maximum 3 years’ loss of pay • Circuit Court (gender cases only) • Maximum 6 years’ loss of pay

  18. Compensation

  19. Sample cases • Equality Authority v. Ryanair, 2001 • Recruitment advertisement and discrimination • €10,157.97 compensation plus action • Cunningham v. BMS Sales Ltd • Application form with age and birth date • €5,000 compensation

  20. Managing risk and reputation Equality ruling favours foreign workers Company pay circa €56k for 'victimising' pregnant worker Foreign labour ‘wildcat’ strikes escalate as nuclear plants join protest Tribunal reports huge rise in race discrimination cases Teacher gets €6,500 from equality case Race, age, disability, gender dominate work discrimination cases 28% increase in work-related discrimination claims Company ordered to pay €7,000 over bias against pregnant employee Civil servant awarded €60,000 over age discrimination

  21. Potential benefits of diversity and inclusion • Competitive edge through improving customer service • Larger market share • Cost savings through increased retention rates • Larger pool of talent • Committed and flexible workforce • Meeting employee expectations • Responding to social and demographic changes

  22. Potential Gains – IBEC HRM Survey • Improved company culture • Improved retention/ recruitment • Increased commitment / loyalty from staff • Improved staff morale • Lowered staff turnover • Better understanding of business

  23. Multiple stakeholder benefits Employee Employer Creativity Innovation Fun at work Greater employee satisfaction Teamwork Conflict avoidance Fewer complaints and grievances Reduced stress, sickness, absenteeism Increased productivity Quality improvement Customer friendly Increased market opportunities Access to talent High Performance Bottom line, shareholder value, revenue Employer of choice Reputation & brand

  24. Business Case - Example • The Dove soap marketing campaign underpinned by a clear diversity philosophy and message is estimated to have resulted in a 700% increase in sales for Unilever. • TNT calculates that the effective management of diversity and inclusion has resulted in the reduction of staff turnover from 25% in 2000 to 10% in 2003 with a similar reduction in absenteeism. • Royal Mail in the UK estimates that it has achieved savings of £7Million from the introduction of anti-bullying and harassment policies. Source – The Business Impact of Equality and Diversity – The International Evidence - Kathy Monks National Centre for Partnership and Performance and Equality Authority

  25. Case studies • O2 Ability Awards • Best Places to Work Award • Business working responsibly award

  26. Customers • In the past – young, middle class, white • Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender community • Women as investors and consumers • Older individuals • Global opportunities – requires cultural competence

  27. Cultural competence • Cultural competence refers to an ability to interact effectively with people of different cultures. • Communication – non-verbal • Eye contact, facial expressions • Gestures • Communication – oral • Communication - written

  28. Cultural competence - gestures • Emblems – “thumbs up” • Illustrators – holding up number of fingers to convey time left • Regulators – making a circle with your hand = “ok”, “money” or “worthless” • Affect displays – smile or tears • Adaptors – yawn or clenched fist

  29. Cultural competence • Cultural competence refers to an ability to interact effectively with people of different cultures. • Communication – non-verbal • Eye contact, facial expressions • Gestures • Space • Communication – oral or written

  30. Diversity – Equality Continuum 9 Equality Grounds Integrated Workplace Compliance Recruitment, Promotion, Training, Rewards, Performance Management, Work-life Balance

  31. A diversity approach emanates from the widespread perceived need to link equality objectives to broader business and organisational objectives. It is argued that failure to do so has been one of the key weaknesses of the traditional ‘equal opportunity’ approach therefore, diversity is said to constitute a ‘new way forward’Institute of Personnel & Development

  32. Examples of where it has gone wrong • Banter • Sickness reporting • Inappropriate questioning • Terminology • Causing offence • Assuming, presuming and generalising

  33. What is unconscious bias? • Unconscious: • adjective1 not awake and aware of and responding to one’s environment. 2done or existing without one realizing. 3 unaware of. • noun (the unconscious) the part of the mind which is inaccessible to the conscious mind but which affects behaviour and emotions. • Bias: • noun inclination or prejudice in favour of a particular person, thing, or viewpoint.

  34. What is unconscious bias? • Our fundamental way of looking at and encountering the world is driven by a “hard-wired” pattern of making unconscious decisions about others based on what feels safe, likeable, valuable, and competent. (Ross, 2008) • Everyone has some biases, which can be either positive or negative and which we maybe unaware of i.e. they are unconscious.

