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Immigration, Urbanization, and the Gilded Age

Immigration, Urbanization, and the Gilded Age

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Immigration, Urbanization, and the Gilded Age

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  1. Immigration, Urbanization, and the Gilded Age February 17, 2014

  2. Bell Ringer • YOU NEED YOUR BOOK TODAY!!!! • What problems does Chicago face in contemporary society? (Today) • Hint: Think about social and economic problems?

  3. Objective • Today I will be able to make observations and inferences about immigration, urbanization, and the Gilded Age while reading a secondary source (textbook). • Announcements: • Binder Check Friday • Don’t forget  • Office hours moved to Thursday mornings at 7:15. • Questions? Email me or set up a time to meet.

  4. Immigration • Many people from all over the world came to America for new opportunities. • Economic • Social • Religious Freedom • Once in America, groups had to face the challenges of assimilation. • What might some of these problems be?

  5. 19th Century Immigration Statistics

  6. 19th Century Immigration Statistics • Why might different ethnic groups immigrate to America during this time? • Example: Irish Potato Famine

  7. Urbanization • Many immigrants chose to live in cities due to greater opportunities for jobs that required less education/skills. • Even native born Americans moved to the cities from the country. • New industrialized farming equipment required less people working on farms. • Industrialization called for more people working as laborers and in factories.

  8. The Gilded Age • A time of political power. • Political Bosses • Kickbacks • People of similar groups sticking together to gain power. • Voting fraud

  9. 2A Reading Groups

  10. 5A Reading Groups

  11. 7A Reading Groups

  12. Becoming American February 18, 2014

  13. Classwork • Read the handout, “Laundrymen and Movies.” • Answer the following questions: • Why do you think Wong describes herself as “Chinese” rather than American?” • Why do you think she devoted much of the first installment of her memoirs to an event that took place when she was six years old? • What is she trying to tell her fans about herself and other Chinese Americans through this story? • Provide three adjectives that describe what it might be like to immigrate to America in the 19th century.

  14. Objective • Examine the image of the Chinese in films during the 1920s and 1930s to develop an understanding of the challenges and opportunities Chinese Americans faced • Explore the struggle of the Chinese and other immigrant groups to secure a place for themselves in American society as Americans • Announcements: • Binder Check Friday • Don’t forget  • Office hours moved to Thursday mornings at 7:15. • Questions? Email me or set up a time to meet.

  15. Chinese Exclusion Act • On the following slide you will see a timeline of the Chinese Exclusion Act (yes, you have seen it before ) • What do you notice about the experiences of Chinese immigrants during this time? • Who was and was not considered to be American citizens? • What was life like when coming to America from China?

  16. Chinese Exclusion Act

  17. Becoming American • As we watch the video answer the observation and inference questions. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1DuyLRa4zQ&list=PLI5jTkLSc4hyzcuY5Tsosf5mO58jocAOS

  18. Immigration Restriction League February 19, 2014

  19. Bell Ringer • What are some examples of restrictions placed on immigrants coming to the United States? • What might be some reasons for these restrictions? • Why might these restrictions be unjust?

  20. Objective • Today I will be able to identify an author’s claims and/or counterclaims and why those are important to our understanding of history. • Announcements: • Binder Check Friday • Don’t forget  • Office hours moved to Thursday mornings at 7:15. • Questions? Email me or set up a time to meet.

  21. Immigration Restriction League • Founded in 1894 by Harvard graduates • Advocated a literacy requirement as a means to limit immigration into the United States. • League members had lost faith in the nation's ability to assimilate newcomers into its political, social, and cultural fabric. They associated immigration with the socio-economic problems of their increasingly urban and industrialized society • crowded tenements, poverty, crime and delinquency, labor unrest, and violence.

  22. Immigration Restriction League • Made a distinction between the "old immigrants" of English, Irish, and German stock and the "new immigrants" from Italy and Eastern Europe. • claimed that these recently arrived "undesirables" were inherently unable to participate in self-government or to adopt American values. • Many League spokesmen came to identify with the eugenics movement, which found a pseudoscientific basis for the classification and ranking of ethnic and racial groups.

  23. Henry Cabot Lodge • Senator from Massachusetts • Determined to protect the sovereignty of the United States • Helped start the Immigration Restriction League • Believed that some ethnicities were inherently superior to others. • By allowing “inferior” ethnicities into America, it would ruin our political, economic, and social standing. • Proposed a bill to Congress that would require all immigrants to pass a literacy test in order to gain citizenship.

  24. President Grover Cleveland • Argued that granting citizenship based on a literacy test would determine the success of America’s future politically, economically, or socially. • Vetoed Lodge’s bill in 1897

  25. Readings: Henry Cabot Lodge • Read the ideas from Henry Cabot Lodge on why he proposed and supports a literacy test for immigrants. • Before Reading: • Skim and scan • Circle unknown words • Underline/highlight words that stand out to you • Make predictions • During Reading: • Annotate • ! By things that stand out/excite you • ? By things you don’t understand/want to know more about

  26. Readings: President Cleveland • Read the ideas from Henry Cabot Lodge on why he proposed and supports a literacy test for immigrants. • Before Reading: • Skim and scan • Circle unknown words • Underline/highlight words that stand out to you • Make predictions • During Reading: • Annotate • ! By things that stand out/excite you • ? By things you don’t understand/want to know more about

  27. After Reading • Complete the claims and counterclaims handout. • Back up your claims/counterclaims evidence • Be sure to use explicit text evidence. • Use “” marks to signify the evidence. • Be aware of the differences of both men in terms of their views of literacy tests for immigrants. • At the end, write a MEL-Con paragraph providing your views on the literacy test.