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Commissioning Plan Adam Bartnik

Commissioning Plan Adam Bartnik

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Commissioning Plan Adam Bartnik

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  1. Commissioning PlanAdam Bartnik

  2. Two Sets of Commissioning Talks The “details” talks… “Commissioning Physics” Detailed plans, focusing on the near term up to 1-pass ER, implications for multiple passes “Commissioning Results” What we have accomplished so far, experimental results, lessons learned

  3. Two Sets of Commissioning Talks The “big-picture” talks… “Scientific Potential” An overview of the project, including (among other things) highest level objectives, milestones, timelines… “Commissioning Plan” A bridge between Georg’s big picture plans to Scott’s more detailed plan

  4. Presentation Goals What do I actually want to talk about? • Repeat some of the big picture plans, decision points, hopefully in more detail • Explain how decisions are made, from big picture to day-to-day operation • Discuss areas where all of this may need some improvement

  5. Milestone Our big picture plan is driven by the remaining NYSERDA milestones 9. Single Pass Beam Energy Scan June 2019 10. Single Pass Beam with Energy Recovery October 2019 11. Four Pass Beam with Energy Recovery December 2019 Let’s spell out what each of these milestones mean…

  6. Milestone Our big picture plan is driven by the remaining NYSERDA milestones 9. Single Pass Beam Energy Scan June 2019 10. Single Pass Beam with Energy Recovery October 2019 11. Four Pass Beam with Energy Recovery December 2019 To complete this milestone, we need to: • Thread the beam through the FFA Arc • Successfully demonstrate orbit correction throughout the arc • Park the beam in the R1 splitter (after the arc) • Raise the MLC energy as high as possible, and repeat above steps • We were able to achieve ~40-60 MeV during the FAT, so a factor of 1.5x • Measure lots of fun things • Orbit, tune, dispersion matching, beam profiles, BPM offsets, … Main point: We know how to do this, and we did it during the FAT on a smaller scale.

  7. Milestone Our big picture plan is driven by the remaining NYSERDA milestones 9. Single Pass Beam Energy Scan June 2019 10. Single Pass Beam with Energy Recovery October 2019 11. Four Pass Beam with Energy Recovery December 2019 To complete this milestone, we need to: • Thread the beam back through the MLC, decelerate, steer through dump • Adjust splitter bellows for correct timing • Find MLC cavity settings that have per-cavity energy balance • (Needed?) Adjust injector longitudinal phase space for best recovery • (optional) Slowly increase the current. Shoot for KPP current now? • Find sources of beam loss (bad orbit clipping, final energy spread, etc) and fix Main point: This is new territory for us and challenging. But each new task can be handled individually, using well-understood diagnostics.

  8. Milestone Our big picture plan is driven by the remaining NYSERDA milestones 9. Single Pass Beam Energy Scan June 2019 10. Single Pass Beam with Energy Recovery October 2019 11. Four Pass Beam with Energy Recovery December 2019 To complete this milestone, we need to: • Accelerate up to 150 MeV, decelerate back to dump • Much tighter tolerance on beam energy, cavity phases. • (Two new types of) BPMs are untested in this mode • Dramatically larger scale for errors in the lattice to accumulate • 3 complete deceleration turns without independent optics control • Unlikely to attempt high current Main point: This is new territory, extremely challenging, relies on new diagnostics. How are we going to get here in December?

  9. Timeline of Timelines We have had many different versions of timelines, but all of them have been driven by the single goal of achieving 4-pass energy recovery in December. Original 1-pass to 4-pass timeline from early 2018: • We are within days of the expected FFA arc threading goal, still on track. Optimistic 1-pass to 2-pass timeline from early 2019: • We had hoped to complete 1-pass energy recovery by May, and switch to 2-pass by June. • This turned out to be unrealistic Current Timeline (April 25th): • We complete 1-pass ER by the July 15th shutdown, and have all potential configurations ready for installation. • Plan for a switch to 4-pass, but have a potential change date on July 8th • Second opportunity for a potential change date in early October

  10. Plan Amendments On April 25th, the following changes were discussed and approved by the senior management and other major stakeholders.

  11. Milestone Timeline

  12. Weekly Planning How do we go from this big picture plan to day-to-day operation? • We have a weekly meeting on Friday afternoon to set the shift schedule and weekly/daily objectives for the next week. • We also have an informal daily shift planning meeting, typically in the morning, though we will transition this to a “shift change” meeting when we begin full-day operation. • The weekly meeting is run by the Run Coordinator, the schedule organized by the Commissioning L2, the scientific plan is organized by the Scientific Coordinator, and the shifts are divided among the Lead Operators. Lots of roles! How does all of this work?

