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CHRISTY HENRICH

CHRISTY HENRICH

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CHRISTY HENRICH

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  1. CHRISTY HENRICH • U.S National Team Gymnast • Silver Medal in Olympic Trials in the all -around

  2. Died from multiple organ failures at age 22 weight 47 pounds due to anorexia.

  3. HEIDI GUENTHER • Ballet dancer • Advised to lose five pounds by the ballet company

  4. Died at 22 due to complications from developing an eating disorder

  5. NADIA COMANECI • 9Olympic Gold Medals • First gymnast to ever receive a perfect 10 • Suffered from both anorexia and bulimia

  6. NANCY KERRIGAN

  7. EATING DISORDERS IN ATHLETES • “My life is a horrifying nightmare. It feels like there's a beast inside me, like a monster. It feels evil” (ChritsyHenrich) • “Athletes are very stubborn, very determined, and they can turn all that against themselves. This is a very, very, very hard disease to reverse…” (Sandy Henrich)

  8. “THAT MAKES SENSE TO ME” • ERIKSON – EGO IDENTITY & ROLE CONFUSION. • “who am I?” -Knowing who you are (fitting in with society) -mold yourself into what your community finds meaningful - Too involved into a particular society? -repudiation to members of society. - self- rejection “…She thinks she's not good enough. She thinks she's never been good enough.” (Sandy Henrich)

  9. Women athletes with disordered eating perceived themselves as fatter than women athletes without disordered eating. (weight) • Big fish little pond theory in regards to eating disorders (you would think…) • But in reality…lack of self- serving bias. Looking at positive body aspects of others and negative aspects of themselves. • Athletes in general had a more negative athletic body image than daily life body image. • Driven by “thin is going to win.”

  10. RISK FACTORS • Environment – excessive exercise and rigid diet. (Amenorrhea) • Socio-cultural pressures; stereotypical body types • Dissonance • Competitiveness • Coaches value performance

  11. CONTINUED… • Physique revealing uniforms • Judging criteria • Transitioning into college (greater personal responsibility, loss of social support, academic demands.) • 90% of those diagnosed are females (Arthur-Cameselle, Baltzell 2012). • Higher prevalence of eating disorders are found in female athletes vs. nonathletes (Greenleaf, Petrie, Carter, Reel, 2009).

  12. Combating eating disorders • More education for coaches and athletes • Deemphasizing weight • Eliminating unhealthy subcultures (cutting weight, group weigh ins) • “Coaches should always stress the importance of healthy eating…” • Emphasize sport skills

  13. CONTINUED… • Avoid singling athletes out in regard to weight or shape • Provide emotional support (can cause reverse effect.) • Address and confront the athlete • Prohibit participation in sport if health risks are evident • Parents and performance

  14. References • Arthur-Cameselle, J. N., & Baltzell, A. (2012). Learning from Collegiate Athletes who have Recovered from Eating Disorders: Advice to Coaches, Parents, and Other Athletes with Eating Disorders. Journal Of Applied Sport Psychology, 24(1), 1-9. • de Bruin, A., Oudejans, R. D., Bakker, F. C., & Woertman, L. (2011). Contextual body image and athletes' disordered eating: The contribution of athletic body image to disordered eating in high performance women athletes. European Eating Disorders Review, 19(3), 201-215. doi:10.1002/erv.1112 • Greenleaf, C., Petrie, T. A., Carter, J., & Reel, J. J. (2009). Female collegiate athletes: Prevalence of eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors. Journal Of American College Health, 57(5), 489-495. doi:10.3200/JACH.57.5.489-496

  15. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CtUs2h_5PJA