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K ARL R AUSCHER R USS W AUGHMAN B ILL S MITH G EE R ITTENHOUSE

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  1. WIRELESS EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAMReport toFederal Communications Commission, Network Reliability and Interoperability Council VOctober 30, 2001 KARL RAUSCHER RUSS WAUGHMAN BILL SMITH GEE RITTENHOUSE Director, Network Reliability Lucent Technologies Project Lead AT&T Wireless President, Interconnection Services & CTO BellSouth Director, Wireless Research Lucent Technologies

  2. Mission The Wireless Emergency Response Team was established on the night of September 11, 2001 to provide coordinated wireless industry mutual aid support for Search and Rescue efforts at the World Trade Center rubble. K. F. RAUSCHER

  3. Summary Statistics • No survivors were found • 33 organizations participated • 250+ industry subject matter experts participated • An additional ~500 volunteers staffed the Public Call Center • 134 Key Learnings • 23 Recommendations • 5,039 calls received in the WERT Public Call Center • 120 reports of a missing person’s use of a cell phone or pager from the rubble K. F. RAUSCHER

  4. Participating Organizations Arch Wireless Argonne National Labratory AT&T AT&T Wireless BellSouth CTIA Cingular Interactive EDO Corporation Ericsson FCC Lucent Technologies SkyTel Sprint PCS Telcordia Technologies TruePosition U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Marshals Service, ESU U.S. Secret Service Verizon Verizon Wireless VoiceStream Wheat International Metrocall Motorola NCS NCC NRSC NRIC Nextel NYPD NYC Mayor’s Office Nortel Networks PCIA K. F. RAUSCHER

  5. Wireless Emergency Response Team Locations Locations of Operation Coordination Command Center Network Surveillance & Analysis Public Call Center Ground Zero Locating Service Provider Intelligence K. F. RAUSCHER

  6. Outline • WERT Mission • Team Functions • Coordination Command Center – Karl Rauscher • Network Surveillance & Analysis - Russ Waughman • Service Provider Intelligence • Public Call Center - Bill Smith • Ground Zero Locating - Gee Rittenhouse • Next Steps Section 3 • Approach / Participants • Key Learnings • What Worked Well • Areas for Improvement • Areas for Further Investigation • Recommendations K. F. RAUSCHER

  7. Coordination Command Center: Approach & Participants • Mission of the Coordination Command Center was to • Provide leadership for the entire team • Coordinate with authorities • Manage media interfaces • Facilitate intra-team communications • Participating Organizations • AT&T • FCC • Lucent Technologies • NCS / NCC K. F. RAUSCHER

  8. Coordination Command Center: Key Learnings • What Worked Well • high commitment of professionals/organizations in mutual aid • pre-established federal coordination function of NCC • ability to conduct rapid research • Areas for Improvement • pre-established legal framework • pre-defined processes, definitions and templates • broad language translation capabilities • Areas for Further Investigation • guidelines for communication with a trapped survivor between detection and location • special instructions for 911 centers for handling wireless callers • list of WERT capabilities available to emergency response teams K. F. RAUSCHER

  9. Coordination Command Center: Recommendations Recommendation CCC-1. NSA-1, SPI-1, PCC-1, GZL-1 The WERT 134 Key Learnings should be reviewed by the communications industry and emergency response entities for inclusion in Best Practices. Recommendation NSA-2 Establish WERT as a permanent entity, with contact names and reach numbers of all carriers. Recommendation CCC-4 The WERT should determine the most appropriate oversight of its operation. This oversight should ensure appropriate support and cooperation so that its Key Learnings and Recommendations can be properly addressed. K. F. RAUSCHER

  10. Outline • WERT Mission • Team Functions • Coordination Command Center • Network Surveillance & Analysis - Russ Waughman • Service Provider Intelligence • Public Call Center - Bill Smith • Ground Zero Locating - Gee Rittenhouse • Next Steps Section 4 • Approach / Participants • Key Learnings • What Worked Well • Areas for Improvement • Areas for Further Investigation • Recommendations K. F. RAUSCHER

  11. Network Surveillance & Analysis: Approach & Participants • Mission of the Network Surveillance & Analysis Sub Team was to: • Look for any activity on call center list. • Registration, Calls, or Text Messaging activity, • Proactively screen 911 calls for false alarms. • Identify cell site of 911 call. • Look at call and registration history. • Participating Organizations Arch Wireless AT&T Wireless Cingular Interactive Metrocall Nextel Skytel Sprint PCS Verizon Wireless VoiceStream K. F. RAUSCHER

  12. Network Surveillance & Analysis: Key Learnings • What Worked Well • Adapted fraud, billing and trouble shooting tools to quickly screen call center list and 911 calls. • Actively pinged pagers. • Provided guidelines via text messages for preserving battery life. • Areas for Improvement • Handling 911 calls from a 3rd party. • Identifying Search and Rescue mobile phones. • Areas for Further Investigation • Use of text messaging to communicate with a victim. • Would the techniques learned work in another disaster scenario? K. F. RAUSCHER

  13. Network Surveillance & Analysis: Recommendations Recommendation NSA-7 The WERT needs to consider how to prepare for disaster situations with significantly different characteristics. For example, where the disaster region is over several square miles . . . Recommendation NSA-5 [The wireless industry should evaluate possible methods for summoning aid using text messaging.] Recommendation NSA-6 The WERT Network and Surveillance and Analysis Sub Team should periodically rehearse the execution of its function. This exercise should include coordination with the other WERT functions, and directing the Ground Zero Sub Team in their function. K. F. RAUSCHER

