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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention PowerPoint Presentation
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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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  1. Progress in use of electronic medical records by office-based physicians in 2006 by Esther Hing, M.P.H., and Catharine W. Burt, Ed.D Annual meeting Academy Health June 10, 2008 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics

  2. Objectives • Examine progress in use of electronic medical record (EMR) systems among office-based physicians since 2001. • Focus on changes in use between 2005 and 2006 • Examine plans to install new EMR system or replace current system within the next 3 years

  3. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey • Annual nationally-representative surveys of office-based physicians • 3,350 in 2006 • Scope: Nonfederal office-based physicians excluding radiologists, anesthesiologists, and pathologists • Face-to-face induction interview • Response rates for data presented ~64% • NAMCS estimates based on • 1,311 physician responses in 2006

  4. Benchmark use of health information technology

  5. Question on electronic medical records use: • Does your practice use electronic medical records? • Yes, all electronic • Yes, part paper, part electronic • No • Don’t know

  6. Percent of office-based physicians using EMRs SOURCE: CDC/NCHS, National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2001-2006

  7. Diffusion of EMRs among physicians by practice size 11 or more physicians 6-10 physicians 3-5 physicians Partner Solo NOTES: Office-based physicians include nonfederal, office-based physicians who see patients in an office setting. Excludes radiologists, anesthesiologists, and pathologists. Sources: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey , 2001-2006

  8. Percent of Office-Based PhysiciansUsing Selected EMR Features: 2006 Source: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2006

  9. Percent of Office-Based PhysiciansUsing Selected EMR Features: 2005-2006 1/ Trend is statistically significant (p<0.05). Source: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2005- 2006

  10. Percent of office-based physicians using any EMR and minimally functional EMR Any EMR Miinimally functional EMR NOTES: EMR is electronic medical record. Trend for any EMR is significant (p<0.05). SOURCE: CDC/NCHS, National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2001-2006

  11. Percent of office-based physicians using minimally functional EMR systemsby physician specialty type 1/ Trend is statistically significant (p<0.05). SOURCE: CDC/NCHS, National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2001-2006

  12. Percent of office-based physicians using minimally functional EMR systemsby percent of revenues from Medicaid 1/ Trend is statistically significant (p<0.05). SOURCE: CDC/NCHS, National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2001-2006

  13. Percent of office-based physicians using minimally functional EMR systemsby geographic region 1/ Trend is statistically significant (p<0.05). SOURCE: CDC/NCHS, National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2001-2006

  14. Physicians planning new or replacement EMR systems within next 3 years NOTES: EMR is electronic medical records. Excludes physicians currently using minimally functional EMR systems. SOURCE: CDC/NCHS, National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2006

  15. Physicians planning new or replacement EMR Systems within next 3 years by geographic region 49.6 44.1 40.1 30.3 NOTE: Excludes physicians using minimally functional EMR systems. Source: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2006.

  16. Conclusions • Use of electronic medical records between 2001 and 2006 increased by 60% among office-based physicians. • Measurement of EMR systems by included functionalities started in 2005. Based on presence of four key features, only 1 in 10 office-based physicians used minimally functional EMR systems during 2005-2006

  17. Conclusions • In 2006, 35-43% of physicians not currently using a minimally functional EMR system planned to install or replace their current system within the next three years; an additional 12-17% of physicians considered doing so. • Based on physician report of plans to install or replace current EMR systems, EMR use in 2009 may increase to 42%, at a minimum, or 54% at a maximum. • These projections are consistent with diffusion theory projections (Ford, Menachemi, Phillips, 2006).

  18. Policy implications • Based on our study-based and diffusion theory projections, electronic health record (EHR) use by office-based physicians will fall short of the federal goal of widespread use by 2014. • Continued efforts by the Office of National Coordinator for Health Information Technology and other organizations are needed to promote universal adoption of functional EMR systems.