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RAFT PowerPoint Presentation

RAFT

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RAFT

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  1. RAFT Doug Buehl cited in: Teaching Reading in the Content Areas: If Not Me Then Who BillMeyer & Martin, 1998 Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  2. RAFTAssignments • What is it? Role Audience Format Topic • How might I use it? • Examples . . . Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  3. A RAFT is… • … an engaging, high level strategy that encourages writing across the curriculum • … a way to encourage students to… • …assume a role • …consider their audience, while • …examine a topic from their chosen perspective, and • …writing in a particular format • All of the above can serve as motivators by giving students choice, appealing to their interests and learning profiles, and adapting to student readiness levels. Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  4. RAFTs can… • Be differentiated in a variety of ways: readiness level, learning profile, and/or student interest • Be created by the students or Incorporate a blank row for that option • Be used as introductory “hooks” into a unit of study • Keep one column consistent while varying the other columns in the RAFT grid Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  5. Sample RAFT Strips Language Arts Science History Math Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas Format based on the work of Doug Buehl cited in Teaching Reading in the Content Areas: If Not Me Then Who?, Billmeyer and Martin, 1998

  6. Sample RAFT Strips Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  7. RAFT Strips, cont’d Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  8. Analyzing a RAFT lesson • What are the learning goals for this lesson? Are they built into every choice? • How is this RAFT being differentiated? • Is there a wide range of format choices in order to appeal to LEARNING STYLES? • Is there a range of difficulty in the roles? or a range of difficulty in the formats? or a range of difficulty in the topic responses? READINESS • Are the roles, or formats, or topics meant to appeal to a variety of INTERESTS? Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  9. Possible Formats to use in RAFTs to Differentiate by Lrng Modality Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  10. How you might assign RAFTs • Cut the “strips” apart and hand out to students; or • Give only two choices per student, and make both choices have formats fit with that student’s learning modality • Give only two choices per student, and make both choices fit skill/knowledge level of the student’s readiness; or • Allow students to choose from a menu of possible roles, or possible formats Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  11. RAFT Activities Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  12. 5th Grade Math RAFT Assignment: Parts of a Whole Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  13. READINESS DIFFERENTIATION: WRITING RAFT The teacher will assign sets of choices to students based on pre-assessed skill levels in sequencing and writing: Grade level or Advanced level. Within a skill level, students will still have some learning style or interest-based choices through the format options. Levels would NOT be seen by the students. Know: sequence; pace Understand: Seeing events in a logical order helps us better understand them. Do: Place items in order of occurrence; write with accuracy & completeness Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  14. Tom Sawyer’s R.A.F.T. (Page 1) • This RAFT is designed for use by students when they have finished reading the novel, Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain. The RAFT synthesizes the unit’s exploration of characterization and allows students to “step into the skin” of one of the supporting characters to get a look at the protagonist from his/her perspective. A final jigsaw activity allows students to view Tom form multiple perspectives in order to reinforce the unit’s essential understandings (students share their RAFTs in mixed groups and complete a synthesis writing piece in which they draw conclusions about Tom based on all perspectives aired in the group). • Raft Learning Goals • Students should KNOW… • The definition of characterization • The six supporting characters’ relationships with Tom Sawyer • Students should UNDERSTAND that… • Individuals have their own unique perspectives determined by their experiences and relationships. • In order to gain a true understanding of a person or event, multiple perspectives must be considered. • Students should BE ABLE TO… • Assume the voice of a supporting character • Characterize Tom Sawyer using the methods discussed in class • Draw conclusions synthesizing multiple and varied perspectives Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  15. Tom Sawyer’s R.A.F.T.(Page 2) • Differentiation: This RAFT is differentiated according to readiness and interest. • Interests: Each student has three options from which to choose, so he/she can select a “strip” that appeals to them in some way (affinity with a character, interest/talent in the format’s expression, interest in the topic, etc.) • Readiness: • The first three strips should be given to more advanced students, as these three options are more conceptual. • The roles and topics represent less accessible points of view and are designed for student who are ready to tackle the novel at a more abstract level and/or • The formats are designed for students who are reading and writing on or above grade level (and are thus able to handle more complex modes of expression). • The second three “strips” offer options that are simpler and more straightforward. • The roles and topics represent more accessible views and are designed for students who understand the novel at a more basic level, and/or • The formats are accessible for students who are struggling readers/writers. Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  16. Tom Sawyer’s R.A.F.T. p. 3 • Select one of the following prompts. The “Role” refers to the character’s perspective that you will assume. The “Audience” refers to whom that character will be addressing his/her opinion; The “Format” refers to the form in which the opinion will be expressed; The “Topic” is just that - your topic! • Circle the ROLE that you plan to pursue, and clear it with your teacher before you begin working. Use your text to help you. Authors: Kristina Doubet, Marla Capper, and Christie Reed - 2003 Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  17. Ways to differentiate a RAFT by Readiness:(teacher will assign a RAFT or choices of RAFTs based on students’ writing, reading, or performance levels) • Roles/Audience – • Well-known people or characters to lesser-known • Basic essential items (vocabulary, inventions, elements, etc.) to more esoteric items • Easier to understand point-of-view to more intangible perspective • Formats – (while offering choices to students) • Shorter to longer (in prep, in process, or in presentation) • More familiar to more unfamiliar formats • Single step to multiple steps • Topics – • Easier to interpret to more sophisticated • Concrete & literal response to more abstract response • More structured to more open-ended • Small leap in insight & application to larger leap Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  18. RAFT AssignmentsGrade 10 English • Know: Voice, Tone, Style • Understand: • Every writer has a voice • Voice is shaped by life experiences and reflects the writer • Voice shapes expression • Voice affects communication • Voice and style are related • Be Able to Do: • Describe a writers voice and style • Mimic a writer’s voice and style • Create a piece of writing that reflects a writer’s voice and style Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas

  19. RAFT Assignment Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas Candy Krueger Timberline High School Boise, ID

  20. RAFT Planning Sheet Know Understand Do How to Differentiate: • Tiered? (See Equalizer) • Profile? (Differentiate Format) • Interest? (Keep options equivalent in learning) • Other? Marcia Imbeau, Assoc. Professor, University of Arkansas