Download
history of digital computers n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
History of digital computers PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
History of digital computers

History of digital computers

514 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

History of digital computers

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. History of digital computers

  2. HISTORY of DIGITAL COMPUTERS • Before Digital Computers • Early Systems • Contemporary systems

  3. Before Digital Computers • The Abacus • Napier’s Bones • Pascal’s Arithmetic Machine • Leibniz and the Stepped Reckoner • Jaquard’s Loom • Babbage’s Analytical Engine • Lady Lovelance • Boolean Logic • Hollerith’s Punched-Card Tabulating Machine • Powers and the Simultaneous Punching Machine

  4. Bead at center counts 5 counts 1 0 0 7 2 3 0 1 8 9 The Abacus • 3000 B.C. until now used by the Chinese

  5. Napier’s Bones • 1615 Scottish John Napier invented a computing device that facilitated multiplications and divisions • 1620 the principle was used to invent the first slide rule • The slide rule disappeared in the 1970’s by introducing the electronic calculator

  6. Pascal’s Arithmetic Machine • 1642 Blaise Pascal (19 years old) designed the Pascal’s arithmetic machine. • Via wheels and gears calculations were possible. • Principle nowadays still used in automobile odometers to record mileage. • The machine revealed to the public in 1645 was not a success because it required considerable skill to operate. • The machine performed +, -, *, /

  7. Pascal’s arithmetic machine

  8. Leibniz and the Stepped Reckoner • 1673 Gottfried Leibniz modified Pascal’s machine to perform * and / more directly. • Multiplication was implemented automatically via a number of additions. Divisions via a number of subtractions. • The machine turned complex arithmetic into a series of steps involving simpler operations.

  9. Stepped Reckoner

  10. Jaquard’s Loom • Major contribution to computer methods came from the weaving industry. • 1801 Joseph Marie Jacquard developed an attachment for weaving looms that used punched cards to “program” a loom to a specific pattern.

  11. Babbage’s Analytical Engine • 1830 Babbage worked on the Difference Machine which was abandoned in 1834 for the Analytical Engine. • The Analytical Engine was designed to have • a store to hold data and results of calculations • a mill was to be a central mechanism for performing mathematical operations • a systems of gears and levers was to transfer data back and forth between the store and the mill • the input/output unit was to read data from outside the machine into its store and display the results of the calculations • Effort stopped in 1842.

  12. Babbage

  13. Remake of Diff. Machine

  14. Lady Lovelance • 1842 Augusta Ada Byron, Countess of Lovelance, daughter of the poet Lord Byron, translated a paper on Babbage’s Analytical engine from French to English. • She made so much notes and examples which were later considered as the first computer programs. • The ADA programming language is named after her.

  15. Boolean Logic • The application of the binary system to computers was facilitated by work performed in the mid 1800s by George Boole. • 1854 publishing of the Principles of Boolean logic

  16. Hollerith’s Punched-Card Tabulating Machine (1) • US census every 10 years. Manual treatment took 7 years if only heads were counted. • tabulation of social, ethnic and economic data would take 12 years to treat manually. • John Billing suggested the used of punched cards for recording the facts and a machine to treat them. • Herman Hollerith (Billings’s associate) made the design which was patented on March 31, 1884.

  17. Hollerith’s Punched-Card Tabulating Machine (2) • The census of 1890 used the machine and took only 2,5 years to complete. • Hollerith started the Tabulating Machine Company in 1896 which became the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company after a series of mergers. • In 1924, under the leading of J. Watson, Sr. the company was renamed International Business Machines (IBM) which is now the largest computer company.

  18. EARLY SYSTEMS • Aiken and the Harvard Mark I • Atanasoff and the ABC • Mauchly, Eckert and the ENIAC • Von Neuman and the Stored Program Concept • Wilkes and the EDSAC • UNIVAC: the first commercial computer • IBM: the Giant Awakens

  19. Aiken and the Harvard Mark I • If Babbage had lived 75 years later, I would have been out of job. Howard Aiken • 1939 H. Aiken of Harvard University began working on a machine to perform scientific calculations faster. • IBM sponsored Aiken and the MARK I was completed in 1944 (IBM ASCC) • The first real computer was born. • the first general purpose digital electro-mechanical computer • The MARK I performed faithfully for 10 years.

  20. Mark I • 51 feet long, 8 feet high, 3 feet deep • weight: many tons • 3000 mechanical switches • 750.000 electronic components • 500 miles of wiring • Controlled by punched paper tape • Stored its numbers in mechanical switches • Used decimal numbers • Accuracy: 23 digits • 3 +/s, 1 * in 6 s, 1 / in 12 s

  21. Mark I

  22. Atanasoff and the ABC • 1942 John Vincent Atanasoff of Iowa State College and Clifford Berry (his graduate student) completed work on an electronic vacuum tube computer. • The Antony, Berry Computer (ABC) is the first electronic digital computer • Used the binary system • Designed for solving simultaneous equations

  23. Antanasof

  24. ABC

  25. Mauchly, Eckert and the ENIAC • John W. Mauchly of the University of Pennsylvania together with J. Presper Eckert, Jr. a graduate student, built the first electronic general purpose computer. • The Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer (ENIAC) was funded by the U.S. Army as the need for computing accurate ballistic tables in WW II. • Completed in 1945.

  26. Eckert & Mauchly

  27. ENIAC • 1500 square feet of floor - 30 tons • 19.000 vacuum tubes • 500.000 soldered joints and no moving parts • Decimal arithmetic • in 1 sec: 5000 + or 300 * of 10 digit numbers • Needed a lot of power • Big problem to keep the machine working (vacuum tubes were relatively short-lived)

  28. ENIAC 150MHz Pentium Speed 5,000 additions / second 300,000,000 Memory 200 digits 16,000,000 Elements 18,000 vacuum tubes 6,000 switches 10,000 capcitors 70,000 resistors 1,500 relays 4,000,000 transistors (CPU) Size 10 feet tall x 1,800 square feet 9" x 12" x 3" Weight 30 tons 6 pounds

  29. Bug

  30. Von Neuman and the Stored Program Concept • 1946: John von Neumann joined Mauchly & Eckert and began working on an improved version of the ENIAC called EDVAC (Electronic Discrete Variable Automatic Computer). • von Neumann proposed that the program as well as the data it operated should be stored in the computer’s memory • perform a program from memory is much faster than performing it from punched cards. • This is one of the most important developments in the computer field in the 1900s

  31. Edvac

  32. Von Neuman

  33. Wilkes and the EDSAC • 1949 (before EDVAC) the first stored program computer was developed by Maurice Wilkes at the University of Cambridge in England: EDSAC (Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator) • As soon as we started programming, we found to our surprise that is wasn’t as easy to get programs right as we had thought. Debugging had to be discovered. I can remember the exact instance when i realized that a large part of my life from then on was going to be spent in finding mistakes in my own program. • M. Wilkes at the opening of the Digital Computer Museum in Marlboro, Massachusetts (now in Boston) in 1979.

  34. Wilkes

  35. UNIVAC: the first commercial computer • 1946: Echert and Mauchly left the University of Pennsylvania to form Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation which was acquired by Remington Rand three years later. • Remington Rand intended for commercial data processing systems. • They delivered a computer called UNIVAC I in 1951 at the Bureau of Census in the US. • The computer was used reliably until 1963. • The UNIVAC I computer was used in 1952 to predict the election of Eisenhower with only 3 percent of the popular vote counted.

  36. Univac