  35. Unconscious bias • Stems from our natural tendency to make associations to help us organise our social worlds • Most people believe that they hold fewer biases than the average person • Traditional paradigm ~ “good person, bad person” paradigm of diversity • A barrier to workplace equality that may persist despite a general commitment to increase diversity • Virtually every one of us is biased towards something, somebody, some group

  36. Approximately what age is the woman?

  37. How many ladies do you see?

  38. Same dynamic occurs in the way we: Recruit people Mentor employees Assign projects Offer training opportunities Listen to people’s ideas and suggestions Interact with colleagues Make promotional choices Give performance reviews Decide organisational policy Conduct marketing campaigns Treat customers

  39. Some examples of unconscious bias • Less than 15% of American men are over six foot tall, yet almost 60% of corporate CEOs are over six foot tall. • Less than 4% of American men are over six foot, two inches tall, yet more than 36% of corporate CEOs are over six foot, two inches tall¹ • Gender bias: our assumptions about the characteristics of men and women. • Maternal Wall • She is not competent enough • When the term ‘manager’ is used which leads 80% of people to think of a male

  40. Supported by research • CV discrimination research - Equality Authority & ESRI, 2009 • Discrimination consistent across the names, occupations and different business sectors tested • Internationally • Males selected over females • White/Asian American over African/Mexican American • Even higher quality CV’s received fewer call-backs for minorities than lower quality CV’s for white candidates

  41. Companies that face intense competitive situations will figure out over time, that all that matters is talent. Bias of any kind is an unaffordable luxury.Carly Fiorina, ex-chief executive Hewlett Packard

  42. The organisational unconscious • Unconscious behaviour is not just individual; it influences organisational culture as well. • Organisational culture is more or less an enduring collection of basic assumptions and ways of interpreting things that a given organisation has invented, discovered, or developed in learning to cope with its internal and external influences. • Unconscious organisational patterns, or “norms” of behaviour, exert an enormous influence over organisational decisions, choices, and behaviours.

  43. The organisational unconscious • “Flexible work” arrangements are one area in which the conflict between our conscious choices and the “organisational unconscious” is coming to a head. • Conflicts such as this can leave employees frustrated by the feeling that their leaders and the company as a whole are disingenuous in their statements, when in actuality the leaders may not see the conflict themselves.

  44. What do you think? A woman applies for a job with a catering firm. She is turned down, on the grounds that the company is only hiring people who have a formal catering qualification. Afterwards, she finds out that a friend who has no qualifications but has a different skin colour, and was interviewed after her, has been offered the job. Is this discrimination? Answer: Probably yes. Discrimination on the grounds of race or ethnic origin is illegal throughout the EU, including in employment. The circumstances suggest there is a case to answer here. It would be up to the employer to prove otherwise.

  45. What do you think? A young woman works for an IT company. She takes on more and more responsibility but her manager refuses to promote her, as he says she is too young and would not command the respect of other members of the team. Is this discrimination? Answer: Yes, because he has clearly stated that her age is the reason for refusing her promotion. Discrimination at work on the grounds of age is illegal throughout the EU. If the woman is able to take on more responsibility, she should be promoted regardless of her age.

  46. What do you think? A man works in a bar. His colleagues perceive him as being gay and constantly make remarks and jokes about his sexual preferences. Is this discrimination? • Yes, he is being treated unfairly. • No, it’s not serious – everyone’s colleagues make jokes. • It depends whether the jokes are degrading.

  47. What do you think? A man works in a bar. His colleagues perceive him as being gay and constantly make remarks and jokes about his sexual preferences. Is this discrimination? Answer: A: Making jokes and derogatory comments at work about somebody’s sexual orientation is unfair and constitutes harassment. This would create an atmosphere in which the man would find it difficult to work effectively, and might even push him into resigning from his job. Discrimination on the grounds of somebody’s sexual orientation is illegal under Irish legislation (Employment Equality Acts 1998-2008).

  48. What do you think? Imagine now that you also work in the shop. What should you do when you see your colleagues tease the man? • You laugh along with them – it’s only a bit of fun. • You ignore the situation, hoping it will just go away. • You offer your support to the man.

  49. What do you think? Imagine now that you also work in the shop. What should you do when you see your colleagues tease the man? Answer: C Although it’s sometimes easier to ignore the situation, if you see someone being discriminated against he/she may need your support – for example, you should encourage him/her to speak to your manager, or offer advice where to go for information.