  14. Outline • WERT Mission • Team Functions • Coordination Command Center • Network Surveillance & Analysis - Russ Waughman • Service Provider Intelligence – (Stu Freidlin) • Public Call Center - Bill Smith • Ground Zero Locating - Gee Rittenhouse • Next Steps Section 5 K. F. RAUSCHER

  15. Service Provider Intelligence: Approach & Participants • Mission of the Service Provider Intelligence Sub Team: • provide rapid response database lookup information: associating service provider names, switch addresses, and tandem homing arrangement information with cellular phone numbers • Participating Organization: • Telcordia Technologies K. F. RAUSCHER

  16. Outline • WERT Mission • Team Functions • Coordination Command Center • Network Surveillance & Analysis - Russ Waughman • Service Provider Intelligence • Public Call Center - Bill Smith • Ground Zero Locating - Gee Rittenhouse • Next Steps Section 6 • Approach / Participants • Key Learnings • What Worked Well • Areas for Improvement • Areas for Further Investigation • Recommendations K. F. RAUSCHER

  17. Public Call Center: Approach & Participants • Mission of the Public Call Center was to • Off load calls from 911 command center and other government entities • Receive calls and collect information about potentially trapped survivors • Obtain cell and pager numbers for missing persons • Approach • BellSouth accepted request to establish call center • Formed organizing team and developed a plan • Evacuated existing call center & utilized existing 800 number • Recruited BellSouth employees as volunteers • Developed a recorded announcement and operator script for the call center • Publicized 800 number via media outlets • Established call center within 7 hours of request. • Handled ~5000 calls in 5 days • Participating Organization: BellSouth K. F. RAUSCHER

  18. Public Call Center: Key Learnings • What Worked Well • existing call center & 800 number facilitated quick response • ability to overcome “secure information” restraints • escalation desk and conference bridge to handle leads for trapped survivors • BellSouth’s size and experience enabled quick response to recruit, organize and train large numbers of volunteers • call data input electronically and transmitted hourly to WERT command center • Opportunities for Improvement • identify communications companies available to establish call centers • establish (2) toll-free numbers as permanent numbers for future emergencies • Web based, secure site for real-time data entry • publicize what is being done with information • develop process for follow up • consider language barriers and access to 800 numbers for international callers • train operators on criteria to escalate calls • collection of ANI and CLID from call center and cell phone calls K. F. RAUSCHER

  19. Public Call Center: Recommendations Recommendation PCC-1 The WERT Public Call Center 30 Key Learnings should be reviewed by the larger communications industry for inclusion in industry Best Practices. Recommendation PCC-2 Major communications companies should have a contingency plan to offer a public call center for a mutual aid national crisis. K. F. RAUSCHER

  20. Outline • WERT Mission • Team Functions • Coordination Command Center • Network Surveillance & Analysis - Russ Waughman • Service Provider Intelligence • Public Call Center - Bill Smith • Ground Zero Locating - Gee Rittenhouse • Next Steps Section 7 • Approach / Participants • Key Learnings • What Worked Well • Areas for Improvement • Areas for Further Investigation • Recommendations K. F. RAUSCHER

  21. Ground Zero Locating: Approach & Participants • The goal is to aid and assist in the location of and communication with trapped survivors who possess a variety of wireless personal equipment. Currently there is a high probability that victims will have access to some sort of wireless device (e.g. phone, pager, FOB, etc.). This provides a unique opportunity for passive remote location and establishing a wireless link for remote communication. • Participating Organizations: AWS Nextel Cingular Interactive TruePosition Lucent Technologies Verizon Wireless Motorola Wheat International K. F. RAUSCHER

  22. Ground Zero Locating: Key Learnings • What Worked Well • Provide extended network coverage into debris field using RF. repeaters, autonomous basestations, and basestation simulators. • Valid secondary Mobile Wireless channels for monitoring and network access. • Areas for Improvement • The ability to distinguish between buried mobiles and those around the periphery of the debris field. • True production-quality autonomous mobile equipment capable of providing location, remote network coverage, and two-way communication. • Areas for Further Investigation • The possible addition of an emergency mode for mobile equipment with extreme low-power and location beacons. K. F. RAUSCHER

  23. Ground Zero Locating: Recommendations • With ubiquitous mobile and pager coverage, personal wireless mobile equipment provides a new opportunity for remote location and communication in search and rescue operations. • Minimizes risk to search and rescue teams. • Provides maximum utilization of resources. • Investigate further improvements for this new capability. • Periodic, formal test trials in buildings targeted for demolition. [GZL-7] • Possible location and emergency response enhancements to mobile equipment. [GZL-3] K. F. RAUSCHER

  24. Conclusion: Value Added • Keeping rescue teams from danger by quickly discrediting false reports • Confirming as safe, individuals thought to be missing • Helping family members achieve closure • Assuring the public - both here and abroad - that all known technological approaches were being used to listen for any cellular or pager communication being sent from the rubble. • Documenting Key Learnings and Recommendations in the WERT Final Report - so that this capability can be enhanced and optimized K. F. RAUSCHER

  25. Conclusion: Next Steps • The WERT Final Report available (www.nric.org) • Assess responses to Final Report from: • government authorities • emergency response agencies • industry fora / associations, and • the public • Coordinate proper follow-up for the Key Learnings and Recommendations • Determine appropriate oversight for the WERT capability K. F. RAUSCHER