uml a business value proposition n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
UML: A Business Value Proposition PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
UML: A Business Value Proposition

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 14

UML: A Business Value Proposition

107 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

UML: A Business Value Proposition

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. UML: A Business Value Proposition CitySPIN – December 2003 Luis Ramirez Managing Director SIAC Requirements Engineering

  2. The Need for Added Value • Current push is for Value-Based software engineering • Inward focus on productivity replaced by outward focus on higher value per unit cost • The people aspects of the implementation of a methodology are critical 12/9/03 CitySPIN

  3. Context: The SIAC Transition • Started about 2 years ago • Initially targeted one mission-critical system – currently adding others • Initial focus - Requirements Engineering • Using UML and the Unified Process 12/9/03 CitySPIN

  4. What is UML? • “A graphical language for visualizing, specifying, constructing, and documenting the artifacts of a software-intensive system” [Booch, Rumbaugh, Jacobson] • UML 1.0 introduced in 1997 • Can be used to model conceptual and concrete things 12/9/03 CitySPIN

  5. Why Use A Modeling Language? • Common notation is easy to understand and manage • A common language can help improve and standardize communications between internal teams and the customers • Modeling can help save time by limiting the style choices so one can concentrate on the job of developing software 12/9/03 CitySPIN

  6. Benefits of UML • Everyone speaks the same language – minimizes costly misunderstandings • Facilitates the creation of standard processes and procedures • Promotes repeatable processes and iterations 12/9/03 CitySPIN

  7. The Value of UML Artifacts • Use Cases Diagrams and Specifications • Scenarios and Storyboards • Sequence Diagrams • Activity Diagrams • Class Diagrams • State Transition Diagrams • Software Requirements Specification 12/9/03 CitySPIN

  8. Lessons Learned • Negotiate real sponsorship • Obtain early buy-in from all involved • Define Roles/Responsibilities early • Educate! Bring in outside help if needed • Communicate! • Recognize when one size does not fit all and provide options • Be the first one to speak up if something does not work/learn from experience 12/9/03 CitySPIN

  9. 12/9/03 CitySPIN

  10. References/Starter Books - 1 • Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh, Ivar Jacobson, The Unified Modeling Language User Guide, [Addison-Wesley Object Technology Series; 1999] • Geri Schneider, Jason P. Winters, Applying Use Cases 2nd edition; a Practical Guide [Addison-Wesley Object Technology Series; series editors Booch, Jacobson, Rumbaugh; 2001] 12/9/03 CitySPIN

  11. References/Starter Books - 2 • Daniel Windle, Rene Abreo, Software Requirements Using the Unified Process – A Practical Approach, [Prentice Hall PTR; 2003] • Scott W. Ambler, The Elements of UML Style [Agile Modeling, Cambridge University Press, 2001] 12/9/03 CitySPIN

  12. Industry Sources - 1 • OMG UML Version 1.5 – www.omg.org/docs/formal/03-03-01.pdf • Agile Modeling Using UML – www.agilemodeling.com 12/9/03 CitySPIN

  13. Industry Sources - 2 • CrossTalk – The Journal of Defense Software Engineering - People Factors in Software Management: Lessons Learned From Comparing Agile and Plan-Driven Methods http://stsc.hill.af.mil/crosstalk/2003/12/0312Turner.html 12/9/03 CitySPIN