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embedded real time systems n.
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Embedded Real-time Systems

Embedded Real-time Systems

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Embedded Real-time Systems

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  1. Embedded Real-time Systems The Linux kernel

  2. The Operating System Kernel • Resident in memory, privileged mode • System calls offer general purpose services • Controls and mediates access to hardware • Implements and supports fundamental abstractions: • Process, file (file system, devices, interprocess communication) • Schedules / allocates system resources: • CPU, memory, disk, devices, etc. • Enforces security and protection • Event driven: • Responds to user requests for service (system calls) • Attends interrupts and exceptions • Context switch at quantum time expiration

  3. What is required? • Applications need an execution environment: • Portability, standard interfaces • File and device controlled access • Preemptive multitasking • Virtual memory (protected memory, paging) • Shared libraries • Shared copy-on-write executables • TCP/IP networking • SMP support • Hardware developers need to integrate new devices • Standard framework to write device drivers • Layered architecture dependent and independent code • Extensibility, dynamic kernel modules

  4. Linux Execution Environment • Program • Libraries • Kernel subsystems

  5. Linux Execution Environment • Execution paths

  6. Linux source code

  7. Linux source code layout • Linux/arch • Architecture dependent code. • Highly-optimized common utility routines such as memcpy • Linux/drivers • Largest amount of code • Device, bus, platform and general directories • Character and block devices , network, video • Buses – pci, agp, usb, pcmcia, scsi, etc • Linux/fs • Virtual file system (VFS) framework. • Actual file systems: • Disk format: ext2, ext3, fat, RAID, journaling, etc • But also in-memory file systems: RAM, Flash, ROM

  8. Linux source code layout • Linux/include • Architecture-dependent include subdirectories. • Need to be included to compile your driver code: • gcc … -I/<kernel-source-tree>/include … • Kernel-only portions are guarded by #ifdefs #ifdef __KERNEL__/* kernel stuff */ #endif • Specific directories: asm, math-emu, net, pcmcia, scsi, video.

  9. Process and System Calls • Process: program in execution. Unique “pid”. Hierarchy. • User address space vs. kernel address space • Application requests OS services through TRAP mechanism • x86: syscall number in eaxregister, exception (int $0x80) • result = read (file descriptor, user buffer, amount in bytes) • Read returns real amount of bytes transferred or error code (<0) • Kernel has access to kernel address space (code, data, and device ports and memory), and to user address space, but only to the process that is currently running • “Current” process descriptor. “currentpid” points to current pid • Two stacks per process: user stack and kernel stack • Special instructions to copy parameters / results between user and kernel space

  10. Scheduling processes • Process scheduling is done at the following events: • 1. the running process switches to the waiting state, • 2. the running process switches to the ready state, • 3. a waiting process switches to the ready state (the woke up process may have higher priority than the previously running process), or • 4. a process terminates. • If scheduling occurs only at 1 and 4, we have non-preemptive scheduli

  11. Preemptive vs non-preemptive scheduling • With preemptive scheduling, another process can be scheduled at any time. • A process which is updating shared data must ensure that no other process also starts using the data (by using a lock for instance). • The first UNIX kernels were non-preemptive which simplified their design, but user processes where scheduled preemptively. • With multiprocessors, UNIX kernels were rewritten with preemptive kernel Process scheduling

  12. Scheduling criteria 1 • CPU utilisation: how busy the CPU is with user processes, • Throughput: number of processes completed per time unit, • Turnaround time: how long time it takes for one process to execute, • Waiting time: how long time a process sits in the ready queue, and • Response time: how long time it takes before a user gets some response (must be very small — otherwise too annoying). • These goals are contradictory, unfortunately

  13. Scheduling criteria 2 • A short response time requires frequent re-scheduling. • Context-switching time can be several percent and compute-intensive jobs are best run to completion with as little scheduling as possible. • For instance, running two long compute-intensive simulations after each other is better on UNIX than running the concurrently (despite losing positive effects of multiprogramming). • In addition to context-switching time, frequent rescheduling increases the number of cache misses.