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EXPLORE Instructional Support Workshop PowerPoint Presentation
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EXPLORE Instructional Support Workshop

EXPLORE Instructional Support Workshop

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EXPLORE Instructional Support Workshop

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  1. EXPLORE Instructional Support Workshop

  2. Gennine Brewer, MASenior Consultant P-16 Assessment Services gennine.brewer@act.org404-231-1952 ACT Atlanta, GA Office

  3. Topics/Agenda • College and Career Readiness • Assessment Overview • Student Score Report • Break • Supplemental Report Review • Review of Resources

  4. What is College Readiness? Level of student preparation needed to be ready to enroll and succeed without remediation in college-level, credit-bearing coursework

  5. What is Our Research Telling Us? October 2004

  6. College and Workforce Ready National research provides empirical evidence that the levels of readiness that high school graduates need to be prepared for college and workforce training are comparable. All students, therefore, should “experience a common academic program….regardless of their postgraduation plans.” College-Ready and Work-Ready: Same or Different? ACT 2006

  7. Rigorous Curriculum for ALL Students No matter where they are bound: Vocational or Technical Colleges Apprenticeships Community College, or 4-year College Directly into the workforce …a rigorous college preparatory curriculum gives students the best options for life after high school.

  8. College Readiness Begins in Middle School ACT Policy Report

  9. CR Begins in Middle School Examined the extent of early exploration and planning in certain college readiness areas Setting educational goals Selecting classes Exploring Postsecondary options Explore how parents, school staff and school experiences help students with their early educational planning

  10. CR Begins in Middle School Four Policy Recommendations: College Readiness should begin in middle school Schools should explain to students and their parents the effects of taking a rigorous curriculum on their future educational, career and income options 3. Schools should use multiple sources of information, including standardized assessments, to help inform students and their parents of the students’ progress toward college readiness 4. Schools should work with families to calculate college costs and develop a plan to meet these rising costs.

  11. When students’ skills are improved during middle school, the results by the end of high school can be astounding MAKING READINESS A REALITYMonitor College Readiness Early Based on more than 540,000 8th graders whotook EXPLORE in 2007: Majority of students are not on target in middle school to be ready for college-level work after high school ACT data suggests that students who enter high school lacking prerequisite skills rarely ever catch up

  12. EXPLORE- 8th or 9th PLAN- 10th ACT- 11th or 12th Assessment Student Planning Instructional Support Evaluation CCRS – College And Career Readiness System

  13. Score Scales Relationship 40 36 32 35 30 25 25 20 English Math Reading Science English Math Reading Science English Math Reading Science 15 10 5 0 EXPLORE 8th/9th Grade PLAN 10th grade ACT 11th/12th grade

  14. Guiding Principles of CCRS • The CCRS tests are achievement tests. They are tests of acquired or developed abilities. • The tasks (questions) constituting all CCRS tests correspond to recognized middle and high school learning experiences. • The CCRS tests consists of complex, heterogeneous tasks that require students to use skills and knowledge developed over time to solve them. • Each test is developmentally appropriate for the grade level

  15. What We Need to Know to Help Students’ Scores Improve • How the test measures the skills • What skills the test measures • How the test relates to my curriculum • What skills my students already know • What skills my students need to learn • What instructional methods would be most effective in meeting the students’ needs . . . as a base for building instructional strategies

  16. College and Career Readiness System- CCRS CONTENT How are the test constructed? What do the tests measure?

  17. College and Career Readiness System Test Development • Content Development • State objectives • State approved texts • National professional organizations • Focus groups • Maintaining Curriculum Basis • National Curriculum Survey • State frameworks reviews

  18. College and Career Readiness System Test Development • All skills measured on the ACT Assessment, PLAN, and EXPLORE are included in the NAEP standards • The skills measured on the ACT Assessment, PLAN, and EXPLORE have been compared to the standards in over 39 states including Alabama’s.

  19. Latest NCS Results • English • HS: Focus on Idea Development • PS: Focus on Writing Mechanics • Mathematics • HS: Focus on Advanced Mathematics Content • PS: Focus on Developing More Rigorous Understanding of Fundamentals

  20. Latest NCS Results • Reading • HS: Decreased Focus on Reading Strategies after Ninth Grade • PS: Focus on Reading Strategies in Complex Text • Science • HS: Focus on Science Content • PS: Focus on Process and Inquiry Skills in Science

  21. English Test Designed to measure students’ ability to effectively communicate meaning by: • Critiquing • Revising • Editing

  22. 2563% 1537% 3060% 2040% Usage/Mechanics Rhetorical Skills 4053% 3547% English Test 2 sub-scores EXPLORE PLAN ACT Punctuation6(.15)7(.14) 10(.13) Grammar and Usage8(.20)9(.18)12(.16) Sentence Structure11(.28)14(.28)18 (.24) Strategy 5 (.12) 6 (.12) 12 (.16) Organization 5 (.12) 7 (.14) 11 (.15) Style 5 (.12) 7 (.14) 12 (.16) Total405075 4 300 Words 4 300 Words Passages Passage Length 5 325 Words

