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FRIDGE Food-Related Intergenerational Discussion Group Experiences Food, Family and Fellowship

FRIDGE Food-Related Intergenerational Discussion Group Experiences Food, Family and Fellowship

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FRIDGE Food-Related Intergenerational Discussion Group Experiences Food, Family and Fellowship

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  1. FRIDGEFood-Related Intergenerational Discussion Group ExperiencesFood, Family and Fellowship Frances Alloway M.A., R.D., L.D.N. Penn State Cooperative Extension Generations United International Conference July 29, 2009

  2. *Penn State University Philadelphia

  3. Focus Group Purpose • 3 Focus groups in various counties to determine how family members from different generations discuss food and healthy eating issues. • Assess members’ interest in participating in a multi-generational program.

  4. Results of Focus Group • Participants understand but do not apply nutritional knowledge. • Poor family communication stood as a barrier for achieving healthy eating goals. • Participants indicated a desire for a program that would encourage better family communication about food.

  5. Participants recommendations for future nutrition education programs Include fun, hands on activities such as preparing various foods and games Include methods that stimulates sharing between participants Include regular meetings, ideally twice a week Interest in multifamily, multigenerational

  6. FRIDGE was developed in 2007 by a diverse team of individuals with skills in the areas of nutrition education, family intervention programs, human development, and program evaluation. Team members included: Matt Kaplan, Fran Alloway, Nancy Crago, Flavia Herzog, Lynn James, Nancy Kiernan, Wendy Middlemiss, Tanya Nolte, and Laurie Weinreb-Welch. FRIDGE – the Curriculum Developed in 2007 by a PSU team with skills in: - Nutrition Education - Family Intervention - Human Development - Program Evaluation - Multigenerational Programming

  7. FRIDGE Objectives • Help families communicate effectively and in a positive manner. • Provide nutrition education to reach out to the “entire family”. • Work as partners to achieve their healthy eating goals

  8. Pilot Study – Related Methods • Piloted at 5 sites throughout Pennsylvania • Program facilitated by nutrition educators and program coordinators. • 23 families participated. • Total of 46 individuals • 23 Children • 23 Adults

  9. Pilot Overview • Each program involved 4-8 families. • Each family was represented by two or more generations (children of ages 11-14 and their parents/ grandparents/ other caregivers). • Program was run in 3 half-day segments or as a 1½ day program.

  10. Characteristics of FRIDGE The curriculum has three sections • Enhancing family communication about food. • Learning together about food and nutrition • Working as a team to improve family eating practices

  11. Ice Breakers and Takes Outs • Ice Breakers • Help participants ease into program. • Encourage openness and sharing between family members and other families. • Promote full participation. • Take Outs • Reinforce lessons at home • Apply skills learned in class

  12. Section 1: Enhancing Family Communication about Food Activities • Icebreaker: Food Becomes You • The Think You Know Me? game (similar to the “Newlywed Game”) • RECIPE for Good Communication • Coolish or Foolish – talking about peer pressure and food choices.

  13. Section 2: Learning Together about Food and Nutrition Activities • Icebreaker: Two Truths and a Could Be • Dietary Knowledge Timeline • Back to the Future: Food Time Capsule. • Baking Now and Then • Internet Recipe Scavenger Hunt [optional] • “Take out” Activity: The Family Meeting

  14. Section 3: Working as a team to improve family eating practices Activities • The Family Food Puzzle • Making Decisions About Food – From Me to We • “Dinnertime” poem – What Does it Mean to Eat Together? • Out with the Unhealthy and In with the Healthy • “Take Out” activity: A Family Food Contract

  15. “Dinnertime” poem What Does it Mean to Eat Together?

  16. Adult Results of Pilot Study Frequency of healthy eating behaviors(e.g., daily fruits and vegetables). Ability to explain changes in food guidance system. # of family members who help prepare grocery list. # of family members who help with meal planning.

  17. Youth Results of Pilot Study Frequency of trying new fruits and vegetables. Ability to explain changes in food guidance system. # of family members who helped prepare the grocery list. Youth involvement in food purchases decisions.* Youth involvement in deciding how the family eats.* * Question was about who has the most say in making food-related decisions. Response options: 1=Children with little listening (to parents), 2= Children with some listening (to parents), 3=children and parents together, 4=parents with some listening (to children), 5-parents with little listening (to children).

  18. Conclusion • Adults and children enjoyed discussing food. • Both generations reported improved eating practices. • Increased communication led to greater family participation in food purchases and meal planning.

  19. Questions and Comments? Thank you!

  20. The Penn State Intergenerational Programhttp://intergenerational.cas.psu.edu The Penn State Intergenerational Program, rooted in Penn State Cooperative Extension, provides leadership and resource support for organizations interested in developing intergenerational programs and activities that enrich people’s lives and help address vital social and community issues. Ordering information for FRIDGE: http://intergenerational.cas.psu.edu/FRIDGE.html