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The Revision of CDM and CHSW

The Revision of CDM and CHSW

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The Revision of CDM and CHSW

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  1. The Revision of CDM and CHSW Richard Boland Head of Construction Policy HSE

  2. What I will Cover • Background to industry; • Current performance; • History and Aims of revision; • Main changes; • Key Messages; • Timetable; • Realising the benefits.

  3. Background to the Construction Industry • Output - 8% of UK GDP: 8% working population; • 1.75M site workers and 450k professionals and consultants • 190,000 companies • Over 200+ Stakeholders • No entry threshold/transitory workplaces • £17bn unofficial economy.

  4. Accidents and Ill-Health 2005/06 • Employs 10% of working population, but 28% fatals and 15% major injuries; • 59 fatal accidents to construction workers; • 3677 major injuries to employees; • 7492 over 3 day injuries to employees • 86,000 suffering from work-related ill health. • 3.2 M working days lost per year (injury and illhealth)

  5. Current Industry Performance(Percentage incidence rate changes against targets)

  6. History of the Revision • CDM 1994 came into force on 31 March 1995; • Not widely welcomed at the time; • Slow acceptance, particularly amongst Clients and Designers; • Early concerns about complexity and bureaucracy; • November 2001 revision of CDM ACoP; • March 2005 Consultation; • October 2006 HSC approves package.

  7. What Wasn’t Working? • Mindset of Clients and Designers was slow to change; • Clients had no early access to expert advice; • Competence of organisations and individuals slow to improve; • Communication and co-ordination less than expected; • Effective planning and management less than expected.

  8. What are the aims of the revision? • Simplify the regulations and improve clarity; • Maximise their flexibility; • Focus on planning and management, not ‘The Plan’ and other paperwork; • Strengthen requirements on cooperation and coordination- encourage better integration; • Simplify competence assessment; reduce bureaucracy and raise standards.

  9. What are the main changes? • CHSW and CDM combined; • New trigger for appointments and preparation of the plan; • Clients duty on management arrangements; • A new dutyholder- the coordinator; • Designers to eliminate hazards; reduce risk; • Clarity in relation to competence assessment.

  10. CDM 1994 Enforcing authority; Domestic Client; Demolition; 30 days, 500 person days; 5 or more workers. CDM 2007 Domestic Client; 30 days 500 person days. Trigger for Appointments and Plans

  11. New Duty on Clients • Makes them accountable for the impact they have on H&S standards; • They should make sure things are done, not do them themselves; • Coordinator is their key advisor; • Must provide enough time and resource to allow the project to be delivered safely.

  12. Coordinators • Key Client advisor on competence; provision of information and adequacy of H&S plan; • Coordinate design process and make sure structure is safe to build; safe to use; safe to clean and maintain; safe to demolish; • Should provide the right information to the right people at the right time; • Draw up the health and safety file.

  13. Designers • Must eliminate hazards and reduce risks from the start of the design process; • Designs should be safe to build; safe to use; safe to clean and maintain; safe to demolish; • Should inform others of significant or unusual risks which remain; • Amount of effort put in to risk reduction should be proportionate to the risk.

  14. Competence- three stages • Basic understanding of the risks in construction and how these are controlled; • Sufficient knowledge of the tasks to be undertaken and the risks which the work will entail; • Experience and ability to carry out duties; to recognise your limitations and take action to prevent harm to those carrying out construction work, or those affected by construction work.

  15. Key Messages • Focus will be on effective planning and management of risk; • Paperwork should be risk focussed and project specific; • Provide the right information to the right people at the right time; • All duty holders will need to be competent; • Guidance on competence assessment will be given in the ACoP.

  16. ACOP and Industry Guidance • HSC ‘shortish ACoP which is fit for purpose’; • Supported by Industry produced guidance; • Coordinated through ‘task and finish’ working group of CONIAC.

  17. Timetable • Regulations and ACoP approved by HSC in October 2006; • ACOP published in January 2007; • Regulations laid before Parliament in March 2007; Come into force April 2007; • Timetable is still tight and relies on full engagement and support from industry.

  18. Summary • Evolution, not revolution; • Look for the next Step Change in industry performance; • Focus on effective planning and management through integrated teams; • Actively drive out wasteful bureaucracy; • Real investment in competence and skills of our workforce