  13. From Timeline to Reality • Let me introduce each of these roles to explain it… Senior Management (Georg,Dejan, Steve, Rob, …) Scientific Coordinator (Scott) Commissioning L2 (Adam) Lead Operators (Adam, Colwyn, Kirsten)

  14. From Timeline to Reality • Senior Management (SM): • The SM is expected to give the operations team a very high level set of goals and expectations, and to keep track of progress. Senior Management (Georg,Dejan, Steve, Rob, …) Scientific Coordinator (Scott) Commissioning L2 (Adam) Lead Operators Example: “We need 1-pass energy recovery by July.” (Adam, Colwyn, Kirsten)

  15. From Timeline to Reality • Scientific Coordinator (SC) : • The Scientific Coordinator turns high level goals into detailed daily physics measurements. This is a huge responsibility! They must keep track of the big picture and set goals accordingly, while also keeping track of installation progress and the implied limits. The SC is encouraged to be more optimistic than realistic. Senior Management (Georg,Dejan, Steve, Rob, …) Scientific Coordinator (Scott) Commissioning L2 (Adam) Lead Operators Example: “Energy recovery requires accurate calibration and phasing of cavities, which requires accurate timing data from BPMs. To get that required accuracy, we need to make these BPM test measurements today.” (Adam, Colwyn, Kirsten)

  16. From Timeline to Reality • Commissioning L2 (L2) : • The L2 gets the final say in what the daily plan is, and what measurements take priority. He must narrow down the plan from the SC to goals that he believes are possible, and then organize the details of how the measurements are performed. He is encouraged to be more realistic than optimistic. Senior Management (Georg,Dejan, Steve, Rob, …) Scientific Coordinator (Scott) Commissioning L2 (Adam) Lead Operators Example: “Fine, we can take some BPM measurements, but we have to keep it under an hour, or there won’t be time for the rest. Kirsten, I need you to write a new script to take this data.” (Adam, Colwyn, Kirsten)

  17. From Timeline to Reality • Lead Operators (LO) : • One lead operator is required to be in the room for all operation. They are the ones “pushing the buttons” and are in charge of maintaining equipment and personnel protection. Senior Management (Georg,Dejan, Steve, Rob, …) Scientific Coordinator (Scott) Commissioning L2 (Adam) Lead Operators Example: “Sure, I can write that script, but someone else is going to need to set up the injector.” (Adam, Colwyn, Kirsten)

  18. From Timeline to Reality • Run Coordinator (RC) : • The run coordinator is the glue that keeps everything together, and the oil that greases the gears. He has to keep track of everything. Senior Management (Georg,Dejan, Steve, Rob, …) Run Coordinator (Karl) Scientific Coordinator (Scott) Commissioning L2 (Adam) Lead Operators Example: “We can get two power supplies ready for the run tonight, but not more. And we can’t lock up until 4:00, in order to let the vacuum work finish.” (Adam, Colwyn, Kirsten)

  19. Who’s in Charge? • The most common question/complaint that I hear is: “who’s in charge?” • This underlies a problem with this setup. What happens when the SC disagrees with the L2? If it involves daily measurements, then the L2 has the final word, but if it involves interactions with other L2s, technical staff, or long-term planning, then it isn’t clear. • Some of the problem is due to a culture shock. In the past at Cornell, most of those roles were compressed into a single person, and he was the single point of contact for the final word. Back then, there was an answer to the question: “who’s in charge?” Now, the answer is not so simple. • In order for this to work better, we have to improve our communication, and the roles of each person need to be better fleshed out.

  20. Who’s on Shift? • The other most common question/complaint I get is, “why aren’t we running this weekend/night?” • We have a very limited operation staff • 3 LOs,working 50-80 hours/week. • 1 SC, working 80 hours/week, at CU (!) • 2 RF experts, working 80 hours/week This is not sustainable! • We need more operators, or reduced shifts • (But!) operators need ~1 month of full time involvement before they become useful • CU grad students have shown interest, but cannot devote 100% of their time • BNL may have possible people, but they need to be prepared for a huge level of involvement here. Scott Berg exemplifies the needed level of commitment. • We need to shift operations earlier in the day (9:00-8:00, instead of 2:00-12:00)

  21. But it’s working! We have a truly excellent group of scientists, engineers, and technicians working on this project. But especially, I want to thank the operations staff for being supportive, laid-back under pressure, and flexible enough to change plans on a daily basis!