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Teaching English Reading in a Bilingual Classroom
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Teaching English Reading in a Bilingual Classroom

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  1. Teaching English Reading in a Bilingual Classroom

  2. ESL/Bilingual Learners • “Children do not become readers unless they have time, materials, models, and motivation.” • (Cunningham & Allington, 1999)

  3. Overview • What is effective reading instruction? • Explain and demonstrate the five components of reading instruction. • Additional instruction that fosters a successful reading experience

  4. Characteristics of Effective Instruction • Provide time • Provide teacher modeling • Read to children • Read with children • Provide a print rich environment • Provide a variety of strategies

  5. Time • For talk • For reading • For writing

  6. Teacher Modeling • Provides an insight to “thinking about thinking” • Allows opportunity to visually see what is expected of them • Encourages participation • Interactive through shared reading and shared writing

  7. Reading To • Models what good reading sounds like • Exposes students to vocabulary • Implicit teaching points can be made

  8. Reading With • Provides support to reader • It is non-threatening • Allows for one-on-one interaction

  9. Provide a Print Rich Environment • That includes student work • Shows students that print bears meaning • Includes an array of books that children can relate to

  10. Provide a Variety of Strategies • To accommodate learning styles • Different types of text calls for a variety of graphic organizers

  11. Introduction to the Five Components

  12. Phonemic Awareness Comprehension Phonics Reading Components Fluency Vocabulary

  13. PHONEMIC AWARENESS

  14. Phonemic Awareness (PA) • What is Phonemic Awareness?

  15. The ability to hear and manipulate sounds. It deals with students being able to hear and differentiate sounds through oral language activities.

  16. Phonemic Awareness (cont’d) • Why is it important?

  17. It prepares readers for phonics, sounding out words. • It establishes a foundation for later reading skills.

  18. Activities to Develop Phonemic Awareness in the Classroom

  19. Rhyming Word Activity • 1. Use word families. • 2. Hands on games. • 3. Using words in context. • 4. Write words with a rhyming pattern.

  20. Phonemic Activity • Sound blending • Sound count • Sound match • Sound switching • Syllable count

  21. PHONICS

  22. How do I teach phonics effectively?

  23. In addition to set phonics instruction • Giving students ample opportunities to work with words and make the connection to reading and writing, • Incorporating rhyming poems for read alouds, for shared reading, and shared writing

  24. Activities for Teaching Phonics

  25. Sight Word Activity • Use manipulatives • Incorporate writing • Use words in sentences

  26. Big Books • Select books with patterns • Exposes to basic sight words

  27. Making Words • Beginning sounds • Ending sounds • Medial vowel sounds • Beginning blends • Vowel diagraphs ex: toad, fleet

  28. FLUENCY

  29. Components of Fluency • Speed • Accuracy • Prosody

  30. Why is fluency important?

  31. After primary grades students are expected to read independently. • Non-fluent readers likely to avoid reading. • Students who avoid reading are less likely to be exposed to ideas and vocabulary and may loose intellectual, as well as academic ground.

  32. Creating Fluent Readers • Includes: • Modeling fluent reading • Providing many opportunities to read the same text orally several times • Select text at an easy level • Incorporating a variety of techniques such as audiotapes, buddy reading, choral reading, and reader’s theatre

  33. Activities for Creating Fluent Readers

  34. Paired Reading • Two read together from the text. • Students monitor reading

  35. Poems • Repeated readings. • Repetition of spelling word patterns. • Time for independent practice.

  36. Poems and Songs • Choose songs and rhymes that are enjoyed by your students or connect to a science or social studies concept. Print the words on chart paper. Engage the students in repeated reading or singings.

  37. Reader’s Theater • Select a script or create one • Assign parts of the texts to each group. • Highlight the part of each student • Provide lots of practice time for groups • Encourage students to read fluently and expressively with good phrasing. • Help students define and pronounce any words. • Perform

  38. VOCABULARY

  39. Vocabulary • Two Kinds • 1. Written Vocabulary- • reading and writing • 2. Oral Vocabulary- • listening and speaking

  40. Vocabulary • Is crucial for comprehension • Can be taught indirectly • Takes place when students are active in figuring out how words relate to experiences • Takes place when students personalize words

  41. Vocabulary (cont’d) • Students need to be immersed into words through: • Read alouds • Dialog between student to student, student to teacher, and student to adult

  42. Activities for Vocabulary

  43. Vocabulary Cluster • Use science and social studies • Students gather context clues from reading • Students make predictions

  44. Word Wall • Opportunities to use in writing • Chants for interactive learning • Instant recognition in context

  45. Vocabulary Context Clues • 1.Think about the story. • 2. Check the picture. • 3. Go back and get your mouth ready. • 4. Look for chunks. • 5. Does the word look like another word you know?

  46. Shared Reading Experiences • Choral reading • Shared reading • Vocabulary knowledge is introduced through discussion and oral language

  47. Read Aloud • Select a fiction or nonfiction text that relates to a science or social studies concept. • Through read-alouds students will learn vocabulary ten times faster than those receiving intensive word-list instruction.

  48. Comprehension

  49. Why is comprehension important?

  50. It is the most important thing about reading! And • It allows students to make meaning beyond literal recall.