  23. Mathematics Test • Requires Students to • Analyze problems – in both real world and purely mathematical settings • Plan and carry out strategies • Verify appropriateness of solutions

  24. EXPLORE PLAN ACT 14 10 14 9 9 4 60 4 10 9 7 30 (.13) (.33) (.30) (.23) 14 8 11 7 40 (.35) (.20) (.27) (.18) (.23) (.17) (.23) (.15) (.15) (.07) Mathematics Test Content Area Basic Statistical/ Probability Concepts Pre-Algebra Elementary Algebra Pre-Geometry Plane Geometry Coordinate Geometry Intermediate Algebra Trigonometry Total

  25. Reading Test • Measures student proficiencies in understanding and deriving meaning from texts ranging from fiction narratives to informational passages • Measures vocabulary by determining the meaning of unfamiliar or multiple-meaning words from context • Measures skills used to read and understand published materials

  26. EXPLORE PLAN ACT 10 10 10 10 40 10 10 10 30 (.33) (.33) (.33) 8 9 8 25 (.32) (.36) (.32) (.25) (.25) (.25) (.25) 4 750 Words 3 500 Words 3 500 Words Reading Test Content Area Prose Fiction Humanities Social Sciences Natural Sciences Total Passages Passage Length

  27. Reading Between the Lines • Those ACT-tested students who can read complex texts are more likely to be ready for college • Performance on complex texts is the clearest differentiator in reading between students who are likely to be ready for college and those who are not. And this is true for both genders, all racial/ethnic groups, and all annual family income levels • More students are on track to being ready for college-level reading in 8th & 9th grade than are actually ready by the time they reach 12th grade • Not enough high school teachers are teaching reading skills or strategies and many students are victims of teachers’ low expectations

  28. Science Test • Measures student proficiencies in using and reasoning with science information, skills, and knowledge • Asks Students to: • Communicate information and use scientific research strategies • Make comparisons between, and draw conclusions from scientific findings, studies, and viewpoints

  29. 1 Content areas are distributed over all formats Science Test - EXPLORE Data Representation Research Summaries Conflicting Viewpoints ContentArea1Format Life Science Physical Science Earth/Space Science

  30. ACT 1-2* 1-2* 1-2* 1-2* 7 EXPLORE 3 2 1 6 PLAN 1-2* 1-2* 1-2* 1-2* 5 Science Test - Passages Content Area Life Science Physical Science Earth/Space Science Biology Chemistry Physics Total *At least one topic is required in this content area, and some test forms may have two topics. No more than two topics in a particular content area are allowed.

  31. Student Score Report Review

  32. Student Score Reports • What do they tell you? • Academic strengths and weaknesses • Career and Postsecondary aspirations • College Readiness Indicators • Foundation of all aggregate reporting

  33. Using Your EXPLORE Results

  34. Student/School Information

  35. Range (1-25) Composite Score 15 What do Your Scores Mean?

  36. Your Estimated PLAN Composite Score Range

  37. English: 4 years Social Sciences: At least 3 years Mathematics: At least 3 years Natural Sciences: At least 3 years ACT Recommended CourseworkACT Minimum Core

  38. Importance of Rigorous Coursework • A rigorous college preparatory curriculum in high school is the best indicator of college success. To help students develop proficiency in the four core content areas, ACT strongly recommends that students take, at a minimum: • Math (3 years+) • Algebra I • Algebra II • Geometry • Trigonometry (1 semester or more) • Calculus (1 semester or more) • Any courses beyond Algebra II • English (4 years+) • English 9 • English 10 • English 11 • English 12 • Social Studies (3 years+) • American History • World History • American Government • Economics • Geography • Psychology • History Other (European, State, etc.) • Natural Science (3 years+) • General/Physical/Earth • Biology • Chemistry • Physics

  39. Your High School Course PlansCompared to Core

  40. Your Reported Needs

  41. Your Plans for After High School

  42. MALLARD FILLMORE by Bruce Tinsley MALLARD FILLMORE by Bruce Tinsley College Readiness

  43. College Readiness Benchmark Scores *The ACT Benchmark Score indicates a 50% chance of obtaining a “B” or a 75% chance of obtaining a “C” in corresponding credit-bearing college courses.

  44. Recent ACT Research Students who meet ACT’s College Readiness Benchmarks are: • substantially more likely to enroll in college • less likely to need remediation • more likely to achieve a grade of B or higher in specific college courses • More likely to re-enroll at the same postsecondary institution their second year

  45. College Readiness

  46. Included in all CCRS tests 72 item unisex interest inventory of work relevant activities Identifies personally relevant career options Bridged to World-Of Work Map and Holland Types

  47. World of Work MapInterest Inventory Results